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Lolafish

Flukes Treatment

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Don't wait for signs of flukes to appear on your goldfish. Treat every new goldfish for flukes no matter where you bought him. In fact, I would treat all your goldfish at least once a year for flukes, it will not hurt them. For Goldfish Collectors with ponds, I would treat every spring and then again in the fall just before your goldfish get ready for their long winter's nap.

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Does anyone do the annual Flukes treatment? I've never heard that before.

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In an enclosed environment flukes cannot survive. If you don't bring in any new fish to your set up there is no need to treat for flukes because all the fish will have eventually built up resistance to them and the flukes will die off and or not be harmful.

Its very important to treat all fish on arrival with a dose of prazi and 0.3% salt before adding them to your fish community but after that without symptoms for me definitely not. Yes Rick sells Prazi- (he is a salesman)- a popular and nice one BUT Praziquantel products are still medication and prazi is a vetenarian antibiotic medication at that. Using it every year with no symptoms is asking for your fish to build up a resistance to an otherwise useful medication when at some point down the road when you need it most it is going to be ineffective. JMO. I have no experience with ponds-I'm thinking of tanks.

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In terms of a pond, I guess I'd treat once a year. I've never owned a pond before, but how would you tell if a pondfish had the flukes? I guess it's just a safety precaution since you can't see their behavior very well.

Edited by Nenn

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should've done that, my poor little oranda is suffering from flukes right now, poor little guy :cry1

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What Trinket said.

Lola didn't you read the chapter on Flukes in "our" book? ;)

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Every fish that comes into my house gets quarentined for at least two weeks at 80-82 degrees (F) with a saltinity of .3%. THEN after they go back to fresh water, I give them TWO treatments of Fluke Tabs before they go out to the pond or in a tank. This is standard proceedure for my fish.

I used to keep dozens of bettas and you can't believe how many of them came in with flukes. It really is out there more than you think. Salt and Fluke Tabs will take care of just about everything a fish can bring to your community. I highly recommend treating for Flukes. It's simple, doesn't take long, and will save you a whole lot of trouble. You definately do not want to be treating an entire tank full of fish after you've put a fish in that was half quarentined.... And not treating for flukes is half quarentining your fish... IMO....

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I do believe that in a truly CLOSED system, flukes can be totally erradicated....gone. But the "immunity" the the parasite that is said to occur....... I just do not see that happening, particularly. They are a parasite. The damage they cause to the gills is mechanical - and specific. Gill damage greatly affects a fish - and as it adds up, the fish take it hard.

Yes - Rick is a salesman. But he also has a point. The average fish keeper does not have a closed system. They introduce new plants, new fish, new water. They go to shows. They use new food from a new source. They buy a new tank (used sometimes). They move media around or borrow media. Flukes are everywhere. So it is the RARE keeper that can truly close their tanks/fish/system to flukes and be fluke free without some sort of intervention. For most of us, fluke treatment is a way of life.

Since I go to shows and such, I DO scope and treat for flukes on a regular basis. During a quiet winter, I only may scope and look once a month or less - if the fish are all normal. During active show season, I will scope/treat almost every week. Many fish come in with such a small load of flukes that I do not necessarily catch them on the first scoping. But, after 3-4 weeks in qt, they are very apparent.

So.... yes, constant treatment for flukes is not necessary. But constant vigilance and reaction when a parasite is spotted IS necessary. I do not think I can recall a single year that I did not have at least ONE round of flukes in at least one collection of fish!!!! They are nasty and sneaky. But, with Prazi or PP bathes, controlable. Thank goodness.

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Daryl and Rick are right.

