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wteoh1

6.6 pH, goldfish getting inactive

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Hi guys. I did let you guys know about my move from Naperville, Illinois to Durham, North Carolina. Unknown to my behalf that I was very surprised about what I discovered today.

 

I did realize since the move, my Goldfish have been getting inactive and resting alot on the bottom but still eating especially since my Goldfish were in perfect health since I had them for 4 years from Illinois. 

 

When we had a plumber come in to do an estimate since were getting a whole house filter installed, he did inform us that the pH tap water around our neighborhood was 6.6 (however, the cities water annual report stated 7.8). I did a water pH test in my aquarium (API Master Test Kit) and shockingly enough it was around 6.6-6.8. I blame the acidic water entirely for causing my goldfish to been lazy. Before I moved, my tap water in Illinois was 8.1 which was perfect for the Goldfish.

 

I really need help on this. I did own a pH buffer from API and because of the chemical health risks it posed to my previous fish that I promised to never used it again. Now I the biggest help for the safest way to help raise my pH safely without chemicals and I need advice ASAP. My goldfish isn't doing well and I want the to live. What kind of products would you recommend for my fish?

 

Please feel free to reply and PM me or by phone (ask me from PM for phone#).

Edited by wteoh1

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Hope they feel better soon.

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Just use baking soda.   Fill a bucket with water, measure the pH, add a small measured amount of baking soda like 1/4 teaspoon.  Measure the pH again.  Repeat until you get the pH you want, making sure you record how much you added.  Don't try to raise the pH to 8.1.  Try for ~ 7.5.

 

If the pH goes from 7.8 at the water company to 6.8 at your house, the KH is probably very low.  Measure this. 

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I use small amounts of baking soda to slowly raise PH. my Rhonda suffered from an accidental PH crash as I forgot to add the buffer (our tap PH is in the low 6 range) and he SANK LIKE a rock and also spit out his food. As the PH went up, so did he! He's perfectly fine now. Eating and swimming normally. It badly shocked him. I've NEVER had an issue with the baking soda negatively affecting my fish. I'm just sure to add a little at a time so as not to raise it too quickly. Hope your guys get to feeling better!

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Just use baking soda.   Fill a bucket with water, measure the pH, add a small measured amount of baking soda like 1/4 teaspoon.  Measure the pH again.  Repeat until you get the pH you want, making sure you record how much you added.  Don't try to raise the pH to 8.1.  Try for ~ 7.5.

 

If the pH goes from 7.8 at the water company to 6.8 at your house, the KH is probably very low.  Measure this. 

Baking soda won't harm goldfish, FYI I forgot to add I have a 60 Gallon

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I use small amounts of baking soda to slowly raise PH. my Rhonda suffered from an accidental PH crash as I forgot to add the buffer (our tap PH is in the low 6 range) and he SANK LIKE a rock and also spit out his food. As the PH went up, so did he! He's perfectly fine now. Eating and swimming normally. It badly shocked him. I've NEVER had an issue with the baking soda negatively affecting my fish. I'm just sure to add a little at a time so as not to raise it too quickly. Hope your guys get to feeling better!

thats exactly what happened to my fish but his eating.

 

What kind of baking soda should I use? Arm and Hammer? How much should I put for 60 gallons.

 

Also, should I put the baking soda in the tank while the fish are in the aquarium but won't they go into pH shock?

Edited by wteoh1

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Rhonda tried to eat, got a little down, but spit much of it back out. Also when my other fish chased him, he didn't have the energy to skirt away, which he usually does. He just wasn't feeling well. I raised the PH slowly and he got all better. It DID fall a tad several hours afterwards, but just a bit more baking soda and it held tight. Rhonda is eating like normal and running from Slate like normal and swimming around totally normally about a day after the incident. A moderator told me that significant drops can have huge effects, and its very true. Be sure to raise it slowly. Huge swings period aren't good for the fish. See if that helps. It sure helped me.

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Rhonda tried to eat, got a little down, but spit much of it back out. Also when my other fish chased him, he didn't have the energy to skirt away, which he usually does. He just wasn't feeling well. I raised the PH slowly and he got all better. It DID fall a tad several hours afterwards, but just a bit more baking soda and it held tight. Rhonda is eating like normal and running from Slate like normal and swimming around totally normally about a day after the incident. A moderator told me that significant drops can have huge effects, and its very true. Be sure to raise it slowly. Huge swings period aren't good for the fish. See if that helps. It sure helped me.

Do you remember how much baking soda you put in? Did you use arm and hammer brand?

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Follow Shakahos advice on adding the soda. Yes it is Arm & Hammer brand... But I doubt the brand matters.

