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Frederickfirst

Fin Damage After Move

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Also are you testing your tap and tank pH BEFORE doing a WC?  I wonder if they were drifting because of a sudden change in pH.

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Okay I just tested the pH again for both tap and tank. And I tested pH before and after the water change. It's like my pH of my tank can't change. Ha!

As of a few minutes ago I got

TAP pH=8.8 or above (it turns the darkest purple after the first drop)

TANK pH=7.5 (the pH test was the color of 7.6 and the high pH test was a little lighter than 7.4).

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I also assumed they were drifting because of the change to but I can't get a different reading. This is so confusing. :)

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What are you using to test your pH?

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I reported this so I can get input from the other mods.  I'm not sure why the pH isn't going up.  :idont   Maybe we need to just keep adding more baking soda?  :idont

 

We'll get back to you.  :D

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Whats the KH and GH please

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Tank

kH=6 (107.4)

gh=8 (143.2)

Tap

kH=5 (89.5)

gH=7 (125.3)

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I'm not sure if these pictures will help. The first picture is the high range pH of my tap. The scecond picture is the pH of my tank and the third picture is the high range pH of my tank.

 

 

 

IMG_1053_zpsrjx2m3ud.jpg

 

IMG_1054_zpswitdzos4.jpg

 

IMG_1055_zpstgiojbv8.jpg

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Wait just a minute....when I did my water change before I added the baking soda I had dosed with Prazipro because of the fins.  Does Prazipro change the pH? 

Other than that nothing is different.

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Ok do me a favor....

 

I want you to test in the morning then at night all three...

 

PH, KH and GH

 

both tap and tank :)

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PraziPro won't affect your pH.  :D

 

And apparently either will baking soda.  :rofl3

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If you have municipal water, please check with the water company to see if your tap water parameters match theirs.  

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I can call the water company tomorrow. I'm sure I won't get an answer at 7 at night. Anyway, I just tested again and this is what I got.

 

Tap

pH= 8.8 or above

kH= 5 drops

gH= 7 drops

 

Tank

pH=7.4

kH= 6 drops

gH= 7 drops

 

So the only thing that changed was the gH of my tank went down one drop.

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Okay I just called the city and they told me the average pH is 9.5-9.6! And the kH is about 100 and the total hardness is from 100-108.

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Okay everyone, I went into different LFS around my area and ask about the water. I was told the water here has a ton of different things in it (ammonia and nitrite) that are NEVER constant. That being said they told me I shouldn't do my water changes with a hook up to the faucet. I should always let the water sit and dechlorinate for a minute of 20 minutes before it goes into the tank. Aka no dosing prime then adding right from the tap. He said he has had tons of people come in saying all their fish died right after a water change. The guy also told me that if you dechlorinate the tap water the pH goes down almost 2 full point. Hence why my pH is going from 9.5 to 7.4.

Does this make sense to anyone??

I tested his theory and tested the tap then put that water in a bucket and added prime. After 30 minutes the pH was 7.4. This is so crazy! And a touch annoying because now I have to have use buckets or a big tub (where the heck am I going to put these?). Oh boy.

Any thoughts on this would be lovely.

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This is not very difficult to handle, since the pH drop is very fast.  I can come up with several procedures that should work.  How big is your tank and what frequency and amount of water change do you aspire to?

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I haven't forgotten you.  I've been tied up all day and I'm exhausted now.  There are basically two approaches you can take.  One involves storing water for a big change once a week.  The other is to do smaller, more frequent water changes.  I have done calculations to determine equivalent changes (in terms of removing substances that collect, like nitrate) using various schedules.  

 

There are advantages and disadvantages to each approach.  The most important is what fits your schedule.  If weekdays are so hectic that 10-15 minutes for a small daily water change is something you may wind up skipping, you will want to do one or two larger changes a week.  On the other hand, if you want to do an 80% water change once a week, you have to pay a lot more attention to the quality of the water.  

 

The best storage containers can be found if you go to craigslist and search for plastic drums/plastic barrels.  You should get results like this.  

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I will elaborate on the previous post.  When you have tap water of questionable or variable quality, the best solution is a small daily water change.  I do 10% daily in my ponds.  Last summer, the city was supplying me with water that was toxic to fish while claiming the cloudy water was harmless.  It was only after the state tested the water and found it unacceptable that they confessed.  It was around the same time that I realized that all of the fish I lost had experienced a large or total water change.  This included all of the fry that I wanted to keep (the ones I dumped in the duckweed tub and neglected were fine), a few older fish that I moved to a hospital tank for minor problems, and a few that I moved from a pond I was cleaning.

 

Since your tap water changes pH rapidly, letting it sit in buckets overnight or for a few hours should make small water changes safe.  Two five gallon buckets allow for a 25% water change.

 

Here are some water change schedules that result in approximately the same average level of accumulating solutes (such as nitrate) in your tank.

 

80% once a week.  

 

50% twice a week

 

25% every other day.

 

10% six days a week and 50% on the seventh day.

 

If you are changing more than 25% on any day, I recommend you store the water at least 24 hours with an airstone and a bag of activated carbon in the storage container.  For the smaller changes, you are probably fine just storing it until the pH is stable.

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