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fup10k

Can you over-filter an aquarium?

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I happened upon a really good deal for a 75 gallon tank with a stand and fluval fx6 canister filter on craigslist

Well, it filters 562 GPH. From my understanding, with a canister filter you should filter only 5-7times your tank volume, which would be 525

 

I was only really planning to have my two current goldfish (maybe a snail or two) in there, and I was planning on keeping it planted.  Will I even generate enough waste to make sure the filter bacteria doesn't starve itself?  I'm sure once my fish are fully grown it will be easier, but for now Suna is the only one who is large and Antares is only about 3-4". 

 

The tank will be set up in August and after cycling, it should be done in September. 5-6 months away is enough time for Antares to grow a lot but somehow I still doubt that they'd make much waste. 

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Not at all... I have a 40g with a filter GPH of 600 and my cycle is just fine when I can I will probably get more filtration with a canister added. I was always told the more filtration the better

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The only time a tank is overfiltered is when the current is too strong for the fish. If they aren't struggling, you're just fine.

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I've seen people write "you can never have to much filtration, just to much flow." I think the filter will be great. Pretty sure there are quite a few of us here that have 10x filtration using canisters only.

I'll let someone else explain the bacteria, but my understanding is that they are constantly increasingly/decreasing to adjust to the load in your tank. As long as you are not under filtered, the bacteria will adjust themselves to your systems load. And 2 goldfish produce a lot of waste, your filter will have plenty to do! hehe.

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Agree with all.

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I've seen people write "you can never have to much filtration, just to much flow." I think the filter will be great. Pretty sure there are quite a few of us here that have 10x filtration using canisters only.

I'll let someone else explain the bacteria, but my understanding is that they are constantly increasingly/decreasing to adjust to the load in your tank. As long as you are not under filtered, the bacteria will adjust themselves to your systems load. And 2 goldfish produce a lot of waste, your filter will have plenty to do! hehe.

This is pretty much the simplest way to explain it. :)  :testkit:

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The 5 - 7 times is a basicminimum recommendation, not maximum. If they fish don't look like they're being pushed around or struggling to swim from the intake, you're fine. You can also use a spray bar so the flow is dispersed more. :)

I'd love to have that filter on my 75.

Edited by Chai

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I was only really planning to have my two current goldfish (maybe a snail or two) in there, and I was planning on keeping it planted.  Will I even generate enough waste to make sure the filter bacteria doesn't starve itself?  I'm sure once my fish are fully grown it will be easier, but for now Suna is the only one who is large and Antares is only about 3-4". 

 

The tank will be set up in August and after cycling, it should be done in September. 5-6 months away is enough time for Antares to grow a lot but somehow I still doubt that they'd make much waste. 

Regardless of how many fish you have, you will grow as many nitrifiers as is needed for your fish load.  In a cycled tank, (or any other stable ecosystem) the nitrifiers are in "stationary phase" of the growth curve.

 

06-20_MicrobialGrowth_L-1.jpg

 

In the stationary phase, as many die as duplicate, and the rest are just "getting by" with enough resources to survive and function, but not enough to get fat and divide.  Those guys and ready and eager for larger meals.  This is why you can add another fish to a cycled tank and not get a cycle bump.

 

I assume you have a filter in your current tank.  When you get the new tank, just set it up, put in both the new filter and the old one and add your fish.  The nitrifiers in your current filter will take care of the ammonia produced by your fish and will seed the new filter.  After a few weeks, you can remove the old filter and put it to other use.

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Oh OK! I was just worried for nothing then I guess. I'll discuss it with the seller then, thank you so much for the advice on this.

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Another tip: You can move the cycled filter media from the old tank into the new filter, and your cycle should remain intact. So you don't need to cycle the new tank if you can move the old media over. :)

Edited by ChelseaM

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More to consider... The bacteria in the existing tank will be established on pretty much all surfaces. The glass of the tank, the substrate, the decorations, the filter housing itself.... Transferring just the media will result in less bacteria being in the new tank. Yes you can transfer over just the media, but this has caused bumps for some people. I would transfer over as much material as possible. 

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More to consider... The bacteria in the existing tank will be established on pretty much all surfaces. The glass of the tank, the substrate, the decorations, the filter housing itself.... Transferring just the media will result in less bacteria being in the new tank. Yes you can transfer over just the media, but this has caused bumps for some people. I would transfer over as much material as possible. 

Jason, this was debated a bit in this thread. Sharon's post (#16) explains things pretty perfectly.

