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EvilVegan

Bottom of tank drains to sump, generating proper flow with air? [Design/physics question]

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Hey all,

 

I'm designing an aquarium filter thingy and I want to have returns that pull water from the bottom of the tank rather than skimming the top (growing duckweed = no skimmer).  I was thinking of having 4 pipes with their intakes pointed downwards and little fenced off ramps (made with styrofoam and kwikrete) to pull solid waste up.

 

Will the sump/return pump provide enough lift to get solids up the pipe, and will adding an airstone below the openings help? There's no siphon, just an open S/T at the top to raise the water level.  Anyone know much about pressure/flow/fluid dynamics?

4DWX1gr.png

 

All this garbage is going to be hidden/built in to a 3d background, like this one: http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a-3D-Aquarium-Background/?ALLSTEPS

Edited by EvilVegan

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What's a S/T?

 

It can be done by creating a continuous siphon into a container next to the tank.  

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An S trap is like a p trap, but has an extra bend, the T is a coupling.  I should've been clearer.  It goes up then down and has an open part at the top to let airbubbles out and to let water in if the water level rises and the intakes are blocked...

 

Siphons scare me, are they the only way to create enough pressure?

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I do not think this will drain unless it is under siphon, and that would probably not be advised as it could drain your entire tank if something went wrong.

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If you put a container at the same height as your tank next to the tank and set up a siphon between the tank and the container, it cannot drain the tank.  You should put a guard over the end in the tank to protect the fish.  (I have done this using a holey pipe across the bottom of the tank to take up the dirty water.  I also use siphons to overflow container ponds into buckets.) 

 

You can then use one of

to move the water to the sump.  The intake to the overflow device is at water level, so it cannot drain the tank.

 

A pump in the sump can then return the filtered water to the tank, raising the water level in the tank, which raises the water level in the container, which makes the water in the container overflow to the sump.

 

This works well in a bare bottom tank, but I don't think it could overcome the debris-collecting ability of that 3-D background.  :)

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If you put a container at the same height as your tank next to the tank and set up a siphon between the tank and the container, it cannot drain the tank.  You should put a guard over the end in the tank to protect the fish.  (I have done this using a holey pipe across the bottom of the tank to take up the dirty water.  I also use siphons to overflow container ponds into buckets.) 

 

You can then use one of

to move the water to the sump.  The intake to the overflow device is at water level, so it cannot drain the tank.

 

A pump in the sump can then return the filtered water to the tank, raising the water level in the tank, which raises the water level in the container, which makes the water in the container overflow to the sump.

 

This works well in a bare bottom tank, but I don't think it could overcome the debris-collecting ability of that 3-D background.   :)

Yeah I got most of my build ideas from Joey.  I was going to use little eggrate bits to look like a old-timey sewer grate.

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