Jump to content
Pic of the week


Pic of the week poll #14
Pixo

Biology Homework - Need Help (yes, it relates to goldfish)

15 posts in this topic

Hi,

 

My name's Pixo and I've heard of this place from my friend so I decided to give it a try. So, for my Biology homework, I have to choose two organisms from different kingdoms and keep them alive inside the classroom for a month. So, I decided to use a goldfish and an aquatic plant. I know the basics such as having a big enough tank, mine is 20 gallons, and a filter to fit that tank. How many gallons per hour should my filter, well, filter? I'm also equipping my tank with some decorations that will be rinsed before put in the tank and I'm using pellets instead of flakes so they don't gulp air when they eat. Now, for my plant I'm not really sure yet. Does anyone know a common freshwater plant that can go well in a tank with goldfish? And if I need to have anything else, please tell me.

 

Thanks,

Pixo

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh and also, forgot to mention the breed I'm getting. I'm planning on getting a Red Cap Oranda and if that's not there then a Pearl Scale or a Fan Tail. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Pixo! Welcome to the forum!

The general rule for filters is 8-10 times the size of the tank--so 160 to 200 gallons per hour. More is better with goldfish, as long as the current isn't tossing them around. Do you know about the nitrogen cycle?

For plants I would pick Anubias or Java Fern. They're hardy and can stand the nibbling from the goldfish, they're low-light so they'll probably do fine in a classroom, and they can usually get along ok without fertilizer.

I'm sure that others with more experience than me will have suggestions, too.

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, you have to deal with water quality.  I assume your school has city water treated with chlorine. Thus you need a water conditioner to neutralize the chlorine.  Get Seachem Prime, which has another use as well.

 

Your fish will produce ammonia, a deadly toxin.  In a natural system, nitrifying bacteria/archaea convert this to nitrite (also highly toxic), and then to the much less toxic nitrate, a process called nitrification.  You can read about this in your textbook and get more detailed info on line.

 

Unfortunately, establishing a population of nitrifiers adequate to keep the fish safe from ammonia/nitrite poisoning takes about a month.  Thus you will have to do daily water changes to remove these toxins.  You will need a test kit to determine how much ammonia/nitrite you have in the tank.  The Prime will protect the fish from up to 1ppm ammonia/nitrite.  You must use water changes to keep the ammonia/nitrite from getting higher than that.

 

If you know someone with a healthy fish tank, you might be able to get some of their biomedium to put in your filter.  This will contain nitrifiers, although probably not enough to use all of the ammonia your fish produces.

 

Since this project requires you to keep the fish alive, I suggest you get a small common/comet goldfish rather than an oranda.  Don't get a pearlscale.  If you feel you must use a fancy goldfish, get a tiny fantail.  The smaller the fish, the less ammonia it produces, and the fewer mutations the fish has, the more likely it can survive in less than ideal conditions.  

Edited by shakaho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to Kokos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting project.  Please keep us posted!  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take what Shakaho said seriously. 

 

A water conditioner like Prime is a necessity in your case.  So are water changes.  Maybe double the dose of Prime over the weekends?  (Are there any vacations scheduled that will keep you out of the building for longer than two days?)

 

When you do the daily water changes, make sure the tap water is the same temp as the tank water.  I would probably fill buckets a day ahead every day to let the temps equalize.  I usually do a 50 percent change daily for a new quarantine fish, but I've never worked with just twenty gallons before...check the guidelines for care on this forum.

 

Get a cover (secure it if possible) for the tank so people don't do random stupid things like try to feed the fish.  Also, err on the side of under feeding.

 

Are you going to make a pet of the fish when the project is over?

 

(Please overlook typos/spelling errors...I misplaced my glasses outside somewhere last night.  can barely see print.)

Edited by Distaff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You did 

 

Take what Shakaho said seriously. 

 

A water conditioner like Prime is a necessity in your case.  So are water changes.  Maybe double the dose of Prime over the weekends?  (Are there any vacations scheduled that will keep you out of the building for longer than two days?)

 

When you do the daily water changes, make sure the tap water is the same temp as the tank water.  I would probably fill buckets a day ahead every day to let the temps equalize.  I usually do a 50 percent change daily for a new quarantine fish, but I've never worked with just twenty gallons before...check the guidelines for care on this forum.

 

Get a cover (secure it if possible) for the tank so people don't do random stupid things like try to feed the fish.  Also, err on the side of under feeding.

 

Are you going to make a pet of the fish when the project is over?

 

(Please overlook typos/spelling errors...I misplaced my glasses outside somewhere last night.  can barely see print.)

You did very well without your glasses.  :thumbup2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually do a 50 percent change daily for a new quarantine fish, but I've never worked with just twenty gallons before...

I have experience here. I kept my three commons in a 20 gallon for 3.5 months, and part of that was the cycling process. I tested every day during cycling and I have records of how often the ammonia built up enough to require a water change, if it will help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually do a 50 percent change daily for a new quarantine fish, but I've never worked with just twenty gallons before...

I have experience here. I kept my three commons in a 20 gallon for 3.5 months, and part of that was the cycling process. I tested every day during cycling and I have records of how often the ammonia built up enough to require a water change, if it will help.
in this instance, I do not think it will help unfortunately as this is a different fish, less fish, and less food being fed. Also it is most likely a different size than the fish you had, so your results can be quite drastically different from what Pixo will experience when cycling. Edited by Mikey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It will give useful information for all of us about what to expect,  particularly when running a hospital/quarantine tank.   

 

It will not substitute for testing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow interesting assignment. Could be much harder than it sounds or fairly simply. Depends on how healthy and how big of a fish you get! It will be a true struggle with a larger fish, a fancy fish, or a fish that comes to you sick, as so often happens with let store fish. I would not want to be treating for illness while cycling! I didn't read every word of every post so I thought I would mention it would be of great help to your project if you can get a bag of cycled media from a friend or something to put in the filter at the beginning of the project, so that you have a significant head start on the cycling process. A small common or comet goldfish shouldn't have too much trouble living through the cycling process at that point, if it is not ill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wondering what you are going to do with him once the project is over? Hope he will become your pet!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They did this in my sister's class and the other students pretty much flushed them when they finished. Hence why teacher's mandating students to play with lives makes me mad. But, you get a new pet from it and i am eager to see it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now