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fishy

Does size or number matter when stocking?

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I was wondering what matters most when stocking, size or number of fish. In general I know the stocking parameters follow 15-20 gallons per fish. I have 4 Goldie's (2 telescopes @ 3 inches each, 1 oranda @ 4 inches and 1 oranda @ 2.5 inches-all measurements are without tail length). The 2 teles & small oranda have been in a 40 breeder since November, no problems. The small oranda is 1 year of age, I've had 1 tele x 1 year and has grown maybe 1/4 inch- same as the other tele but I've had him x 2 years, I've had the other oranda 2 years and I'm pretty sure he was mature when I got him-he hasn't changed much at all. I actually don't know if they are boys or girls. My ideal goal is a 75 gallon, right now I have a spare 55. Any thoughts are appreciated.

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I'd go with number of fish, since the fish will, eventually, become much larger. If people get little ones that fit "for now", they risk all sorts of water quality & disease problems when the increased bioload creeps up on them, if they're not prepared to upgrade. You can certainly go with smaller tanks when growing them out, but you do need to pay close attention to the water parameters, & be ready to switch them or increase water changes just as soon as required. Since you've got the spare tank, I wouldn't worry, since you can just run a pair in each tank if needed, if you don't have a 75 ready to go when they get the point where they need more space.

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Thanks for the info, I didn't quite think 4 in a 55 would be ideal but thought I'd double check :)

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The amount of food that goes in the tank, since all waste products originate from food.   That compares well to the total mass of the fish.  We say provide 20 gallons per  fish because most adult goldfish will do well  20 gallons of water apiece.  If you have super-jumbo goldfish, you may have to think about 30 gallons per fish.

 

I want to call for the Koko stick when someone tells a new member who has two inch-long (sl) comets in a ten gallon tank, that he is overstocked and has to do huge water changes and get a 40B at the next $ per gallon sale.  It takes a lot of little fish to equal one adult.  Fish have three dimensions so a fish that with twice the length (sl) as another fish of the same variety also has twice the height and twice the width, and thus 2= 8 times the volume/mass.  

 

Now, of course, we have very good reason to recommend people get a tank big enough to hold 3 adult fish for their 3 little babies.  It saves a lot of money to buy one tank for them rather than getting a series of larger tanks.  Also fish grow faster and larger when they have lots of water when they are little.  Some people feed their small fish lots of highly nutritious food to maximize their adult size.  Go back and read my first sentence in this post.  If you feed a small fish as much as a big fish, it needs the same amount of water to dilute the waste as does the big fish.

 

Looking at the sizes of your fish, I say they should have 20 gallons each.  These average out as adult-sized goldfish.  

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