 

It also might provide a little more info about moving too, Fup10k. :) It'd be worth a skim.

 

edited: Ah! Sharon already transferred the same info over here too. :rofl  

Edited by ChelseaM

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More to consider... The bacteria in the existing tank will be established on pretty much all surfaces. The glass of the tank, the substrate, the decorations, the filter housing itself.... Transferring just the media will result in less bacteria being in the new tank. Yes you can transfer over just the media, but this has caused bumps for some people. I would transfer over as much material as possible. 

Jason, this was debated a bit in this thread. Sharon's post (#16) explains things pretty perfectly.

 

It also might provide a little more info about moving too, Fup10k. :) It'd be worth a skim.

 

edited: Ah! Sharon already transferred the same info over here too. :rofl

 

The great Shakaho herself suggested moving the entire filter over in this thread.  There really isn't a way to estimate what percent If the bacteria is in the filter material vs on the other surfaces. It is also important to realize that most people do not modify their filters with "custom" media configurations so there may really only be a small amount to move over. For example up until I bought media for my fluval 405's within the past 6 months, I had been using the "stock" media in all 6 aquarium filters I had going. Very small amount of room for bacteria to establish on compared to the large surface area of my tanks.

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More to consider... The bacteria in the existing tank will be established on pretty much all surfaces. The glass of the tank, the substrate, the decorations, the filter housing itself.... Transferring just the media will result in less bacteria being in the new tank. Yes you can transfer over just the media, but this has caused bumps for some people. I would transfer over as much material as possible.

Jason, this was debated a bit in this thread. Sharon's post (#16) explains things pretty perfectly.

 

It also might provide a little more info about moving too, Fup10k. :) It'd be worth a skim.

 

edited: Ah! Sharon already transferred the same info over here too. :rofl

Oh my GOSH that barebottom is a gorgeous tank! I'm so jealous. That was a really great read, and it got me thinking :

If there really is no such thing as over filtration, should I consider running the new filter with my tank currently as well? That way there's less to worry about for moving time to the big one :)

Also.... Should I consider re-sealing this tank I'm getting? It looks fairly new but it will likely sit in an attic or in storage and i'm worried about it holding water well. I'd rather spend the $20 to resilicone than pay for water damages in my apartment :(

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More to consider... The bacteria in the existing tank will be established on pretty much all surfaces. The glass of the tank, the substrate, the decorations, the filter housing itself.... Transferring just the media will result in less bacteria being in the new tank. Yes you can transfer over just the media, but this has caused bumps for some people. I would transfer over as much material as possible. 

Jason, this was debated a bit in this thread. Sharon's post (#16) explains things pretty perfectly.

 

It also might provide a little more info about moving too, Fup10k. :) It'd be worth a skim.

 

edited: Ah! Sharon already transferred the same info over here too. :rofl

 

The great Shakaho herself suggested moving the entire filter over in this thread.  There really isn't a way to estimate what percent If the bacteria is in the filter material vs on the other surfaces. It is also important to realize that most people do not modify their filters with "custom" media configurations so there may really only be a small amount to move over. For example up until I bought media for my fluval 405's within the past 6 months, I had been using the "stock" media in all 6 aquarium filters I had going. Very small amount of room for bacteria to establish on compared to the large surface area of my tanks.

 

She did, however, explain that moving the substrate over is not necessary in the other thread. That's what I am getting at. The filters and media are fine, the rest is not necessary.

 

Similar advice is given for new keepers who are using "stock" media in their filters when they get to Koko's: To seed your new media, simply cut out the carbon and place the old cartridge in with the new media. I'm sure you either ran your old filter with the new one or transferred media when you put the canisters on, right?

 

 

Oh my GOSH that barebottom is a gorgeous tank! I'm so jealous. That was a really great read, and it got me thinking :

If there really is no such thing as over filtration, should I consider running the new filter with my tank currently as well? That way there's less to worry about for moving time to the big one :)

Also.... Should I consider re-sealing this tank I'm getting? It looks fairly new but it will likely sit in an attic or in storage and i'm worried about it holding water well. I'd rather spend the $20 to resilicone than pay for water damages in my apartment :(

 

If you'd like, certainly run all the filters together for a couple weeks. Just make sure the current isn't too much for the fish. 

 

A used tank tip I always see on Koko's is to do the following:

  1. Place the tank on a towel or other surface that will make it easy to detect a leak (Outside is the best place for this, if possible)
  2. fill the tank and leave it for 24 hours to see if it leaks.

Or, if possible, 

 

Have the seller fill the tank for you just before you get there. That way, you can see if it leaks.

