Jump to content
Kokos Goldfish Forum

Recommended Posts

Tap water does not always stay the same, so check it regularly.  Ask the water company about the ammonia in your tap water.  It should not be there.

 

I suspected you would find ammonia in the tap water, since the fish couldn't produce ammonia fast enough to get from zero to 2 ppm nitrite in 5 hours.  Ammonia oxidizers will convert 0.5 ppm ammonia (from the tap) to 1.4 ppm nitrite almost instantly.  (one ammonia produces one nitrite, but nitrite is almost 3 times as heavy as ammonia) So if you had 2 ppm nitrite 5 hours after a water change, 1.4ppm came from the ammonia in your tap water and 0.6 came from the ammonia produced by your fish.  Over 24 hours, your fish should produce 2.9 ppm giving you 4.3 ppm nitrite before the daily water change.

 

This puts you between a rock and a hard place.  Changing all the water takes away all of the nitrite, but the new water brings ammonia, which your filter rapidly changes to nitrite. Possible solutions include:

 

Find a source of water that doesn't contain ammonia.  If you used half ammonia free water and half tap water in your water changes, you could reduce the nitrite spike.  

 

Find something that removes ammonia from the tap water.  Check with your hardware/home improvement store to see if they have any filters that remove ammonia.

 

Use an ammonia binder in a filter to pretreat your tap water before water changes.  I am unfamiliar with these, but will ask the mod team about any they recommend.  

 

Just tough it out.  The nitrite spike slows cycling, but eventually it will happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tap water does not always stay the same, so check it regularly.  Ask the water company about the ammonia in your tap water.  It should not be there.

 

I suspected you would find ammonia in the tap water, since the fish couldn't produce ammonia fast enough to get from zero to 2 ppm nitrite in 5 hours.  Ammonia oxidizers will convert 0.5 ppm ammonia (from the tap) to 1.4 ppm nitrite almost instantly.  (one ammonia produces one nitrite, but nitrite is almost 3 times as heavy as ammonia) So if you had 2 ppm nitrite 5 hours after a water change, 1.4ppm came from the ammonia in your tap water and 0.6 came from the ammonia produced by your fish.  Over 24 hours, your fish should produce 2.9 ppm giving you 4.3 ppm nitrite before the daily water change.

 

This puts you between a rock and a hard place.  Changing all the water takes away all of the nitrite, but the new water brings ammonia, which your filter rapidly changes to nitrite. Possible solutions include:

 

Find a source of water that doesn't contain ammonia.  If you used half ammonia free water and half tap water in your water changes, you could reduce the nitrite spike.  

 

Find something that removes ammonia from the tap water.  Check with your hardware/home improvement store to see if they have any filters that remove ammonia.

 

Use an ammonia binder in a filter to pretreat your tap water before water changes.  I am unfamiliar with these, but will ask the mod team about any they recommend.  

 

Just tough it out.  The nitrite spike slows cycling, but eventually it will happen.

Thanks so much Shakaho, I will see what I can find out about the tap water and some type of filtration for it... I'm hoping that the newly scrubbed filter housing will make a big difference... As well as the additional filter... But I will keep on it... I will keep posting numbers to share progress... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris here... Pre water change numbers: PH= 8.2, Ammonia 0 - .25, Nitrite = 2.0-5.0, Nitrate = 10

2 hrs Post water change numbers: PH=8.0, Ammonia = .25, Nitrite = .50, Nitrate = 5.0

I will check again late afternoon....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris here... Pre water change numbers: PH= 8.2, Ammonia 0 - .25, Nitrite = 2.0-5.0, Nitrate = 10

2 hrs Post water change numbers: PH=8.0, Ammonia = .25, Nitrite = .50, Nitrate = 5.0

I will check again late afternoon....

P.S. 98% water change... ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Test your tap water again.  Pay attention of the nitrate test.  You sometimes get funny readings with that test.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Test your tap water again.  Pay attention of the nitrate test.  You sometimes get funny readings with that test.

Chris here...

1:40pm tap water test... PH=8.2, Ammonia = .50 Nitrite = 0, Nitrate = 0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Test your tap water again.  Pay attention of the nitrate test.  You sometimes get funny readings with that test.

Chris here... Post water change numbers 6/25. 4pm... PH = 8.0, Ammonia = 0 - .25, Nitrite = 2.0, Nitrate = 5.0.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Post WC and your nitrite is 2?  How much did you change?  :idont

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Post WC and your nitrite is 2? How much did you change? :idont

Hi Fantailfan, I changed 98% of the water... There was less than 1/4 inch of water in the tank and what was in both filters... I did not dump the filters... The 4pm test was 6 1/2 hrs after the water change... The 2 hr post showed Nitrite at .50.....