I had a closed off 45 gal tank, no new fish, no new anything but the hose to syphon the tank with was shared with guppies and another goldfish tank that did get 3 new babies. BAM Pharoh got flukes and before I could do anything he was so week and one gill so filled with them I lost him and had to place him down. So please guys its important dont think that your fish cant get anything, the older they get the harder it is on them.... :(

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I have a question about something Daryl said:

She said that "they use new food from a new source". Could this cause flukes? I mean, I have recently had my fish on Medi-Gold from Rick's. Also, the eat Pro-Gold from Ricks. I also introduce new veggis, like spinach and others from the grocery store. Of course, I wash everything first, and usually nuke it in the micrwave (veggis), but I was wondering if my fish can get flukes from this? What is I get freezedried bloodworms from the store? Can flukes be carried in this?

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Well, I wrote a nice, rather longish reply this morning, only to have the internet toss me off and lose it all. :( I hate that. I will see if I can get this to post.

First - flukes are a parasite - monogenetic trematodes generically speaking. There are a number of different types of flukes - divided generally into two categories - the "skin flukes" and the "gill flukes". Flukes are seen on just about every type of fish - fresh water, brackish and marine. They are the equivilant to cockroaches in our world - I swear you could nuke the world and cockroaches and flukes would still be around!

Flukes are not particularly small - they can be seen with a low powered microscope. It is not difficult to indentify them either. I am remarkably bad at scoping - yet I have no difficulty identifying flukes under my lens! They have particularly nasty looking hooks on their ends - that they use to dig into their host. This identifying feature makes them easy to see.

A fish infested with flukes can show many symptoms...... they are widely varied depending on the fish - the flukes and other problems that always go hand in hand with parasites. A fluke infestation can leave a fish open to opportunistic bacterial infection. A fluke infestation can stress a fish - lowering immunities to anything that may be in the environment - from other parasites to virus, bacteria or even simple egg impaction, constipation, underweight lethargy, etc. They are usually the tip of the iceberg when you have a fish presenting with general idiopathic "lack of health".

Flukes are very very very common. I feel that in a truly closed system, you CAN erradicate flukes. BUT, because they are so common and cover such a wide spread number of hosts, it is nearly impossible to truly close most systems.

As far as food - any processed food such as ProGold, MediGold, Spirilana flakes, or Hikari pellets or such will not carry flukes. They require a host to survive long term. They also do not remain viable when dried.... so freeze dried foods would also not be source of flukes. Vegetables and herbs, grown in the air of your garden (or a farm to the store) will not be a source of flukes, either. They are an aquatic creature - so need a source of water and a host. IT is always advisable to carefully wash any foods you use - for you or you fish - for there are many things that can be transmitted. Flukes, however, are not one of those things.

Since I show fish, I see plenty of flukes. They are easily transfered from fish to fish, tank to tank by the simplest thing as a droplet of water. All it takes it a tiny tiny drop to transfer. One of the most common places I find nasties is between the layers of a double bagged fish. The inner bag has been dipped in the original water source - and the parasites are kept alive in the damp environment between the layers of plastic. All bags should be sterilized before reuse! Plants, snails, decorations, equipment, hands, spashes, fingers in a pot of food from one tank to another are all common ways of transfering flukes.

Flukes can successfully "hide" from treatment in a cannister filter that is not serviced often enough. They also can hide in a deep gravel base in the bottom of the tank. They have several life stages where they are off the fish - and at these times, they are easy to transfer!

I frequently will bathe a fish in PP then use a tub to tub method to clear it of parasites. The PP will knock off some adults, and the 100% water replacement will leave the juveniles behind. Sterilzation of the tubs between moving is a must.

Many flukes these days have developed a semi-resistance to salt. Some always seem to survive 0.3% salt. I often will use salt and Prazi to kill the flukes. MEchanical removal (PP is a great oxidizer and killer of surface parasites)is something no creature can develop a resistance to - so I use it whenever possible. A combination of PP, salt and Prazi is usually good.

Many fish will live with a low level of parasites. They may not grow as well, or breed as well, and definately are more open to other problems that can come along, but the flukes may not be the actual killer.

