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Ree

Can i not use salt while dosing Prazi while cycling?

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Hi,

 

I am still trying to cycle my 220L tank.  So far its just little Louie in there, she is about 8-10g now I would guess.  pOdge (37g) will be joining her in about 1-2weeks is my guess.  Then Nudge (39g) and Smudge (16g) another 2-4weeks later.

 

The tank has had one double round of prazi with 0.1% salt, and then one single round of prazi with 0.1% salt. I have two more rounds of prazi to go.

 

I am doing 90% WC on the scheduled WC days for the 5 day rounds. 

 

I am using Blue Planet Fluke and Worm tablets.

 

So far I have not seen any trace of nitrites, but with the salt and frequent WC I am not surprised.

 

Is it possible to not use the salt for the last two rounds to encourage the cycling? 

 

or am I best off keeping the 0.1% salt until the prazi is finished?

 

 

 

 

 

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Salt has no effect on cycling that I know of.

 

Are you getting ammonia?  You have done two 5 day rounds of prazi, so you have been cycling for 10 days, right?

 

Do you have the tank full of water?

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Salt has no effect on cycling that I know of.

 

Are you getting ammonia?  You have done two 5 day rounds of prazi, so you have been cycling for 10 days, right?

 

Do you have the tank full of water?

 

Hi Sharon,

 

I did have ammonia up to 0.3ppm while pOdge was in there with Louie originally (that was for the first 17 days). Then I moved pOdge to QT due to his accident, so then Louie was in there for a further 13 days by herself before I started the Prazi.  Now I am only getting 0.1ppm after the four days.  So I have been cycling for 40 days all up now.

 

Also my water temp is down to 18 degrees now in the 220L tank.

 

Yes, I have the tank filled up to 180L just to make the prazi dose easy, and also it needs to be this high for my canister filter to operate at its best.... otherwise it sucks air in.  Ive checked all the pipes and reattached them, but it just seems to prefer the water to this level at least. 

Edited by Ree

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Sharon, would it be worth just doing the 90% WC after the prazi round ends, and not do the next one a day later when the prazi round starts?

 

Or even going further and reducing the WC to 40-50%?

 

I was doing 90% to eliminate as many of the eggs/parasites in the water as possible.

 

I have a suspicion I have been doing too big a WC thereby eliminating too much ammonia?

 

Oh and I haven't cleaned the filter yet as I didn't want to eliminate any bacteria. 

Edited by Ree

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It sounds to me like your tank is cycled -- at least for one fish.  If you have only one fish in a large tank (or pond) and do large (or even normal) water changes, you typically do not get readable amounts ammonia or nitrite.  Pond people normally cycle a new pond/filter by severely understocking then gradually increasing the number of fish.  

 

I would suggest you just do 50% water changes once a week.  

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It sounds to me like your tank is cycled -- at least for one fish.  If you have only one fish in a large tank (or pond) and do large (or even normal) water changes, you typically do not get readable amounts ammonia or nitrite.  Pond people normally cycle a new pond/filter by severely understocking then gradually increasing the number of fish.  

 

I would suggest you just do 50% water changes once a week.  

 

Thanks so much Sharon, Ill do as you say and limit the WC to 50% once a week. 

 

Should I been getting a nitrate reading though? or due to the large water changes, 90% twice a week, these wouldn't have shown up either?

Edited by Ree

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It sounds to me like your tank is cycled -- at least for one fish.  If you have only one fish in a large tank (or pond) and do large (or even normal) water changes, you typically do not get readable amounts ammonia or nitrite.  Pond people normally cycle a new pond/filter by severely understocking then gradually increasing the number of fish.  

 

I would suggest you just do 50% water changes once a week.  

 

Thanks so much Sharon, Ill do as you say and limit the WC to 50% once a week. 

 

Should I been getting a nitrate reading though? or due to the large water changes, 90% twice a week, these wouldn't have shown up either?

 

 

Not an expert, but when I was very understocked in a cycled tank, I did not get nitrate readings. I was changing the water every 5 days or so, however, and had a few plants, but not enough to make a huge difference. Louie's pretty little, right?

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So many people get messed up by the legend that a cycled tank has nitrates that I try to correct this as often as I can without creating a nasty argument.  True, a tank that has zero ammonia and nitrite along with a nitrate reading has to be cycled, but also true, a tank with fish, zero ammonia, zero nitrite, and zero nitrate that hasn't just had a very large water change, has cycled.  Also true, if you have a cycled aquarium with minimally acceptable fish load, filtration, and water change schedule,  no substrate, and no plants you will most likely have nitrates and can use the nitrates to determine how much and how often to change water.  

 

One time, on a pond forum, a newbie complained that her pond hadn't cycled after six months.  She had started the 200 gallon pond with ten feeder goldfish and had been checking her parameters from the start and had never had ammonia, nitrite, or nitrate, therefore her pond was not cycled.  No one could tell her otherwise, because even though this was her first pond, she had had aquariums for years and KNEW how cycling worked.  She wanted to add ammonia to her pond so that she could cycle it.  People did manage to convince her to take the fish out before she did this.  I don't know what her reaction was when the ammonia disappeared with no nitrite or nitrate appearing because I couldn't take any more and didn't return to that thread.

