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cbtejero

tired of brown algae

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So my tank has been cycled since the end of August. Ever since then, I've had brown algae. I read that brown algae is common for newly cycled tanks and lasts for a while, but it's been over a month and I'm slowly getting tired of dealing with it  :no:

 

Water changes are every 2-3 days and I always scrub the walls of the tank and try to get as much off of the leaves of the Argentine Sword & Anubias I have in there. Also, I try to get as much algae off the inside of my filters when I clean them (every 2 weeks).

 

I try not to leave the lights on because the tank is already outside.

 

Is there anything more I need to do to control it?

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Fish love it.

Its also part of your biological. So be careful with the ocd cleaning of it. You may bump your cycle.

Or snails. But then they breed you get outbreaks of snails.

Uv sterilizers can assist. But thats also more money to buy keep running and to maintain (replacing uv bulb every 10-12months)

And they can be unsightly.

Try not to clean it so much for a bit and allow it to "ease" into a cycle. You may find it will lessen after a bit if you stop cleaning it so much (let it go inside the filter maybe)

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Diatoms tend to decrease as tanks mature, but maturation requires a lot more than just cycling.  Figure on at least a year.

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Do you have anything against green algae? After a coat of brown you can usually get a nice green coat going if you let it be. If you want you can try to add more plants, even bamboo shoots with just their roots in the water to compete for nutrients. :)

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I gave up with it. I have a smidge of BBA, diatoms, and now some green algae for once. I have a pleco in QT that I am wanting to put in there :rofl I'm leaving it alllll for him!

 

Another two weeks and he will be feasting like there is no tomorrow!

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thanks everyone!

it's just that I bought a new tank and moved everything in there. the tank glass is clearer and more satisfying to look at without algae on it!!

I'll just have to deal with algae on the plants and in the filter until it decreases.

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I had diatoms after cycling my tank that has only (PERHAPS...) stabilized in the last few weeks to a month. I found that adding plants that are *not* root feeders or rhizomes helped to control or at least halt the growth of the diatoms. They help eat the water column nutrients that diatoms like. And while I definitely do not recommend dumping in a ton of Excel into your tank to kill algae (you'll see this recommendation on the internet, and it seems like a very bad idea), perhaps adding a little CO2 to help the plants with nutrient uptake also made a big difference. Too much Excel at once, though, can cause plants to melt. So you'd have to taper up slightly. Now I only have some diatoms on the sides of my tank, and it has not been expanding. I leave it there since it's not bad for the water chemistry and my fish sometimes like to try to eat it. 

 

I'm not an plant expert or anything, but this has been my experience. What is your lighting like?

Edited by QandD

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Your tank is outside? That's your answer. If a tank is not balanced in every possible way, algae will be the result - especially under the sun!

 

If wish you luck. The sun is a strong lighting system!

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Your tank is outside? That's your answer. If a tank is not balanced in every possible way, algae will be the result - especially under the sun!

If wish you luck. The sun is a strong lighting system!

I meant outside but in the garage

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Your tank is outside? That's your answer. If a tank is not balanced in every possible way, algae will be the result - especially under the sun!

If wish you luck. The sun is a strong lighting system!

I meant outside but in the garage

 

 

You sure it doesn't have direct light on it? Or ever semi-direct light?

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I had diatoms after cycling my tank that has only (PERHAPS...) stabilized in the last few weeks to a month. I found that adding plants that are *not* root feeders or rhizomes helped to control or at least halt the growth of the diatoms. They help eat the water column nutrients that diatoms like. And while I definitely do not recommend dumping in a ton of Excel into your tank to kill algae (you'll see this recommendation on the internet, and it seems like a very bad idea), perhaps adding a little CO2 to help the plants with nutrient uptake also made a big difference. Too much Excel at once, though, can cause plants to melt. So you'd have to taper up slightly. Now I only have some diatoms on the sides of my tank, and it has not been expanding. I leave it there since it's not bad for the water chemistry and my fish sometimes like to try to eat it.

