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Faust

Sorry I Got Another Question

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How is air supplied in a pond? I want to set up a small one, like maybe 250gal-500gal, although I am not sure the best way to go about it all. What a good filter to use is, how is air supplied, things of that nature.

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Would love to help you out, but I know nothing about ponds! :(

I am sure someone will come along soon with an answer!! :)

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You should root around in the pond section. There is lots of info there. :)

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/...hp?showforum=63

Edited by ryukin girl

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I think a lot of ponds have small fountains that would do the job, but I'm no expert.

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I have a large pond but it's so big that it doesn't need a filter. So I never looked into pond filters. Try googling pond filters I'm sure you'll be able to find a lot of information.

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I also recommend looking around in the 'ponds' department for info/advice/help, but I have some basic knowledge.

Often a pond will have much more surface area per fish than a tank (and more gallons/fish), so aeration isn't such a problem (but if you have green water, you need to be aware that at night it uses O2 and produces CO2). Fountains and waterfalls are popular water return/aeration devices.

There are filters specifically designed for ponds; pond filters are large, rugged, designed for use outdoors, and usually don't include the pump or hoses (there's a little more DIY and customization in pond setups).

Are you planning on moving your goldies outside for the summer? It will be good for them :)

Edited by A Penguin

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I have a large pond but it's so big that it doesn't need a filter. So I never looked into pond filters. Try googling pond filters I'm sure you'll be able to find a lot of information.

How large is your pond? And at what point is that large area big enough to get away with it? OH! I have another question too. If Goldfish fry need the water lowered to 5 or 6" because of fear of collapsing under aquarium pressure, then how do they mate and have fry naturally in the wild? I couldn't imagine goldfish surviving in ponds with no less than 2 to 3ft of water (in height) in a natural area.

and thanks everyone for your help, comments, and input.

Edited by Faust

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Freshwater fish tend to lay eggs in shallow areas. You have to remember that depths vary in bodies of water and most ponds will have shallow areas as well.

Are you going to use a pre-formed pond?

Edited by RickLaJambe

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How large is your pond? And at what point is that large area big enough to get away with it?

My pond has a surface area of around 43,000 sq feet and is around 25 feet deep. I don't know how many gallons it is.

I have a friend who also has a pond. Their pond is smaller than mine and they don't have a filter either. I would guess that the surface area of their pond is 5,000 to 8,000 sq feet and it's around 10 feet deep. I'm not sure how big is big enough to get away with going without a filter but it would have to be big. Tens of thousands of gallons.

I've had goldfish fry in a full 29 gallon aquarium and they were fine.

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Yes, well, with a pond that size, it's definitely beyond the need of a filter. That's a small lake! lol! But, most people aren't nearly so lucky to have a backyard pond that large. Man! My mouth is drooling at what I could keep in a pond like that!

I had a 200 gallon pond, so I have an idea of the size you're talking about. That's small as far as ponds go, so you definitely need aeration. Building a waterfall is a beautiful way to create aeration. When I choose a pond filter, I first look at how many gallons my pond is. Let's say 200 gallons. Then choose at least the next pump size up after that, but I prefer to go two sizes up; say for a 400-500 gallon pond. The reason? If you have a waterfall, you need to have additional pump power to push that water upwards to the top of the waterfall. And if you want to have a nice, strong flow, you need a lot more power than you think. There are books, like Sunset's How to Build a Backyard Pond, that give you very specific calculations for filter selection. Go find one of these books at Home Depot. They're a wealth of information on how to build a pond from start to finish. They're great!

Bottom line, Faust, is the water just needs to have movement. The surface of the water should be broken as much as possible. The more movement the water has, the more oxygen is being turned over into the water. Fountains, waterfalls, streams. Anything that causes the water to circulate. Water that doesn't move is called stagnant. Stagnant water gets no or very little oxygen. Once that occurs, you get anaerobic bacterias start to grow and that causes a depletion of oxygen and an increase in potential illnesses.

Most ponds have a "shelf" or shallow area where you can grow bog plants and would also serve as a safe area for fish to lay eggs and for fry to live. Having a lot of bog plants in this area increases the safety of the fry there. If you want to try to have fry in the pond, make sure you build a pond that has such a shallow area.

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Yes, well, with a pond that size, it's definitely beyond the need of a filter. That's a small lake! lol! But, most people aren't nearly so lucky to have a backyard pond that large. Man! My mouth is drooling at what I could keep in a pond like that!

I had a 200 gallon pond, so I have an idea of the size you're talking about. That's small as far as ponds go, so you definitely need aeration. Building a waterfall is a beautiful way to create aeration. When I choose a pond filter, I first look at how many gallons my pond is. Let's say 200 gallons. Then choose at least the next pump size up after that, but I prefer to go two sizes up; say for a 400-500 gallon pond. The reason? If you have a waterfall, you need to have additional pump power to push that water upwards to the top of the waterfall. And if you want to have a nice, strong flow, you need a lot more power than you think. There are books, like Sunset's How to Build a Backyard Pond, that give you very specific calculations for filter selection. Go find one of these books at Home Depot. They're a wealth of information on how to build a pond from start to finish. They're great!

Bottom line, Faust, is the water just needs to have movement. The surface of the water should be broken as much as possible. The more movement the water has, the more oxygen is being turned over into the water. Fountains, waterfalls, streams. Anything that causes the water to circulate. Water that doesn't move is called stagnant. Stagnant water gets no or very little oxygen. Once that occurs, you get anaerobic bacterias start to grow and that causes a depletion of oxygen and an increase in potential illnesses.

Most ponds have a "shelf" or shallow area where you can grow bog plants and would also serve as a safe area for fish to lay eggs and for fry to live. Having a lot of bog plants in this area increases the safety of the fry there. If you want to try to have fry in the pond, make sure you build a pond that has such a shallow area.

Very nice! Thanks for the information. I will be looking into doing this very soon. I guess I can take up the whole backyard if I wanted to, but I want to plan this out right. Since I have went crazy on aeration in the tank, I like how much happier the fish have been. I guess they required more since they gotten bigger, bubbles literally cover the top of the tank now. I am sure I can figure it out, but I want to make it easy for them to use to breed in it as well, and would like to have a fairly decent size pond for all year around. We only get extreme heat, so I have to shield them from the sun until about 2pm and on, because our summers are killer. Our winters? Nothing freezes over, so I am sure we will be real good.

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We only get extreme heat, so I have to shield them from the sun until about 2pm and on, because our summers are killer. Our winters? Nothing freezes over, so I am sure we will be real good.

I think that is why it's called Bakersfield. :rofl

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We only get extreme heat, so I have to shield them from the sun until about 2pm and on, because our summers are killer. Our winters? Nothing freezes over, so I am sure we will be real good.

I think that is why it's called Bakersfield. :rofl

LOL Yeah good one! I never thought about that.

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