Edited by shakaho

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So many people get messed up by the legend that a cycled tank has nitrates that I try to correct this as often as I can without creating a nasty argument.  True, a tank that has zero ammonia and nitrite along with a nitrate reading has to be cycled, but also true, a tank with fish, zero ammonia, zero nitrite, and zero nitrate that hasn't just had a very large water change, has cycled.  Also true, if you have a cycled aquarium with minimally acceptable fish load, filtration, and water change schedule,  no substrate, and no plants you will most likely have nitrates and can use the nitrates to determine how much and how often to change water.  

 

One time, on a pond forum, a newbie complained that her pond hadn't cycled after six months.  She had started the 200 gallon pond with ten feeder goldfish and had been checking her parameters from the start and had never had ammonia, nitrite, or nitrate, therefore her pond was not cycled.  No one could tell her otherwise, because even though this was her first pond, she had had aquariums for years and KNEW how cycling worked.  She wanted to add ammonia to her pond so that she could cycle it.  People did manage to convince her to take the fish out before she did this.  I don't know what her reaction was when the ammonia disappeared with no nitrite or nitrate appearing because I couldn't take any more and didn't return to that thread.

 

Very true.....

 

I had a tank show readings like that before too, thought Oh no somethings wrong but nothing was, it was a 0.0.0 balance and sometimes your lucky and get that.. :)

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It sounds to me like your tank is cycled -- at least for one fish.  If you have only one fish in a large tank (or pond) and do large (or even normal) water changes, you typically do not get readable amounts ammonia or nitrite.  Pond people normally cycle a new pond/filter by severely understocking then gradually increasing the number of fish.  

 

I would suggest you just do 50% water changes once a week.  

 

Thanks so much Sharon, Ill do as you say and limit the WC to 50% once a week. 

 

Should I been getting a nitrate reading though? or due to the large water changes, 90% twice a week, these wouldn't have shown up either?

 

 

Not an expert, but when I was very understocked in a cycled tank, I did not get nitrate readings. I was changing the water every 5 days or so, however, and had a few plants, but not enough to make a huge difference. Louie's pretty little, right?

 

 

Hi QandD :hi Yep, she only little, less than 10g I would say at the moment.  And very cute with her little twitchy wiggle swim!

 

 

So many people get messed up by the legend that a cycled tank has nitrates that I try to correct this as often as I can without creating a nasty argument.  True, a tank that has zero ammonia and nitrite along with a nitrate reading has to be cycled, but also true, a tank with fish, zero ammonia, zero nitrite, and zero nitrate that hasn't just had a very large water change, has cycled.  Also true, if you have a cycled aquarium with minimally acceptable fish load, filtration, and water change schedule,  no substrate, and no plants you will most likely have nitrates and can use the nitrates to determine how much and how often to change water.  

 

One time, on a pond forum, a newbie complained that her pond hadn't cycled after six months.  She had started the 200 gallon pond with ten feeder goldfish and had been checking her parameters from the start and had never had ammonia, nitrite, or nitrate, therefore her pond was not cycled.  No one could tell her otherwise, because even though this was her first pond, she had had aquariums for years and KNEW how cycling worked.  She wanted to add ammonia to her pond so that she could cycle it.  People did manage to convince her to take the fish out before she did this.  I don't know what her reaction was when the ammonia disappeared with no nitrite or nitrate appearing because I couldn't take any more and didn't return to that thread.

 

Aaaaaaaaaaaah, that explains a lot!  :happydance Thankyou so much Sharon.  I will just keep an eye out on the parameters during the first week with 50% WC to make sure they are still under control.  Thankyou so very much!  I really had no idea nitrates were not an absolute certain part of the cycling process!  Thankyou!   :bighug

 

 

Very true.....

 

I had a tank show readings like that before too, thought Oh no somethings wrong but nothing was, it was a 0.0.0 balance and sometimes your lucky and get that.. :)

 

 

Thankyou for confirming that for me Koko... maybe Ill be one of the lucky ones then...  Ill have to wait and see what happens when I add my other babies and see if I still have no nitrates.  Interesting!  Thanks Koko! :Jig:

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So many people get messed up by the legend that a cycled tank has nitrates that I try to correct this as often as I can without creating a nasty argument.  True, a tank that has zero ammonia and nitrite along with a nitrate reading has to be cycled, but also true, a tank with fish, zero ammonia, zero nitrite, and zero nitrate that hasn't just had a very large water change, has cycled.  Also true, if you have a cycled aquarium with minimally acceptable fish load, filtration, and water change schedule,  no substrate, and no plants you will most likely have nitrates and can use the nitrates to determine how much and how often to change water.  

 

One time, on a pond forum, a newbie complained that her pond hadn't cycled after six months.  She had started the 200 gallon pond with ten feeder goldfish and had been checking her parameters from the start and had never had ammonia, nitrite, or nitrate, therefore her pond was not cycled.  No one could tell her otherwise, because even though this was her first pond, she had had aquariums for years and KNEW how cycling worked.  She wanted to add ammonia to her pond so that she could cycle it.  People did manage to convince her to take the fish out before she did this.  I don't know what her reaction was when the ammonia disappeared with no nitrite or nitrate appearing because I couldn't take any more and didn't return to that thread.

 

Sharon, the penny just dropped... the important thing is that the ammonia and nitrite are 0.  Why did I not see this before?????  :doh11:

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