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Mr. Goldfish

What Kind Of Goldfish Are Out There.

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.There are many kinds of goldfish out, in this report you will learn about some of the more popular goldfish.

1. The comet goldfish.

The comet goldfish is the only goldfish to have originated in the United States.

It was bred during the 1880's by the U.S Fisheries Department. This fish has the same body type as the common goldfish, but it is a bit longer and sleeker. The fins are also longer and should be as large or larger that it's body. This fish is very hardy and can withstand temperature as low as 40 degrees and as high as 80 degrees. The comet is also a bit smaller than the common goldfish. The average life of the comet is 5 years to 20 years if properly maintained. It is available in orange, white, and yellow.

2 The Shubunkin

This goldfish is thought to be bred in Japan around the turn of the centaury. The Shubunkin is basically the calico version of the comet goldfish. It is available in reds, yellow, whites and dark blues. The Shubunkin is smaller than most goldfish; the maximum length is about 6 inches. They are very strong and need a big tank to thrive.

3. The Fantail.

The Fantail is one of the oldest goldfish breed known to man. It is called lancho in Chinese. The body type is shaped like an egg and should have a doubled tail. It is one of the most popular goldfish to be sold in stores? The best specimens should have a conjoined tail and should be symmetrical on each tail. These fish are also very hardy and can withstand temperatures as low as 40 and as high as 80 but the temperature should be around 62 and 69 degrees.

4. The Ryunkin.

The Ryunkin is the Japanese version of the fantail. This goldfish is different because of the hump on its back. The tail is also wider, meaning that it becomes longer vertically instead of horizontally. The Ryunkin can grow between 3 inches to 6 inches. This fish is perfect as a beginner fish, or as a pond fish. It can withstand temperatures between 40 to 80 degrees.

5. The Veltail.

The origin is unavailable for this fish, but some have debated that it is a mutation of the fantail. One feature about this fish is that its dorsal fin is very high. The other fins are generally long and extended like tore up ribbon. There should be no forks in the tail. The fins are not too delicate but it should be kept in clean water without tooo many fish or plants. Their fins are susceptible to fungus and fin rot. They live around 4 to 10 years.

6. The Oradona

The Orandona is a crossbreed of a Veiltain and a lion head. It has a bumpy growth on its head that looks like a big wart. It should not cover its nostrils though. The shape of its body is a round egg type. There are many colors to choose from like red, yellow, black, and blues. It is said that the more blues and blacks the more valuable the fish ought to be.

7. The Pearl scale.

The Pearl scale looks like the fantail but it is shorter and fatter, the back should have a high hump on its back. The scales look like bumps sticking out. Many breeders say the bigger the bump the more the fish is worth. If the scales come off from fighting they will grow back, but they will be flat. This fish should have good acceleration to thrive. Temperatures should be around 49 to 69 degrees in order for it to thrive.

8. The Telescope

These fish are known for their well, eyes! These fish have limited eye sight and should be kept with handicapped fish only. In some adult telescope goldfish their eyes can protrude up to 3/4 of an inch. These fish are susceptible to disease. They can grow up to 5 to 7 inches and can live up to 2 to 20 years. Temperature should range about 50 to 70 degrees.

9. The black moor

The black moor is basically the back version of the telescope goldfish. The only difference is the black moor is only available in black.

10. The Ranchu

This goldfish looks like a puffed up Oradona. It does not have a dorsal fin so it should not be kept with fish that have a dorsal fin not even a black moor. The water should be well accelerated and very clean. This fish comes in orange, red, yellow, and silver. The life span is around 5 to 16 years. The temperature should be around 59 to 69 degrees.

11. The loin head.

The loin head is the Chinese version is the Chinese version of the rancho. It has a border back with no dorsal fin. It has a dual tail and should be a bit larger than normal dorsal fins

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Theres alot more :lol:

Tosakin tail(which is VERY popular but rare)

A type of goldfish believed to have evolved off the ryukin and have both tails connected

(you can see one on my signature which is my dragon eye tosakin)

Bubble eye

A dorsal-less type with sacs under its eyes which contains fluid and is rather delicate

celestial

which has eyes that resembles telescopes but is pointed upword

PonPom (one of my favorite types)

Which has enormous nasal septas which can either come in 2-4

And ALOt more with cross breeding.

