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Jes

Should I take the plunge?

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Hey,

In January I am thinking of taking the hobby to the next level. I would like to have a go at breeding. I just wanted to know with your experiences how much work and time is involved and if it's something I can work into my sparetime as I am in full time work.

If I do go ahead where would be the best place to start?

Thanks for your help.

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I think most people here became breeders accidentally.  Read through the breeding threads - SweetMamaKaty or HinFin have current ones - and see if it is something you want to be involved with.  One of the most important things is to think about how you would sell/give away the fish.  Some people also have difficulty with culling, getting rid of the fry that are not what you are aiming for.  

 

It really does sound like a rewarding hobby, as long as you have thought out the details. Good luck.

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Suzanne is right! :rofl Many of us one day went :yikes are those eggs!?

And fry are time consuming! Another thing to consider in addition to culling and what to do with the fish when they're big enough is what to feed them when they are itty bitty!

Many of us hatched baby brine shrimp (bbs). This is kinda constly and IMHO a big pain in the pants. :o

I definitely agree that you should read the breeder threads and laugh thru our struggles :lol

And you never know.... You may be a goldfish "breeder" sooner than you think :)

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I wholeheartedly agree with what the others have said. :) The time commitment is up there, but it is so rewarding too. I think being prepared ahead of time, both with supplies and the mental emotional fortitude it requires will be a big factor in your success.

It sounds like you and I have a couple differences - I am a stay at home mom, so while still quite busy, I do have a lot of flexibility with my time. This was especially helpful for the multiple feedings they require to grow quickly. If you can get home on a lunch break it would be great! One advantage you may have (though I don't know your situation) is fewer busy little hands ;) and therefore the freedom to set up some proper tubs however you like and have a really great setup. That would make it even more enjoyable I think, and possible for you to step it up to a level I can't go to right now. :)

I would start by reading all you can, especially the AGA standards, so you have a very clear picture in mind for your selected type. Also reading the successes and failures of others is great because it gives you a real life picture of some of the pitfalls. I would also write out your goals and how you plan to get there. For example, if you're interested in the genetics aspect and trying to breed for certain traits, trying to breed quality fish to sell, or trying for the offspring of current beloved fish, you will have fairly big differences in how you proceed. I would recommend not skimping on the feedings and water changes, because they make a big difference - go big or go home. :lol3 And really - the fortitude to continue as intentionally as you begin, in terms of the hard choices that are inevitable. I think that's the part I was not really prepared for.

Good luck, it sounds exciting! :D

Edited by SweetMamaKaty

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For me, raising fry isn't much harder than keeping grown fish. You need to feed more often and keep up on water changes. I feed store bought food. Finding homes for the possibility of 100 or more fish is the hard part.

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Thankyou for your help. I will do lots of research. In they UK its extremely hard to get hold of good quality butterflies. So i would like to focus on them. So genetics would properly be my path. My biggest worry at the moment is finding fish that don't have the same parents. And also i have 8 fish ( not all in the same tank) and are all around 4-5 inches. But i can't seem to find breeding stars on any of them! They can all possibly be females. Is it the time of year? So this makes me worry i would buy to fish and they ended up being the same gender.

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Suzanne is right! :rofl Many of us one day went :yikes are those eggs!?

And fry are time consuming! Another thing to consider in addition to culling and what to do with the fish when they're big enough is what to feed them when they are itty bitty!

Many of us hatched baby brine shrimp (bbs). This is kinda constly and IMHO a big pain in the pants. :o

I definitely agree that you should read the breeder threads and laugh thru our struggles :lol

And you never know.... You may be a goldfish "breeder" sooner than you think :)

 

 

I wholeheartedly agree with what the others have said. :) The time commitment is up there, but it is so rewarding too. I think being prepared ahead of time, both with supplies and the mental emotional fortitude it requires will be a big factor in your success.

It sounds like you and I have a couple differences - I am a stay at home mom, so while still quite busy, I do have a lot of flexibility with my time. This was especially helpful for the multiple feedings they require to grow quickly. If you can get home on a lunch break it would be great! One advantage you may have (though I don't know your situation) is fewer busy little hands ;) and therefore the freedom to set up some proper tubs however you like and have a really great setup. That would make it even more enjoyable I think, and possible for you to step it up to a level I can't go to right now. :)

I would start by reading all you can, especially the AGA standards, so you have a very clear picture in mind for your selected type. Also reading the successes and failures of others is great because it gives you a real life picture of some of the pitfalls. I would also write out your goals and how you plan to get there. For example, if you're interested in the genetics aspect and trying to breed for certain traits, trying to breed quality fish to sell, or trying for the offspring of current beloved fish, you will have fairly big differences in how you proceed. I would recommend not skimping on the feedings and water changes, because they make a big difference - go big or go home. :lol3 And really - the fortitude to continue as intentionally as you begin, in terms of the hard choices that are inevitable. I think that's the part I was not really prepared for.

Good luck, it sounds exciting! :D

sorry forgot to quote 

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Raising my baby fish has been extremely fun for me and rewarding; however, I don't think I could be a breeder.  I really find it difficult to cull.  I had 40 babies and now I am down to 19.  I wasn't able to cull any myself.  Luckily I have 3 ponds...a 700 gallon with 9 fish, and two 300 gallon ponds, so I have some extra room.  I would like to only have the 700 gallon pond in use, so I will have to give away some of the babies in the summer.  I even think that will be hard for me :).  Good luck and have fun if you decide to breed your goldies!

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With 8, it's unlikely (although not impossible) that they are all female.  My fish only really displays stars in the warmer weather, although the front edge of his side fins are always thicker.

