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KimA.

Pothos Plants

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Hello!

 

 

I purchased six Pothos plants and dropped the roots into the tank.  Some of  the leaves hit below the water line.

 

Is there any issue with the fish  nibbling  on leaves?  I read it's not healthy  for dogs and cats.

 

 

Thanks!   :thumbup2:

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The oxalates in the leaves might be problematic for the fish, but I'm not too sure.

Frankly, I'd remove any leaves that are below the waterline. It's not an aquatic species--even if they don't cause a problem for the fish, they'll just rot.

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Pothos leaves contain oxalic acid, which, in high concentration, has the toxic effect of making the mouth burn.  This protects the plant by making sure that any critter that tries to eat it spits it out and doesn't come back for more.  Goldfish have a good sense of taste and don't come back for more of something nasty.

 

How much nitrate they remove depends on how fast they grow.  The plants grow best with only the roots in the water. 

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I try to keep my potos leaves out, because the residue makes the leaves look ugly. 

 

FWIW, I figure it is safe as potos is a staple in amphibian vivariums.  As a general rule of thumb, if tiny dart frogs and salamanders are fine with it (they are VERY sensitive to toxin absorption thru the skin), then the plant is probably OK for everyone else. 

 

I haven't seen it on any death lists - not like dieffembachia, yew, or rhodendron.

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This is interesting.  I've got a pothos plant in my outdoor pond filter.  There are probably 15 vines/limbs growing out of it, and 3 of them grew into the water.  They are probably about 2 feet long, with tons of roots at least a foot long.  The ones growing under water are actually growing much faster than the ones that are out of water.

 

I'll leave mine in for now, but if they end up rotting, I'll just cut those off.  The main plant has PLENTY of roots in the filter.... The roots are actually quite invasive and get into every nook and cranny, making filter maintenance a challenge. 

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This is interesting.  I've got a pothos plant in my outdoor pond filter.  There are probably 15 vines/limbs growing out of it, and 3 of them grew into the water.  They are probably about 2 feet long, with tons of roots at least a foot long.  The ones growing under water are actually growing much faster than the ones that are out of water.

 

I'll leave mine in for now, but if they end up rotting, I'll just cut those off.  The main plant has PLENTY of roots in the filter.... The roots are actually quite invasive and get into every nook and cranny, making filter maintenance a challenge.

A lot of terrestrials will do that, only to start rotting a few months later. Bamboo is notorious for it.

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Thank you all for your responses.   I hope it will help with the nitrate problem.

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This is interesting.  I've got a pothos plant in my outdoor pond filter.  There are probably 15 vines/limbs growing out of it, and 3 of them grew into the water.  They are probably about 2 feet long, with tons of roots at least a foot long.  The ones growing under water are actually growing much faster than the ones that are out of water.

 

I'll leave mine in for now, but if they end up rotting, I'll just cut those off.  The main plant has PLENTY of roots in the filter.... The roots are actually quite invasive and get into every nook and cranny, making filter maintenance a challenge.

A lot of terrestrials will do that, only to start rotting a few months later. Bamboo is notorious for it.

 

That explains a lot! :thanks: I had a pothos grow remarkably well in my 10 gallon betta tank. Filled up the majority with roots and got pretty big rather quickly. Then I noticed a few leaves wilting and started weeding them out. Soon there was nothing healthy left. Gave up on terrestrials since then. (there is still bamboo in there though) Been itching to start something in the goldie tanks, but  :scared

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That explains a lot! :thanks: I had a pothos grow remarkably well in my 10 gallon betta tank. Filled up the majority with roots and got pretty big rather quickly. Then I noticed a few leaves wilting and started weeding them out. Soon there was nothing healthy left. Gave up on terrestrials since then. (there is still bamboo in there though) Been itching to start something in the goldie tanks, but  :scared

Were the leaves underwater? That's really only when they'll start to rot.

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That explains a lot! :thanks: I had a pothos grow remarkably well in my 10 gallon betta tank. Filled up the majority with roots and got pretty big rather quickly. Then I noticed a few leaves wilting and started weeding them out. Soon there was nothing healthy left. Gave up on terrestrials since then. (there is still bamboo in there though) Been itching to start something in the goldie tanks, but  :scared

Were the leaves underwater? That's really only when they'll start to rot.

 

I want to say no, but I can't remember. It's possible some were.

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That explains a lot! :thanks: I had a pothos grow remarkably well in my 10 gallon betta tank. Filled up the majority with roots and got pretty big rather quickly. Then I noticed a few leaves wilting and started weeding them out. Soon there was nothing healthy left. Gave up on terrestrials since then. (there is still bamboo in there though) Been itching to start something in the goldie tanks, but  :scared

Were the leaves underwater? That's really only when they'll start to rot.

I want to say no, but I can't remember. It's possible some were.

Probably not what killed it then. Having wet feet is usually okay, but when you get leaves submerged, those parts of the plant can rot if not removed.

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