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shakaho

Kokos Goldfish Forum Guidelines for Healthy Goldfish

32 posts in this topic

1 minute ago, shakaho said:

Does it make sense to you that a single fish needs 20 gallons of water, but with a tankmate, the same fish needs only 15 gallons, and give him 9 tankmates and he only needs 11 gallons? I assume whoever dreamed up this silly rule thought that a goldfish needed only 10 gallons of water, but looked at a adult goldfish in a 10 gallon tank and saw that the fish clearly needed more room.

You have correctly observed that increasing the frequency and/or the volume of water changes allows you to safely keep more fish in the same amount of water.

This was a thing years and years ago when Goldfish sites line mine where just starting out and we are where trying to get the information out there. No harm just old information :) We all know better now :) 

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It's also possible to keep fish in higher stocking levels with more frequent/larger water changes. These guidelines are to try and make the routines easier but it's definitely doable to keep higher stocking levels and several members do so :)

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Can anyone help with the diagnosis of this? I woke up yesterday and noticed he had this and today it’s got worse. The water quality seems to be fine as do the other fish. He seems fine within himself too and is eating. I added some general bacterial infection medicine from petsmart just now. Panicking as to what this is and what I should do?


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When you are discussing substrate did you say to use gravel that is either SMALL ENOUGH TO BE SWALLOWED or too large to get in their mouth?  Did i misunderstand that?  I think i would be freaking out if i saw my goldfish swallowing their gravel??  And of the three options, none, sand, and gravel...which do you think is optimal?

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In natural habitats, goldfish grab a mouthful of mud and skillfully spit out the sand and swallow the organic material.  In an aquarium with gravel the fish will instinctively try the same trick.  Large fish can get away with this with fine gravel, and may swallow some of the fine gravel without problems.  A mouth-sized stone can get stuck in a throat.  Usually one can get the stone out with a bit of work.

Nothing beats  bare bottom for ease of maintenance.  Fish prefer sand, but keeping sand clean takes  a little practice. Gravel collects debris.  Larger stones collect the most debris.  Bacteria decompose this debris, using up lots of oxygen and releasing lots of chemicals, some of which can harm the fish.

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31 minutes ago, shakaho said:

In natural habitats, goldfish grab a mouthful of mud and skillfully spit out the sand and swallow the organic material.  In an aquarium with gravel the fish will instinctively try the same trick.  Large fish can get away with this with fine gravel, and may swallow some of the fine gravel without problems.  A mouth-sized stone can get stuck in a throat.  Usually one can get the stone out with a bit of work.

Nothing beats  bare bottom for ease of maintenance.  Fish prefer sand, but keeping sand clean takes  a little practice. Gravel collects debris.  Larger stones collect the most debris.  Bacteria decompose this debris, using up lots of oxygen and releasing lots of chemicals, some of which can harm the fish.

Is it harder to maintain the biological filter with the bare bottom?

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The only difference in the maintenance of nitrifiers with various substrate conditions comes about with gravel or stones where pockets between the stones collect decaying debris, which use up oxygen.  The nitrifiers need oxygen to grow and oxidize ammonia/nitrite, so you will probably have a smaller population of nitrifiers on the bottom of a tank with these substrates.  You will still have nitrifiers growing on the walls of the tank.

The filter, with the large surface area of the biomedium and steady flow of water to provide oxygen and ammonia/nitrite, will always have the largest population of nitrifiers.  

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