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CaseyE

Pothos question.

9 posts in this topic

I’ve just been told on FB that GF can die if they eat pothos roots, is this true? 36be9fd0d3deca47c65be11e9530af4b.jpg

 

 

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No.  Completely false.

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Pothos isn’t toxic to them :)

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The only thing I have seen or heard of was a member here that had some of her Pothos plant's roots starting to rot in the tank and her fish had some issues. But I agree with the two before me. :)  

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I’ve heard cats and dogs shouldn’t eat it. Never had an issue with the fish though. I have a giant one with roots submerged in my patio pond and the fish are always hiding under it. I bet the nibble it too. Healthy as horses.


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12 hours ago, happysnapper said:

I’ve heard cats and dogs shouldn’t eat it.


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That is true too, it is toxic to cats and dogs :o 

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The oxalic acid in the leaves is one of the most widespread plant toxins.  It works very well because it irritates the mouth, causing the eater to spit it out and avoid that plant in the future.  Most people know that rhubarb leaves can make you sick, while the stems will not.  Oxalic acid concentrates in the leaves. Chew a piece of a leaf and you can see why these leaves rarely get eaten, even by bugs.

Toxic means that it causes a negative effect when eaten.  In the case of philadendrons like pothos, the negative effect is mouth irritation, drooling and spitting it out.  Here's a veterinarian's response:

https://www.justanswer.com/veterinary/4yd9m-dog-eaten-devils-ivy-scindapsus-aureus.html

 

 

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1 hour ago, shakaho said:

The oxalic acid in the leaves is one of the most widespread plant toxins.  It works very well because it irritates the mouth, causing the eater to spit it out and avoid that plant in the future.  Most people know that rhubarb leaves can make you sick, while the stems will not.  Oxalic acid concentrates in the leaves. Chew a piece of a leaf and you can see why these leaves rarely get eaten, even by bugs.

Toxic means that it causes a negative effect when eaten.  In the case of philadendrons like pothos, the negative effect is mouth irritation, drooling and spitting it out.  Here's a veterinarian's response:

https://www.justanswer.com/veterinary/4yd9m-dog-eaten-devils-ivy-scindapsus-aureus.html

 

 

You took the words right out of my mouth :thumbs: 

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Thanks everyone!


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