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Shahbazin

Help! What to do about tank overflow?

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Talk to me about tank overflows - I just dumped between 30-50 gallons of water on my carpet against the back wall of the room our 75 gal. tank is in while refilling the tank with a Python, got distracted for a few minutes near end of water fill. As much as could be was blotted up, the tank has been drained & pulled back from the wall, the fish & plants have been moved outside to their old tub (with powerhead still running sponge filter, AC media just dumped in water). Pull up the rug, new padding, remove baseboard, rip out drywall? Or what? Did anyone have a flood company out to deal with this, does homeowner's insurance usually cover this sort of thing? I'm in California.

 

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Insurance dealt with it when my tank exploded...had people come out and rip up the carpet and set up big dryers to get everything out and then they replaced the carpet. It was a 50 gallon tank and it had soaked the whole room. 

 

But I imagine it would be different depending on the insurance companies, location and what you're covered for. 

Edited by FishyMandy

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Oh, no! Sorry this happened! I've spilled only about 5 gallons when I left a bucket with a hose to fill and forgot for a moment - never did that again! Insurance may cover it, you'll have to ring them and see.

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It might have been only 5 gallons - but we definitely mopped up a bit with towels. We're still concerned about the drywall wicking water, & mold. 

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When we had a pipe break in the den, my dad had to smash out some of the drywall and replace it. Lol wasn't professional but luckily it did the trick and we didn't get any awful mold. The floor was hardwood at the time so not much harm was done to the floor. I had a minor leak in my room from the roof. The leak was patched and the spot had a high velocity fan in front of a heater blowing up towards it, where the warmer air was blasted towards the damp spot (my room was so warm!) and it quickly dried and no mold.

Edited by mjfromga

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I think you would have had to be gone for more than a few minutes to end up spilling 30+ gallons of water. You'd definitely notice it too, that's a lot of water -- more than a few towels worth certainly.

Edited by dan in aus

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I would definitely have the carpet pulled back to encourage drying.  You may also need to have the pad replaced to prevent trapping moisture and mold growth.

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OK.  A little more information, please.  What kind of floor do you have under the carpet?  If a wood floor, can you examine it from a basement or crawl space to see if the wood is wet?  If you could mop up most of the water with towels, you didn't spill much.  It takes a lot of towels to mop up 5 gallons of water.  (I wonder how I know that.)  You might be able to get some more moisture out of the carpet with a wet-dry shop vac.

 

It's dry season and air conditioning season.  Right?  So you have dry air in the house.  Set up a fan blowing over the wet area and turn down the temperature.  People "steam" clean carpets with water all the time and these dry out.  Unless there was inches of water above the top of the carpet, you probably have no problem with the drywall. 

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When my 30 gallon tank sprung a leak, leaked about 10 gallons on the floor. We had to pull everything away and blow fans on it. Took a good week to dry.

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It takes a lot of towels to mop up 5 gallons of water. (I wonder how I know that.) .

:tomuch:

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Oh, I'm so sorry this happened! What a what a pain to say the least... :madrant

Definitely check out your insurance and Shakaho seems to know alot about this... :teehee

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How long was it overflowing. I have overflowed a bit at least 3 times and I dried what I could with towels and was done with it. Doesn't seem to be an issue.

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I guess the main thing is that it dries out completely so mild doesn't develope

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You can rent an industrial dehumidifier.

We had a leak in our basement from the outside spigot (conveniently ruptured inside the house). Carpet and pad nearly 100% soaked on a concrete slab. Had to have 3 of them and 4 huge fans and it still took a week and a half to dry it out. That was horrible. Really makes me want to move my tanks to the garage but not yet...

If you think it's really wet but not insurance claimable really think about getting a dehumidifier to help dry it out.

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Thanks for all of the suggestions! :)  I am writing from a different computer in another room, as there are currently 2 big industrial fans blowing near my computer (very noisily). We ended up having Bill Howe Plumbing come in & pull back a bit of the carpet & pad, exposing the cement slab floor underneath, & dabbing a bit of anti fungal/mold stuff on the slab, as well as setting up & renting out the fans. There was an area about 20 inches by 20 inches that was actually damp down to the cement, where the water ran out over the last 6 inches or so of the right side of back of the tank & hit the floor with a waterfall effect & a teensy strip right along the wall for 6 or 8 feet, but not going into the drywall or trim, thank goodness.  On one hand, I guess it was good the water wasn't spread out along the whole back of the tank, on the other hand, I'm going to make sure it's completely level & put some shims under the stand when I put it back up. Our slab slopes a bit south & west, & the tank is against the south eastern corner. It's super dry here, & already I don't see/feel any moisture, but the fans will run until Monday morning when they pick them up. Shakaho, we did use a LOT of towels :) I think we literally caught it about 2 minutes after it overflowed, & we had towels on it within minutes. Water tends to sort of bead up on our carpet for a minute, too. The aquarium stand has a solid floor, & there was water inside that I blotted out & most of the stuff inside was in plastic containers, & I don't think anything was ruined; all manuals were in a gallon ziplock. When we turned the stand over, there was no water under it, the wood was perfectly dry. I stripped the tank down to a couple of pounds of sand & maybe an inch of water - the rest of the wet sand filling a 5 gal. pail.

 

Do I need to rinse the sand or anything before returning it to the tank? Or do anything about the wet sand & inch of water remaining in the tank, & will this affect the tank integrity in any way? I intend to start setting up the tank Monday after the fans get picked up & carpet put back, & return the fish by Mon. eve. or Tuesday morning. I have the plants & fish in a 100 gal. stock tank outside the back door, with just the hydro pro5 sponge with the powerhead on it running; I dumped all the Aquaclear media on the bottom of the tub next to it - will the bacteria mostly survive, or will I see a cycle bump, do you all think? I have some wire & shade cloth over to fish to keep them from getting too hot & only fed them once today - they were mostly chasing each other around anyhow, seemed not too upset by the sudden change - I think all of the plants help them feel more secure. Current house temp is 75 F without running the AC.

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I don;t have carpet. We just clean it up and try not to do it again.  Maybe get a shop vac and suck up the water.  Or have carpet cleaners come do it. Then put something on the carpet that can handle spills.   Or remove the carpet but a nice edge on it and put tiles down where the tank goes?

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