 

 

Resealing is a pain in the tush. So if you can check for leaks first, that's always good. 

 

Have you worked out an idea as to how you'll sterilize the new tank?

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I stuffed extra media in the existing filters for a few weeks and then transferred that into the bottom of the new filter and left the existing filters running as well. 

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I stuffed extra media in the existing filters for a few weeks and then transferred that into the bottom of the new filter and left the existing filters running as well. 

That definitely works!

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If you'd like, certainly run all the filters together for a couple weeks. Just make sure the current isn't too much for the fish. 

 

A used tank tip I always see on Koko's is to do the following:

  1. Place the tank on a towel or other surface that will make it easy to detect a leak (Outside is the best place for this, if possible)
  2. fill the tank and leave it for 24 hours to see if it leaks.

Or, if possible, 

 

Have the seller fill the tank for you just before you get there. That way, you can see if it leaks.

 

 

Resealing is a pain in the tush. So if you can check for leaks first, that's always good. 

 

Have you worked out an idea as to how you'll sterilize the new tank?

 

 

I got the seller to agree to fill it some time tomorrow for when i pick it up monday. :) I'm mainly concerned about it sitting in storage over the summer though. It's very hot and humid here so i'm not sure how the silicone will stand up to it. I'll probably test it a few months in storage too, to see how its doing. 

 

I haven't actually thought about Sterilizing it.... i was thinking rubbing alcohol would do the trick, but if that's damaging just let me know. (Any advice would be appreciated, really!)

 

 

I stuffed extra media in the existing filters for a few weeks and then transferred that into the bottom of the new filter and left the existing filters running as well. 

 

That sounds great, but my HOB is currently filled to the brim haha. I will definitely be using the filter media that i have now, and I'll just run the other one for a few weeks before i actually move. 

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Rubbing alcohol might damage the silicone. You could use Bleach or Vinegar. Bleach is less expensive. a 1:9 ratio of bleach to water, followed by lots of rinsing and drying in the sun would be a good way to sterilize it. When you get to that point, let someone know and a more detailed walkthrough can be written.

 

Aquariums sit in warehouses for quite a bit of time before they're sold. I personally have aquariums I keep in the garage for months on end in the summer, since I keep my fish in a big preformed pond during the summer months, and everything does fine. The 'filling the tank' thing will help you to determine if there are any leaks that need fixing. :)

Edited by ChelseaM

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Rubbing alcohol is a weak disinfectant.  Soap and water would work better.  Bleach and potassium permanganate are both effective disinfectants for an aquarium..

 

100% vinegar for 30 minutes is a pretty good disinfectant, but that requires you to either fill the tank with vinegar, which would cost about as much as a new tank, or keep the sides of the tank wet with vinegar for 30 minutes, which is a bit of work.

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Rubbing alcohol might damage the silicone. You could use Bleach or Vinegar. Bleach is less expensive. a 1:9 ratio of bleach to water, followed by lots of rinsing and drying in the sun would be a good way to sterilize it. When you get to that point, let someone know and a more detailed walkthrough can be written.

 

Aquariums sit in warehouses for quite a bit of time before they're sold. I personally have aquariums I keep in the garage for months on end in the summer, since I keep my fish in a big preformed pond during the summer months, and everything does fine. The 'filling the tank' thing will help you to determine if there are any leaks that need fixing. :)

 

Bleach sounds like a good idea. :) Should i worry about doing this before or after placing it into storage? (Or, both?)

 

Rubbing alcohol is a weak disinfectant.  Soap and water would work better.  Bleach and potassium permanganate are both effective disinfectants for an aquarium..

 

100% vinegar for 30 minutes is a pretty good disinfectant, but that requires you to either fill the tank with vinegar, which would cost about as much as a new tank, or keep the sides of the tank wet with vinegar for 30 minutes, which is a bit of work.

 

I can't imagine myself using vinegar to begin with. the smell makes me want to vomit already lol. I could maybe force my BF to spray the tank for 30 minutes, but, I think bleach may be an easier option. 

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I would not worry about it until you're going to use it, lest you have to do it again when you get it back out! :)

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If you aren't going to set up the tank until August, all you have to do is give it a good scrubbing, store it dry and clean off the storage dirt before use.  No pathogens/parasites will survive 5 months dry. 

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SO ACTUALLY, I GOT THERE and the tank was horribly scratched up he had silicone piled up on the edges and it was all just in horrible shape. I decided just to let it go lol. I'd rather buy a new one

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