I think that about covers what I said this morning. Not nearly as efficiantly or clearly, but..... well, such is life. I personally hate those nastie flukes. But, with careful management and treatment, you can prevent them from becoming too much of a health problem for your fish.

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That does it. I'm getting a microscope. How powerful of a one do we need?

Me too! It is gonna be on my X-mas wish list from my family! I bet my fish have flukes now and I don't even know it, either that or some kind of parasite! Ugh! I mean, they seem healthy, but who knows????

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I bet my fish have flukes now and I don't even know it, either that or some kind of parasite!

Can we say PARANOIA? :rofl

Anything for peace of mind. :yeah:

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Yes; I do a once a year treatment for flukes:

There is no chance of resistance development with this double-eged treatment.

I use Prazi ( Praziquantel ). In fact it is recommended as a once a year preventative.

( pratz-eh-KWON-tel )

Praziquantel ( ?Prazi? ) is a great treatment for flukes. gentle effective . The real bonus with ?Prazi? is that when you treat for flukes it also rids the fish of any internal parasites or worms.

One treatment, not two - No water changes needed - Safe for all species of non food fish including Orfe, Goldfish and Rudd.

No filter or reef bio-filter effects - Deworms cestodes, anasakis, capillaria and other intestinal parasites as well!

Prazi? is extremely effective for treatment of external flukes, liver flukes, internal parasites and internal worms in koi, goldfish and tropical fish. No water changes after treatment and you do NOT need to bypass your biofilter. Prazi is not water temperature dependant.

Prazi is safe with all species of fish.

It is also 100% ?legal? unlike some of the grey market compounds.

Daryl was correct in maintaining that Dimilin is not effective against Flukes. The studies suggest it's effectivity not in line for registration.

However; I do a double treatment at one time once a year, with Prazi and Dimilin - it is not the *only* weapon against crustacea (Anchor Worm and Fish Lice) anymore; as far as I know. There are now sister compounds. For all cases - the members of this family - safety and effectivity is unparalled. Dimilin is effective, yes. But hard to get. API is comming out with the product; API's Dimilin.

Anchors Away eliminates Argulus (fish lice) and Lernea (anchor worm)within a week at coldwater temperatures, and much faster when water temperatures are in the seventies.

just about all the IDI's will stop thedevelopment of crustacean parasites in Koi and Goldfish. Diflubenzuron (Anchor's Away) is an easy to measure powder. It's an insect development inhibitor and chitin synthesis inhibitor.

At the same time, Overdosage is patently impossible. No reapplication is usually needed.

This is not a shot gun attempt. The problem with these infections is that it is usually to late once you find out your aquapuppies have a problem...

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P.S. Daryl - I was not questioning your accurate info; IN my background - I do trhe double take - thank you for your correction on the Flukers with the Dimilin - As for the Prazi - right on as a top notch product....with the Praz1 1/2 gram treats 50 gallon with a wide margin of safety.

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I bet my fish have flukes now and I don't even know it, either that or some kind of parasite!

Can we say PARANOIA? :rofl

Anything for peace of mind. :yeah:

Amen, Sister!!!

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Lola didn't you read the chapter on Flukes in "our" book? ;)

Don't shoot the messenger! :rofl I was just wondering what other people do.

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Agreed - the moment the book is published - there is something new to be learned that is not in the book

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Just to give some resistance parameters that have been claimed lately:

Salt resistance has arisen in the following parasites:

Flukes - 20% of cases are completely resistant to salt treatments at any level. Most cases are cleared at zero-point-nine-percent but less than thirty percent still clear off at the old zero-point- three-percent standby level.

Trichodina - 20% of Trichodina cases do not clear at even zero-point-six-percent. There are rare cases where trichodina does not clear even at zero-point-nine-percent which is also stressful to the fish. Formalin or potassium permanganate are recommended.

Chilodonella and Ich have never been recorded as being salt resistant in the least bit.

Costia has shown some resistance and it is part of the reason for this article.

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