The battle continues... :(

Edited by Chris1251

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this was me I would slow it way down with the water changes. Am I wrong? Nonsense adding all that ammonia to the tank.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this was me I would slow it way down with the water changes. Am I wrong? Nonsense adding all that ammonia to the tank.

Hi DieselPower... This is the first time ever that the tap showed .50 of ammonia... All the other times I have tested tap water it ha been less than .25 just not zero... I think the heat is becoming an issue... :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But the nitrite being so high so fast slows the process . . . The Prime neutralizes the ammonia and at some point, hopefully soon, the BBs will be able to handle the nitrite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But the nitrite being so high so fast slows the process . . . The Prime neutralizes the ammonia and at some point, hopefully soon, the BBs will be able to handle the nitrite.

Hi Fantailfan, from your keyboard to the BB Gods... I have been so lucky that my Chus have been healthy so far... I just hope that they stay that way long beyond the after the BB's get to where they need to be...

Edited by Chris1251

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason the nitrite is so high is because as Shakaho mentioned, the bacteria convert the tap ammonia almost instantly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason the nitrite is so high is because as Shakaho mentioned, the bacteria convert the tap ammonia almost instantly.

I'm hoping that the additional filter will help with this issue... How do I balance the two without hurting my fish??? Do I buy purified water??? Is there something that I can add to the filter??? I can not start to research the city water until the work week begins... And doing that will also takes time... As Shakaho said... Rock and hard place... :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 I did not dump the filters...

 

Why change "98%" of the water in the tank and then keep the dirtiest water in the system -- that collected in the filters?

 

It looks like the nitrite  has started declining.  With Prime to protect against ammonia and salt to protect them from nitrite, your fish will not suffer. You have nitrate production, so you have a population of NOBs, (nitrite oxidizing bacteria),  just not a large enough population.  

 

You could get a 20 gallon storage box,  a small filter, and some zeolite (an ammonia binder).   Then fill the box with tap water, use the zeolite as filter medium,  and filter the water until the ammonia reads zero.  Then you have purified water for a water change.

 

Once cycling has completed, the ammonia in your tap water causes no problems at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did not dump the filters...

Why change "98%" of the water in the tank and then keep the dirtiest water in the system -- that collected in the filters?

It looks like the nitrite has started declining. With Prime to protect against ammonia and salt to protect them from nitrite, your fish will not suffer. You have nitrate production, so you have a population of NOBs, (nitrite oxidizing bacteria), just not a large enough population.

You could get a 20 gallon storage box, a small filter, and some zeolite (an ammonia binder). Then fill the box with tap water, use the zeolite as filter medium, and filter the water until the ammonia reads zero. Then you have purified water for a water change.

Once cycling has completed, the ammonia in your tap water causes no problems at all.

Good morning Shakaho, Thank you for the suggestion... I will look where I can get the zeolite as as soon as I test the tap water this morning... I don't have an extra filter I'm assuming that the filter is for filtering out the zeolite and Ammonia... (I do have an extra air stone) So I will see what I can find at the local Petsmart, Petco, or Walmart... More to follow.... :) Edited by Chris1251

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found Amazon has great prices on filters compared to retail stored however there is that wait on shipping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cheapest, smallest filter will do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cheapest, smallest filter will do.

Shakaho, would Purigen work??? I do have 250ml of it??? I have ordered the zeolite, it will be here Wednesday...

Thanks, Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No.  Purigen only removes organic chemicals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No.  Purigen only removes organic chemicals.

Chris here... Thank you... Good to know... Here are today's numbers pre-water change:

Tap (am). PH =8.0, Ammonia = .25-.50, Nitrite = 0, Nitrate = 0

Tank: PH = 8.0, Ammonia = 0.25-.50, Nitrite = 5.0, Nitrate = 5.0-10

How water do you suggest for a water change???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shakaho, Chris here... I ment to say how much water do recommend to change???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason the nitrite is so high is because as Shakaho mentioned, the bacteria convert the tap ammonia almost instantly.

I get that but it only accounts for 1.4 ppm of the 5 she's getting. And at 5 ppm, that inhibits the BBs which we don't want to happen.

The zeolite idea is a great one especially since she will only need to do that temporarily until her cycle can handle the tap ammonia . . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about changing 75% in the morning.  Read and report parameters before the change and right after the change.  I want to find out how much nitrite you actually have in the water, since 5 ppm  tops the chart, so it could be 5ppm or it could be more.

 

Then do a 50% change in the evening to try to get the nitrite spike lower.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...