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FatGoldFishGuy

Stocking Levels

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One should NEVER base their stocking levels BY GALLONS OF WATER or LENGTH OF THEIR GOLDFISH!

Goldfish produce waste and ammonia based on their weight, not their length. Their weight dramatically increases as they grow in length.

So, the larger they get, the more waste is created. Goldfish produce approximately .3 of their weight in waste per day!!!

A good comparison is this example:

If one was lucky enough to have a 10" goldfish, it should have an approximate body mass of 9.70 ounces. A single 2" fish only weights .08 ounces, so even if you stocked ten 2" goldfish, they would only have a combined weight of .8 ounces. The 10" goldfish will produces .91 ounces of waste per day, but the ten 2" goldfish combined produce only .24 ounces.

Goldfish Length 1" Approximate Weight in Oz .01 Approximate Weight in Grams .28

Goldfish Length 2" Approximate Weight in Oz .08 Approximate Weight in Grams 2.27

Goldfish Length 3" Approximate Weight in Oz .26 Approximate Weight in Grams 7.37

Goldfish Length 4" Approximate Weight in Oz .62 Approximate Weight in Grams 17.58

Goldfish Length 5" Approximate Weight in Oz 1.21 Approximate Weight in Grams 34.30

Goldfish Length 6" Approximate Weight in Oz 2.09 Approximate Weight in Grams 59.25

Goldfish Length 7" Approximate Weight in Oz 3.33 Approximate Weight in Grams 94.40

Goldfish Length 8" Approximate Weight in Oz 4.96 Approximate Weight in Grams 140.61

Goldfish Length 9" Approximate Weight in Oz 7.07 Approximate Weight in Grams 200.43

Goldfish Length 10" Approximate Weight in Oz 9.70 Approximate Weight in Grams 274.99

Goldfish Length 12" Approximate Weight in Oz 16.76 Approximate Weight in Grams 475.14

So what does this mean in layman's terms?

The 10 gallon rule is a good place to start with, but by no means is it accurate for long term success.

As one can see from the example above, the bio load of one single 5" goldie is equal to fifteen 2" goldfish. Knowing these facts it is simple to see that neither choice would be suitable to keep in a 10 gallon tank.

We all need to use common sense when it comes to stocking our tanks. If you have a 5" plus goldie, you should not even think about keeping it in anything smaller than say a 20 or 30 gallon tank. On the flip side, if you have a 2" rescue fish, you should not sweat it if the only tank you can keep it in is a 5 gallons.

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thanks for your explaination! your chart clearly shows what you're talking about. :)

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Guest Dico

WOW superb! great research.

Will you be producing a similar report regarding fantails? because surely that works out a bit different.

I look forward to reading any future work of yours.

Chris

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Nice work and very interesting!! :exactly

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Hi,

Good collection of weights of different lengths of fish!!

Not sure I agree with your conclusion that a 5" goldfish shouldn't be kept in a 10g. Are you sure a 10g tank with over 100gph filtration can't cope with a 5" moor?

I can understand your reasoning for single tailed fish to be kept in 20g minimum, but that would be on swimming space and not bio-load.

Slugger :)

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Good research hun when I get the chance I will place it on the site and give you an award

:D

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Average weight of fancy? Of common?

A 3 inch ranchu will weigh up to 3 times or more than a 3 inch shubie or comet. It will make 3 times or more waste, too.

This would work better if the ratio of length vs. weight were more universal, but with the gross differences in body conformation between various breeds of fancies, it can be dramatically misleading.

In theory it is very good. In practice it will take many adendums and additional factors considered before it works, though.

???????????

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I agree with you that weight goes up dramatically with length. In theory, if a fish maintains the same proportions as he grows, he should be 8 times as heavy once he's twice as long!

I don't know how the table of length versus weight was made. However, I have some empirical measurements to compare against. I've been weighing my fish. For orandas, I found that a 2" fish weighs about 10 grams. 3" about 25 grams. 6" about 80 grams.

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I just came across this thread, and all I can say is :goodpost

I've often felt that one should base the size of the tank on the waste output of the fish, that "10 gallons" per goldy, although good for basic small fancy owning is good, but I most certainly wouldn't dream of keeping my larger goldies in a space that small. I also feel that if smaller fish are kept in smaller environments, as long as the water is properly maintained (ie regular water changes/filtration) and the fish are moved to larger tanks as they out grow the smaller tanks, it's not a death sentence.

So by looking at the data, just as a reference point, the weight (and to extrapolate, waste output) of a goldfish seems to increase exponentially against the length of the fish... I like it! :yeah:

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I really like that, it makes sense.

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