Too bad though my ponpom and dragon eye tosakin are both females can't cross breed the types yet :cry1

Edited by maniacholic

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Theres alot more

Dear Maniacholic,

Yes I do know that there is alote more, but the type of common goldfish I'm talking about is kind you can find at EVREY store like mmm and vvvv. Here's all the goldfish I found in my research, there's some in this list I've never heard of!!

Argard's Wander Goldfish

Albino Goldfish

American Common Goldfish

Barnacled Telescope Goldfish

Black Goldfish

Black Moor Goldfish

Black Lionhead Goldfish

Bristal Shubunkin Goldfish

Brocaded Goldfish

Bubble-eyed Goldfish

Calico Common Goldfish

Celestial Telescope Goldfish

Chinese Blue Telescope Goldfish

Chinese Marigold Lionhead Goldfish

Chinese Tumbler Goldfish

Clown Goldfish

Colorless Goldfish

Comet Goldfish

Curled-grill goldfish

Dice or Tumbler Goldfish

Dolphin-tailed Goldfish

Dolphin-tailed Telescope Goldfish

Egg Fish Goldfish

European Goldfish

Fantailed Golbe Goldfish

Fantailed Goldfish

Fantailed Nymph Goldfish

Fantailed Pumpkin Goldfish

Fringe-tailed Goldfish

AND THE LIST GOES ON AND ON AND ON........................... :krazy:

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truth be told lots of goldfishes you mentioned on your second post are the same i just hope that you know :rolleyes: for example veil-tail=fringe tail vice versa that reminds i still haven't posted the picture for my veiltail

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im just saying some of the names you mentioned is just an alias for the SAME type, its like calling a dog a canine

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There are many kinds of goldfish out, in this report you will learn about some of the more popular goldfish.

1. The Comet goldfish.

? ?? The comet goldfish is the only goldfish to have originated in the United States.

It was bred during the 1880's by the U.S Fisheries Department. This fish has the same body type as the common goldfish, but it is a bit longer and sleeker. The fins are also longer and should be as large or larger that it's body. This fish is very hardy and can withstand temperature as low as 40 degrees and as high as 80 degrees. The comet is also a bit smaller than the common goldfish. The average life of the comet is 5 years to 20 years if properly maintained. It is available in orange, white, and yellow.

2 The Shubunkin

?? This goldfish is thought to be bred in Japan around the turn of the centaury. The Shubunkin is basically the calico version of the comet goldfish. It is available in reds, yellow, whites and dark blues. They are very strong and need a big tank to thrive.

3. The Fantail.

?? The Fantail is one of the oldest goldfish breed known to man. It is called lancho in Chinese. The body type is shaped like an egg and should have a doubled tail. It is one of the most popular goldfish to be sold in stores? The best specimens should have a conjoined tail and should be symmetrical on each tail. These fish are also very hardy and can withstand temperatures as low as 40 and as high as 80 but the temperature should be around 70 and 78 degrees.

4. The Ryukin.

?? The Ryukin is the Japanese version of the fantail. This goldfish is different because of the hump on its back. The tail is also wider, meaning that it becomes longer vertically instead of horizontally. The Ryukin can grow between 3 inches to 6 inches. This fish is perfect as a beginner fish, or as a pond fish. It can withstand temperatures between 40 to 80 degrees.

5. The Veiltail.

? ? The origin is unavailable for this fish, but some have debated that it is a mutation of the fantail. One feature about this fish is that its dorsal fin is very high. The other fins are generally long and extended like tore up ribbon. There should be no forks in the tail. The fins are not too delicate but it should be kept in clean water without tooo many fish or plants. Their fins are susceptible to fungus and fin rot. They live around 4 to 10 years.

6. The Oranda

? ? The Oranda is a crossbreed of a Veiltain and a lion head. It has a bumpy growth on its head that looks like a big wart. It should not cover its nostrils though. The shape of its body is a round egg type. There are many colors to choose from like red, yellow, black, and blues. It is said that the more blues and blacks the more valuable the fish ought to be.

