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GoldnTexas

Start cycle over?

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Hey yall! So I started my cycle a couple days ago, yesterday my bubble wand broke into a few pieces and started floating around, so I took it out and fixed it. The same day, my filters started overflowing ( I think the sand clogged the mechanical media, which i didnt have in correctly I've discovered), and I think I had overstuffed the filter with ceramic so i took a little bit out, it cured my overflow problem. My dilemma is since the cycle was less than 24 hours in and I disturbed everything, should I drain and start over? Or should I just leave it and check for nitrites in a week (adding a day for when I fixed the overflow problem)? I would hate to waste more time. Any suggestions or anybody have an experience similar while cycling? I tested the water and it is still at 4ppm ammonia.

 

 

Thanks in advance for the help!

 

 

Chris

Edited by GoldnTexas

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Wait until someone else chimes in, but I don't see any reason to change the water. You have what you need in there. 

 

You might want to check your ammonia daily though, and add it back as necessary.

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and i will add that it's been a while for me, so I forget if ammonia just goes away by itself before nitrites start showing up in tests. :teehee

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Wait until someone else chimes in, but I don't see any reason to change the water. You have what you need in there. 

 

You might want to check your ammonia daily though, and add it back as necessary.

:bingo:

 

The ammonia will start to show nitrites soon.... you dont need to change water till those nitrites get to 2-3 ppm then you need to get it down to 1ppm..... Time is your friend....

 

Sometimes adding live plants will kick it into action too... :)

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To help speed up the cycle, do a 50% water change to get the ammonia down to 2 ppm.  The outdated recommendations for 4 ppm ammonia for fishless cycling slow down the cycling process since excess ammonia inhibits both ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation. 

 

If you got sand in your mechanical medium, you should clean the impeller and get the filter uptake farther from the substrate. 

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To help speed up the cycle, do a 50% water change to get the ammonia down to 2 ppm.  The outdated recommendations for 4 ppm ammonia for fishless cycling slow down the cycling process since excess ammonia inhibits both ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation. 

 

If you got sand in your mechanical medium, you should clean the impeller and get the filter uptake farther from the substrate. 

 

Thank you Sharon :)

 

The other thing you can do to the intake is put a sponge on the end of it, this will keep the sand out too :)

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Ok cool. I will do that today then. I tested the water on my betta tank and it has 10ppm nitrates, could I seed my filter with some of the gravel from that tank to speed it up as well?

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If you have ceramic media in your betta tank, I would move some of that.  If not, you could move some gravel.  I'd put it in a mesh bag and toss it in the filter . . . .

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Cool I put some gravel in a media bag in the filter. I will do a 50% water change tonight after supper and test for 2ppm ammonia

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Did the 50% water change and tested for ammonia after about 45 minutes, reading 2ppm. Now I will let it go for a few days and retest. Hopefully I see some changes :)

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thank you all for the help

Edited by GoldnTexas

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Good luck and keep us posted. :)

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Tidying up here: moving thread to water forum.

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To help speed up the cycle, do a 50% water change to get the ammonia down to 2 ppm.  The outdated recommendations for 4 ppm ammonia for fishless cycling slow down the cycling process since excess ammonia inhibits both ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation. 

 

If you got sand in your mechanical medium, you should clean the impeller and get the filter uptake farther from the substrate. 

Ahhh you finally agree with my post from quite a while back that high ammonia stalls a cycle!  :) 

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When did you post that, DP?  I've been saying it for years and begging people to stop adding ammonia when it drops to zero. 

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Good Morning Ya'll! I have some good news to share this morning. So I tested my perimeters today around 9:00am and I am happy to report that my ammonia is down to 1ppm, with a reading of 0.25 nitrite! It's working!  :rockon

 

I'm guessing I just leave it be and don't add any new ammonia?

 

 

:goldfish:  :goldfish:    soon!

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Yes, just leave it.  If the nitrite goes up to 2 ppm, report your parameters.  You will want to do a water change, but I can't predict how large without the parameters.

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Yes, just leave it.  If the nitrite goes up to 2 ppm, report your parameters.  You will want to do a water change, but I can't predict how large without the parameters.

Is the ammonia ok at 1ppm?

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Yes, just leave it.  If the nitrite goes up to 2 ppm, report your parameters.  You will want to do a water change, but I can't predict how large without the parameters.

Is the ammonia ok at 1ppm?

 

:thumbup2:

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Yes.  1 ppm excess ammonia does inhibit the nitrification processes slightly,  but nothing like 4 ppm.  Any measurable ammonia is more than the current population of ammonia oxidizers can use, since if they could use it, they would.  The AOB/AOA population should increase enough to clear the ammonia in 3 or 4 days. 

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Since you added some gravel from a cycled tank, the population of NOBs (nitrite oxidizing bacteria) should build up faster than usual.  These bugs can be prima donnas though, so I can't predict when the nitrate appears.  Just keep testing.

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very well. I will just leave it be and keep testing every morning or two and report back any changes. thank you all so much for your help! it's been rough since the wife wants to get her fish so bad already lol

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Congratulations on getting to the nitrite stage!!

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