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Hey,

In January I am thinking of taking the hobby to the next level. I would like to have a go at breeding. I just wanted to know with your experiences how much work and time is involved and if it's something I can work into my sparetime as I am in full time work.

If I do go ahead where would be the best place to start?

Thanks for your help.

 

Getting some goldfish eggs to grow out is a good place to start :teehee

 

Its not a problem to fit breeding into a fulltime job routine, youll need to get up early and skip on watching TV in the evening untill the work is done. How much time youll need depends in how well you have set up and how big your spawn is. There is not much really costly about breeding in terms of gear, a few sponge filters, tubs and used tanks will go a long way. Only a better brineshrimp hatchery can be costly but using bottles does work if in a tight spot. A breeding setup can just be stored(stacking tubs!) untill you have time to breed again, so its a one time investment.

 

The culling part is hard and very different when you have a large spawn or just a few fish. Probably everyone can imagine when facing hundreds of fry you know you need to cut the numbers to keep them healthy. I 'console' myself with the fact that nature does not provide this natural selection so i have to do it. The parents of the fry often get the culls like it should be. Ive read that in nature only about 1% of total eggs layed make it to adults.

 

I'm saying i have to console myself with the idea because it is hard, some even say: Cull till it hurts, then cull more!

 

The is a but i must say in all honesty, sometimes i see someone growing out really deformed fish and i realise it IS a must in goldfish breeding to cull those that are not good or even nice looking. I do understand that someone has a hard time culling older fry, so learning what to cull for and culling as early as possible is very important because its simply easier.

 

Harsh as that all may sound it belongs to goldfish breeding, another part is that you should not expect too much. Many things can go wrong and there is a big chance you wont be able to get one nice looking and healthy fish from a spawn.

 

You can increase chances of breeding decent fish if you up the scale of things, handspawn the eggs instead of scraping them from the bottom of the tank, all ways to increase numbers and therefore the chance your effort will give you beautyfull and healthy fish!

 

This to me is the ultimate goal, if for some reason i do not think i will be able to reach that goal ill just clean out that spawn. That is what my task is as a hobby breeder, provide extremely good care for the fry and make sure i end up with healthy truely beautyfull fish to rehome!

Edited by Hinfin

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Hey,

In January I am thinking of taking the hobby to the next level. I would like to have a go at breeding. I just wanted to know with your experiences how much work and time is involved and if it's something I can work into my sparetime as I am in full time work.

If I do go ahead where would be the best place to start?

Thanks for your help.

Getting some goldfish eggs to grow out is a good place to start :teehee

Its not a problem to fit breeding into a fulltime job routine, youll need to get up early and skip on watching TV in the evening untill the work is done. How much time youll need depends in how well you have set up and how big your spawn is. There is not much really costly about breeding in terms of gear, a few sponge filters, tubs and used tanks will go a long way. Only a better brineshrimp hatchery can be costly but using bottles does work if in a tight spot. A breeding setup can just be stored(stacking tubs!) untill you have time to breed again, so its a one time investment.

The culling part is hard and very different when you have a large spawn or just a few fish. Probably everyone can imagine when facing hundreds of fry you know you need to cut the numbers to keep them healthy. I 'console' myself with the fact that nature does not provide this natural selection so i have to do it. The parents of the fry often get the culls like it should be. Ive read that in nature only about 1% of total eggs layed make it to adults.

I'm saying i have to console myself with the idea because it is hard, some even say: Cull till it hurts, then cull more!

The is a but i must say in all honesty, sometimes i see someone growing out really deformed fish and i realise it IS a must in goldfish breeding to cull those that are not good or even nice looking. I do understand that someone has a hard time culling older fry, so learning what to cull for and culling as early as possible is very important because its simply easier.

Harsh as that all may sound it belongs to goldfish breeding, another part is that you should not expect too much. Many things can go wrong and there is a big chance you wont be able to get one nice looking and healthy fish from a spawn.

You can increase chances of breeding decent fish if you up the scale of things, handspawn the eggs instead of scraping them from the bottom of the tank, all ways to increase numbers and therefore the chance your effort will give you beautyfull and healthy fish!

This to me is the ultimate goal, if for some reason i do not think i will be able to reach that goal ill just clean out that spawn. That is what my task is as a hobby breeder, provide extremely good care for the fry and make sure i end up with healthy truely beautyfull fish to rehome!

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Sorry Hinfin! I posted by accident! Thanku for your reply. For me, the work is not an issue. I love caring for my fish and I enjoy the simple things like water changes. The culling Like u said is a massive part of breeding fish so I would be prepared to do it. Especially if it means I can spend more time bringing up beautiful and healthy babies ????

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Ahah, so you do know.......

 

I have bred Koi and my father before me, many years tought me to see there is no way to cheat in this hobby of ours. If you ever want need my help be sure to ask.

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Ahah, so you do know.......

I have bred Koi and my father before me, many years tought me to see there is no way to cheat in this hobby of ours. If you ever want need my help be sure to ask.

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Thank you Hinfin, that's very kind. Is there a a time of year that is the best to start bring on spawning conditions or does it not really matter if u are encouraging it?

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Springtime is best, then you can look forward to growing fish out in ponds etc. If you breed during winter, like i am now, you must rehome fry very early or think of some way to heat large quantities of water which will be very expensive. You can condition fish to spawn in spring, but not young fish in their first year. Those will have eggs when they reach maturity and need to be spawned then. Most breeders will not use these first eggs but will wait for them to be conditioned and spawning in springtime.

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