Jump to content
Kokos Goldfish Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Carli

Ph Crashes And Buffering

Recommended Posts

I guess I don't have a handle on the whole ph crash issue yet. Our tap water is fluctuating so much I'm not sure what the city is doing to it. I have never buffered my water since my Ph is usually 8.4, Kh 180. Our water comes from a deep aquifer and it's treated by the city. The readings have been all over the place from the tap. Yesterday I had 2ppm Ammonia straight from the tap. How am I supposed to keep fish alive when things fluctuate so drastically. Today the tap water is Ph 7.2, Kh 180,

Gh 100, 0 Ammonia (find that difficult to believe, it's usually .25-2.0), 0 Nitrites, 0 Nitrates.

I got up at 4am this morning to a PH crash in my Q tank. One small ranchu, 29 gallons, cycled Eheim 2222 and Penquin HOB. Fish seriously distressed, gasping, floating, serious slime coat. Ph 6.0 or lower. I was in a hurry to save the fish so forgot to test strip for Kh, Gh..I treated some water with Chloram x, adjusted the Ph slowly with baking soda to 7.2 (dip strip) 7.6 (test kit). The tank is now Ph 7.4, Kh 180, GH 100. When the water parameters and temps between the two bodies of water were the same I moved the ranchu back to the tank and she seems better at the moment.

I don't know what happened. 50% water change day before, chloram x for the chloramines. This tank has been salted lightly 0.1, no plants, well oxygenated.

Now,

Tap 7.2, 180, 100

Tank 7.4,180, 100

IF my tap water readings are correct then why the PH crash during the night?

I am going to replace my dip strips and test kits today. Should I try to find some crushed coral? (how does this work on the Kh or does it just work on the Gh?) How long does it take for the baking soda to fully bring the Ph up? Successive amounts of baking soda won't hurt will it? I know the Ph is at a good level but it's low compared to what it usually is. Will this hurt anything? Should I leave it as it is?

What's happening here? I am limiting feeding until I'm sure things are stable again. I'm afraid to go to work tonight for fear this time I won't be home to intervene.

Carli

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just curious, what did you find out? I've struggled with this in the past and have resorted to adding a kH buffer to my water.

Chrissy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello.

Crushed coral is a good buffer as it gradually releases carbonates into the tank. It is the KH (carbonate and bi-carbonate content) which provides the buffer against PH instability rather than the GH (magnesium and calcium amoung other minerals.) If your PH and KH are generally low this is a good defense against PH instability.

But what Carli was battling is something much harder to manage because her source water itself was subject to huge changes in chemistry.

Carli - did you ever find out from the water authority what was going on? They are obliged to provide you with details if you ask.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Pixifish. My problems aren't as bad but I've had to deal with some softwater/pH issues from my tap water as well (you can see in my old posts). Crushed coral isn't cutting it anymore so as I mentioned, I've resorted to adjusting the water I add to the tank....big pain, but at least it's going to prevent pH changes, I've lost goldies to those before :(

Chrissy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The coral will become exhausted after time and needs to be replaced. Is that why it's not working or do you just need more of a raise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmm, not sure. I sort of 're crushed' the coral to expose more surface area and that raised the kH again for a few days, but then it dropped. I could try getting more, but out of my tap right now the kH isn't even registering on my test scale :unsure: I used the buffer I bought and it did as promised and raised the kH, I may use that until my tap water gets back to a normal level....I probably could have achieved the same thing with baking soda, but I saw this stuff at the lfs and felt the urge to buy it

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/...showtopic=64457

Chrissy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trinket really is the person to ask about this subject. She has very little alkalinity and has become very expert in managing the fall out. My guess with your coral is that it just needs replacing - if it temporarily rose after being crushed but then fell again, I imagine it has become exhausted. How long has it been in situ? Try asking Trinket to take a look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the coral needs replacing too, it's been in there for at least 6 months. I asked somewhere if that could happen but didn't get a response, thanks! :)

Chrissy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just curious, what did you find out? I've struggled with this in the past and have resorted to adding a kH buffer to my water.

Chrissy

I just got a BS explanation from the water board. High organic load related to living in farmland, lots of runoff (blah, blah, blah), deoxygenated deep water aquifer as a source apparently requires dumping huge amounts of Chloramine, Chlorine and other chemicals into the water system in varying amounts indescriminately day to day. I found a great explanation to supplement Pixiefish's most appreciated input. If you want it I can email it to you. It explains so much. It's rather long and since I'm not sure if I can post it here I'll offer it privately.

Leaper_loverNoSpam@juno.com Remove No spam to email me.

Carli

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello.

Crushed coral is a good buffer as it gradually releases carbonates into the tank. It is the KH (carbonate and bi-carbonate content) which provides the buffer against PH instability rather than the GH (magnesium and calcium amoung other minerals.) If your PH and KH are generally low this is a good defense against PH instability.

But what Carli was battling is something much harder to manage because her source water itself was subject to huge changes in chemistry.

Carli - did you ever find out from the water authority what was going on? They are obliged to provide you with details if you ask.

I did, sort of..see my previous post. They aren't too forthcoming with information. I think they are messing up and don't want to admit it except in vague terms that don't really tell me anything. They did offer to send me a yearly water report..nice of them. I'd rather have reimbursement for the fish I lost.

Carli

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
  • Create New...