7. The Pearlscale.

The Pearl scale looks like the fantail but it is shorter and fatter, the back should have a high hump on its back. The scales look like bumps sticking out. Many breeders say the bigger the bump the more the fish is worth. If the scales come off from fighting they will grow back, but they will be flat. This fish should have good acceleration to thrive.

8. The Telescope

?? These fish are known for their well, eyes! These fish have limited eye sight and should be kept with handicapped fish only. In some adult telescope goldfish their eyes can protrude up to 3/4 of an inch. These fish are susceptible to disease. They can grow up to 5 to 7 inches and can live up to 2 to 20 years.

9. The Black moor

The black moor is basically the back version of the telescope goldfish. The only difference is the black moor is only available in black.

10. The Ranchu

?? This goldfish looks like a puffed up Orada. It does not have a dorsal fin so it should not be kept with fish that have a dorsal fin not even a black moor. The water should be well accelerated and very clean. This fish comes in orange, red, yellow, and silver. The life span is around 5 to 16 years. The temperature should be around 59 to 69 degrees.

11. The Lion head.

? ?? The lion head is the Chinese version is the Chinese version of the ranchu. It has a border back with no dorsal fin. It has a dual tail and should be a bit larger than normal dorsal fins

Edited for spelling and your temperatures were way off. Anything lower than 60 degrees and goldfish metabolism slows down, they move very little and they almost stop eating (sort of like hibernating)

Also, you didn't mention the curved back and tail tuck of the ranchu, essential for any show quality fish.

Jikins, wakins, tosakins, commons, pheonixes, bubble eyes and any other celestials aren't mentioned in there at all (no they aren't "made up species from petstores" either). There are some obscure ones like the azu-[something I can't pronounce] but they aren't too common place.

Yes I do know that there is alote more, but the type of common goldfish I'm talking about is kind you can find at EVREY store like mmm and vvvv. Here's all the goldfish I found in my research, there's some in this list I've never heard of!!

Play by play, excluding the ones you've added to your list.

Argard's Wander Goldfish-Haven't heard of. No comment.

Albino Goldfish-Not really a species, it's more like a trait.

American Common Goldfish-Commons, yeah.

Barnacled Telescope Goldfish-Haven't heard of. No comment.

Black Goldfish-That's a colour, though it's probably blue and not black.

Black Lionhead Goldfish-See above.

Bristal Shubunkin Goldfish-It's actually bristol shubunkin but yeah, it probably could be classified as a seperate variety. I'll leave that to the philosiphors

Brocaded Goldfish-Haven't heard of. No comment.

Bubble-eyed Goldfish-Yes, that should be in there.

Calico Common Goldfish-See the point on black lionhead.

Celestial Telescope Goldfish-See Bubble-eyes.

Chinese Blue Telescope Goldfish-See the point on calico common.

Chinese Marigold Lionhead Goldfish-Haven't heard of. No comment.

Chinese Tumbler Goldfish-Haven't heard of. No comment.

Clown Goldfish-Haven't heard of. No comment.

Colorless Goldfish-Probably Albino, or just white.

Curled-grill goldfish-That's more of a genetic "defect" that a seperate variety. I think it was mentioned on Bristol Aquariasts though.

Dice or Tumbler Goldfish-Haven't heard of. No comment.

Dolphin-tailed Goldfish-You can't classify that in a catagory of it's own with out adding stuff like "Calico broad-tail telescope", "Orange broadtail telescope", "Red/orange broadtail telescope", "Calico butterfly telescope", "Orange butterfly telescope", etc. There's a point of too much specifics. You wouldn't classifly cars into "Red v4 honda civic", "Black v4 honda civic", "White v4 honda civic", "Red v6 honda civic", etc.

Dolphin-tailed Telescope Goldfish-See above.

Egg Fish Goldfish-Pheonixes. Yes they are a type, though as rare as veiltails.

European Goldfish-*smacks forehead*

Fantailed Golbe Goldfish-See point on dolphined tail telescope. Also, globe goldfish are just telescopes.

Fantailed Goldfish-Self explanatory I would think.

Fantailed Nymph Goldfish-Haven't heard of. No comment.

Fantailed Pumpkin Goldfish-Haven't heard of. No comment.

Fringe-tailed Goldfish-See point on fantailed globe goldfish.

