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GrayGoldfish

Mix of goldfish varieties or single type only?

5 posts in this topic

Just wanting to have a bit of a discussion around what kind of fish I should get. I still haven't decided on what size tank I want and all of that. Currently doing house renovations, so nothing can happen until that's finished anyway. 

I really only have room for one tank - and if I'm honest, I can only handle the maintenance, electricity and water bill for one tank.

I have had goldfish in the past, and I love them so much. I had all Orandas (my personal favourite), but I don't think I want to do that this time around. I mainly had it that way because I *kind of* wanted to breed them, and I didn't want the babies to be all crazy different types. I don't care about that now, I have no desire to have baby fish. I mean if my fish spawned, I would probably try to grow them up and keep a couple, but I certainly won't be encouraging it. 

 

Anywho, I would love to see some pictures/opinions of those who have multiple varieties in one tank. And what kinds of varieties go well together so that they are not bullying or out-competing one another for food?

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IMO you can mix multiple varieties togethor. IMO its best if bubble eyes and celestial stay away from other double tail varieties, but I do think all others make good tank mates with eachother. Just ensure all are getting their fair share of food.


(And stay away from single tails with doubles IMO)

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Follow our guideline of 20 gallons per fish.  Avoid tall tanks and try to have at least 2 square feet of surface area per fish.    A 40B comes close to ideal for 2 goldfish.  

The fewer the mutations, the more likely the fish will live a long healthy life.

Competition for food can (but doesn't often) become a problem when some of your fish have vision problems.  These include telescopes, celestials, and fish that have wens that grow over their eyes.  Some fish feed more aggressively  than others and this has little to nothing to do with variety or swimming speed. 

If you have both males and females, make sure the females are of more vigorous varieties than the males.  Spawning can get really rough, and a big strong male can injure a weaker female.  Better yet, have an all male or all female tank.

 

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I've had no problem keeping different varieties together, even single tails/double tails. 

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I mix them all up, and just keep an eye on everyone to make sure my slower fish are getting enough food.  It’s never been an issue.

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