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Chrissy_Bee

A Few Basic Questions

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One thing I know very little about is goldfish breeding. I had a fish lay eggs a few years ago, but beyond that I have no experience. My deme George has had breeding stars for a few months now, he pretty much got them as soon as I put my new pearlscale (Frederick) in with him. My questions are...

Is it a sure thing that "Fred" is a female, and if so, that she will lay eggs? I know she may already have done so and I just didn't see them before they were eaten (espeically since Fred is an insane eater).

Also, I'm assuming there's external fertilization? How long does it take the male to deposit the sperm?

Thanks to anyone who can help :D

I'd like to save an egg or two...if they ever come...and try to raise some babies. (That would give me a great excuse to buy another tank!!)

Edited by Chrissy_Bee

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I asked a question a few days back if females always drop eggs? I hope someone can help you better!!!

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Females do not ALWAYS drop eggs. Females (and males to a slightly lesser degree) do better at breeding if properly "prepped". In nature, the goldfish will feed heavily on greens and plants in the pond during the summer. But in the fall, the greens die back as the cold weather comes in. Dead and dying insects fall on the surface of the pond and the fish glut themselves on protien.

After this feeding, the temps drop and the fish go into dormancy. Some are colder than others - but a degree of cold semi-dormancy is generally needed for the best breeding reactions. When the temps start warming up, the days start lengthening and the air pressure drops more often during spring storms, the fish will drop their eggs. Females may drop a season's worth of eggs within a few days - or may have 2 -3 rounds of spawning. Having an interested male in the tank to pursue her can help convince her to drop eggs.

Not all females, even if properly prepped will spawn every year. Some wait many years before finally producing. Others spawn multiple times a year. I have a friend whose champion Bristol took 7 years before she dropped. But she produced winners, so it was worth it.

If a female fish is prepped and full of eggs, yet FAILS to drop the eggs, they can rot and ferment inside of her. This can cause what is called "egg impaction". The fermenting process can introduce bad bacterial infections into the fish - often resulting in death.

Male fish, during a period of dormancy will have their breeding stars reduce in size. On some fish it is much more difficult to see them. When a male comes into breeding season, though, his breeding stars will become very distinctive. A male fish cannot suffer from "milt impaction" though.

Whena femal lays eggs, she will spray them all over the tank. The male chasing her will release milt into the water as he goes - and the eggs become fertilized. It has to happen within moments of the eggs leaving the female or the eggs will not become fertile. Fertile goldfish eggs have a sticky outer coating - they stick to everything - plants, tank sides, etc. If youplace what is called a "breeding mop" into the tank, the eggs will stick on it. I place mats of low, soft plastic plants on the bottom of my spawning tanks. The eggs stick in these - and the adult fish cannot get to them to eat them. When they are done spawning, I remove the mats, rinse them gently and place them in a hatching tank. Keep the water at 70 F. I have found that the breeds with longer double tails do a bit better at 71F and the single tailed breeds do a bit better at 69F. Temp is essential. Too cold and the eggs will not hatch soon enough. Too warm and they will hatch before the embreyo is fully mature. The fry will then attach themselves to every surface in the hatching tank - hanging off the plants and glass. They will hang for about 1.5 days - some a bit longer - others less. At that time they will make a dash to the surface and gulp a very important gulp of air to fill their swim bladders. Then they are free swimming and ready to feed.

To help the fry get that first gulp of air, it is important that your hatching tank is no deeper than 6-8 inches. I run at about 6.

Feeding.... that is another whole matter. You need to keep the tank warme (70ish) and pristine. (sponge filters). FEeding should occur every 4 hours or so.

You can hatch out 1000s of fry with each spawning. Expect to get about 100 viable fry from 1000 hatched - and maybe 10 that are good examples of breed.

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Thanks! I guess I'll just have to keep watching. I have a lot of plants in there now, so I've just been looking at them everyday to see if I notice eggs. Years ago when I had a fish lay them they were all over the tank, like you said, but most noticable on the silk plant I had.

I don't think I'm going to try and make anything happen, but I want to be prepared if it does :D

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Thanks, Daryl! So I guess what you are saying is that it is possible to have a female and male in the same tank and the female never dro any eggs? Also, does age have anything to do with when they CAN drop eggs?

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My young fish starts to spawn before they are a year old, I don't know if that is very early.

Belly and Brownie had healthy babies last year, they were one year old then!

My females (and males) have always spawned several times every year...

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My young fish starts to spawn before they are a year old, I don't know if that is very early

My deme is less than a year old for sure, he was *tiny* when I got him in the summer. The pearlie I'm not sure about, but I don't think he/she is too old either.

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My "fry" from last year just spawned. They are 11 months old - 3 inches in body.

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Daryl, When you breed your champion show fantails (I think you mentioned having Rykin, Ranchu, lionhead, and others.) what percentage of babies would you guess are single tailed and do the champion show fantails produce fewer single tailed babies than the lower quality fantail types found in the pet stores.

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I have bred Ryukin, Broadtail Ryukin, RAnchu, Lionhead, and Phoenix. I have never had a single tailed baby in the lot of them. I have had well over 4000 babies.

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I have had well over 4000 babies.
WOAH mama! hahaha, that's awesome :)

I hope my guys do produce some fry, I think it'd be a great experience :heart

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I have bred Ryukin, Broadtail Ryukin, RAnchu, Lionhead, and Phoenix. I have never had a single tailed baby in the lot of them. I have had well over 4000 babies.

Not one in over 4000 babies. Wow. Your fish must be from some really stable lines.

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Stable in that respect. I still get curled gills, single anals, lack of humps on Ryukins, substantial soft-gills, unmatched fins, etc. I am still waiting to see if my Lionheads develop any respectable wens. So far they are quite rudimentary.

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Today George's breeding stars are even more pronounced, a couple of spots are pure white (almost like ich) AND one of his scales is gone! I'm thinking he got a little too wild chasing his girlfriend today. I wonder if I'll be seeing eggs?? This is kind of exciting :D

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