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Just use baking soda.   Fill a bucket with water, measure the pH, add a small measured amount of baking soda like 1/4 teaspoon.  Measure the pH again.  Repeat until you get the pH you want, making sure you record how much you added.  Don't try to raise the pH to 8.1.  Try for ~ 7.5.

 

If the pH goes from 7.8 at the water company to 6.8 at your house, the KH is probably very low.  Measure this. 

How many gallons of the bucket of water should I fill? and do i just dump the water with the baking soda afterwards?

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Just use baking soda.   Fill a bucket with water, measure the pH, add a small measured amount of baking soda like 1/4 teaspoon.  Measure the pH again.  Repeat until you get the pH you want, making sure you record how much you added.  Don't try to raise the pH to 8.1.  Try for ~ 7.5.

 

If the pH goes from 7.8 at the water company to 6.8 at your house, the KH is probably very low.  Measure this.

Baking soda won't harm goldfish, FYI I forgot to add I have a 60 Gallon

It won't harm them. I have been using Baking soda for over a year now with excellent results. There is an article here on BS with very useful info and guides you how to measure it. Do you have a scale? Also a KH tester from API helps as well

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Good advice so far.  I'll repeat what Corrine just said--you'll want to test your KH along with your pH.

 

Have you tested your pH straight from the tap?

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Not yet still need to test tap

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Also guys, is it ok if I pour the baking soda in the aquarium while the fish are still in it? 

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I did it that way since Rhonda crashed. Worked perfectly fine for me. Just try not to get it ON the fish (don't thinks they'd like that too much, but probably wouldn't cause harm) and don't use a lot at once.

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I did it that way since Rhonda crashed. Worked perfectly fine for me. Just try not to get it ON the fish (don't thinks they'd like that too much, but probably wouldn't cause harm) and don't use a lot at once.

do you remember how many teaspoons at a time did you pour, since I don't want to pour all at once for 60 gal

Edited by wteoh1

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I was actually kinda nervous as I have snails in my tank and snails HATE sodium so I added tiny pinches at a time. You're better off adding small measured amounts like Shakaho instructed. I also have a much smaller tank than you do, so I'd need to add smaller amounts at a time than you probably would. As long as small amounts are added at a time, its fine. I don't think Rhonda would have fared too well if I just DUMPED it all in at once. I also would probably have raised it too high. To get to a certain PH, you have to be meticulous. I'm not an expert on this, I'm just saying what worked for me.

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Once you determine how much baking soda whether by the tables or experimenting in a bucket, you do not want to add that all at once.  Spread it out over several days to raise the pH gradually.  

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UPDATE: (1/302016) NEED HELP! CONFUSED

 

About the water test I did with the API pH kit that gave me a 6.6 reading. I left the glass tube with the reading since I forgot to put it away. 

 

-Today at 3pm when I came back from shopping I saw my reading at 7.2-7,6?!? How did the pH increase?

 

 

Good advice so far.  I'll repeat what Corrine just said--you'll want to test your KH along with your pH.

 

Have you tested your pH straight from the tap?

I tested the pH from the tap and I'm getting a 7.2-7.6 reading. What is causing my aquarium to become acidic 6.6??? Should I still put baking soda? Is it lacking GH or KH? is it the 3 driftwood in my aquarium??

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Driftwood can certainly cause the ph to drop. What I've done to avoid this is to boil the driftwood for many hours. You might trying taking out the driftwood for a while to see if this is the problem.

 

When using baking soda to buffer the ph, you'll also want to test kh. Kh for goldfish should be around 120-200 ppm.

Edited by LisaCGold

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I'd guess the KH is low.  Don't guess.  Get a KH test kit . . . .  :D

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Driftwood can certainly cause the ph to drop. What I've done to avoid this is to boil the driftwood for many hours. You might trying taking out the driftwood for a while to see if this is the problem.

 

When using baking soda to buffer the ph, you'll also want to test kh. Kh for goldfish should be around 120-200 ppm.

 

 

I'd guess the KH is low.  Don't guess.  Get a KH test kit . . . .   :D

I'd get in first thing tommorow. 

 

Added 2 teaspoons of baking soda already. Ph went up to around 7.6 but i gradually added baking soda hour after hour

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What reading do you get on the nitrate test?  High nitrate can lower pH.

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It seems there is some confusion over how to know how much baking soda to put into the 60 gllon tank. What I would do is get an approximately 2 gallon bucket and fill it with exactly one gallon of water. Then you will determine how much baking soda is needed to get 1 gallon to the desired level. Then, you will multiple that times 60 for the tank.

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