I'm not an plant expert or anything, but this has been my experience. What is your lighting like?

I have LED lights. I leave them off or on low brightness during the day

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Some people say that diatoms prefer low light and long photoperiods.  

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I recommend letting the natural blooms do their own thing as much as possible. I usually leave the back and one side. I read it is beneficial for the fish.

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I had continual problems with diatoms even after trying things such as shortening the photo period, etc.  I decided to get a female, albino Bristlenose Pleco for each of my tanks.  Once I quarantined them and added them to my Goldfish tanks, the algae was gone in about a week.  I have had them for over a year now and they are still keeping the glass, plants and wood quite clean.  They also get along fine with my Goldfish and add a second personality type to the tanks which I enjoy.  

 

If you decide to get a Pleco, here are some pointers:

 

1) Make sure it's a Bristlenose as they are smaller and more docile than common Plecos.  Females, as with most fish, are even more so.  Get a small one to start.

 

2) Be sure to provide it with a large, piece of wood such as Mopani which provides both nutrition and shelter.  It should have a hollow under it for them to hide in.  They need their own cave to retire to (and escape the pesky goldfish) during the daytime.

 

3) Offer them their own veggie food such as algae wafers, blanched zucchini, etc.  I do this at night, right before I turn off the lights.  Plecos are nocturnal and will have a better chance of getting the food in the dark.  Mine really like Zucchini rounds weighted down with a veggie clip.  These last them a whole day and the Goldfish can't just gobble them down in 5 minutes.

 

4) Keep the tank at about 75 F.  This is a fine compromise for both species.  

 

I have to say that my Plecos really made the hobby more enjoyable for me and I have never had a problem with aggression.  They just need the proper care as listed above :)

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I had continual problems with diatoms even after trying things such as shortening the photo period, etc.  I decided to get a female, albino Bristlenose Pleco for each of my tanks.  Once I quarantined them and added them to my Goldfish tanks, the algae was gone in about a week.  I have had them for over a year now and they are still keeping the glass, plants and wood quite clean.  They also get along fine with my Goldfish and add a second personality type to the tanks which I enjoy.  

 

If you decide to get a Pleco, here are some pointers:

 

1) Make sure it's a Bristlenose as they are smaller and more docile than common Plecos.  Females, as with most fish, are even more so.  Get a small one to start.

 

2) Be sure to provide it with a large, piece of wood such as Mopani which provides both nutrition and shelter.  It should have a hollow under it for them to hide in.  They need their own cave to retire to (and escape the pesky goldfish) during the daytime.

 

3) Offer them their own veggie food such as algae wafers, blanched zucchini, etc.  I do this at night, right before I turn off the lights.  Plecos are nocturnal and will have a better chance of getting the food in the dark.  Mine really like Zucchini rounds weighted down with a veggie clip.  These last them a whole day and the Goldfish can't just gobble them down in 5 minutes.

 

4) Keep the tank at about 75 F.  This is a fine compromise for both species.  

 

I have to say that my Plecos really made the hobby more enjoyable for me and I have never had a problem with aggression.  They just need the proper care as listed above :)

Is 72-73 degrees okay? That is where my tank usually is, or would you recommend I raise it to 75?

 

So excited to get this pleco out of QT :nana

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You should be able to tell by the Pleco's activity level.  If they are lethargic at 72-73, raise the temp to 75.

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i have  mamboos  and  my tank is  a little  bit  covered from algae   ,  fish eat it  plus  personally  i like  aquariums  with algae  , of curse   controled 

 

:hi

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You sure it doesn't have direct light on it? Or ever semi-direct light?

 

it does get some sun during sunrise, so about 2-3 hours? and that's all the light the tank gets during the day

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I had an aquarium in my house in front of a window that got no direct sunlight. Had all kinds of that brown junk. None of the other 5 aquariums I have had in non window front locations around my house have had that problem. I can't recall if you mentioned or anyone suggested shading it.

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