Btw, I'm open to arguement, I like a good debate. :)

Edited by Fishbert

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Not really a species, it's more like a trait.

I don't believe any of those are different species, but rather they are breeds. Like a poodle and a wolfhound are the same species but different breeds.

Anything lower than 60 degrees and goldfish metabolism slows down, they move very little and they almost stop eating (sort of like hibernating)

Perhaps it depends on the variety...but I have been looking at the kinds of temperatures these guys were developed in, and it's not always warm. I don't want to start a flame war or anything but I have to agree, the original posted temperature range is what I have heard quoted for ranchus from other sources.

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Not really a species, it's more like a trait.

I don't believe any of those are different species, but rather they are breeds. Like a poodle and a wolfhound are the same species but different breeds.

Oops, my bad. I meant to say that. Yeah.

Anything lower than 60 degrees and goldfish metabolism slows down, they move very little and they almost stop eating (sort of like hibernating)

Perhaps it depends on the variety...but I have been looking at the kinds of temperatures these guys were developed in, and it's not always warm. I don't want to start a flame war or anything but I have to agree, the original posted temperature range is what I have heard quoted for ranchus from other sources.

The temperatures they were developed in may not be indicitive of what temperature they do best in. Also, goldfish breed in early spring when temperature slowly rise so that may be why they were first raised in lower temperatures.

Hess, Richard E., and Eric L. Johnson. Fancy Goldfish. 2nd ed. Trumbull: Weatherhill, 2004. 171.

The complete paragraph:

As temperature drops the fish also become less active, and the amount of food muct be reduced accordingly. Below 50 degrees the fish should be fed sparingly or not at all, and as the temperature drops lower all feeding should be stopped. The fish will enter hibernation, durin which they will swim around very slowly or become nearly motionless.

Those are reputable people that wrote that book (Eric Johnson from Koivet and Rick Hess from Goldfishconnection). Since they are in the ranchu breeding section, I'll assume that they apply to ranchus.

Edited by Fishbert

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They actually apply to all kinds of goldfish, as well as koi. A koi pond in anything colder than, say 55 degrees, doesn't need to be fed, since they do not metabolize the food anymore, and its just gonna rot in the intestines. The fish might still beg, but no food has to be given, if you don't wonna kill the fish.

When it gets even colder than that, the fish sits motionless no the bottom of his tank or pond, and can remain like this for weeks to come. It does not harm the fish, it is rather essential for him. Any eggs inside a female will be reabsorbed during that time, and she is all ready to go and produce some more when the spring weather comes around. A cooling period is also essential for any breeding project in the spring.

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I live in VA and there were koi in the house's pond when I moved in...all 1-2' long. They are not fancy, they are just kind of blah looking and I didn't know they were koi at first, but they are active all year round? They must be a different type or something. The pond freezes over up to 2" thick in the winter and if you break the ice on the side they will come up and look at you, so they may not eat much but they are active...there is a nice one in there with big plate scales on its side, it is about 2.5' at this point. They ate the fancy baby koi I tried to put in at age 10 before I knew anything about fish :blink:

As a person with a pretty heavy biology background, I'm a bit dubious of the debate between whether a fish does best in a temperature it was not adapted for...I started going that approach with snail to begin with and have since changed my mind slightly. Snails are one of those animals that does "well" in water that is up to 84 degrees, but they only live 1 year and live really fast. 82-84 is when they have the prettiest shells...even some are more succeptable to diseases in that situation. Which way is best, I don't know. I havn't made up my mind with fish yet either, but I have found decent evidence on both sides, and no conclusive evidence on either side, so I'm still open to a lot of learning. Just for the record I havn't put my goldie in ice water to test it so I am not advocating anything that might be cruel lol.

I hope I havn't just derailed this thread...appologies if I have. The temperature and goldfish issue is one of those things that I am looking into and it interests me from a biological standpoint.

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I hope I havn't just derailed this thread...appologies if I have. The temperature and goldfish issue is one of those things that I am looking into and it interests me from a biological standpoint.

No carry on, it's good to see both sides of a debate. ;)

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I really screwed up in this article :( I'm going to cry all day! ) :cry1:cry1 LOL

Well, at least it's pleasing to whatch people debate about my article! :yeah:

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