Jump to content
Kokos Goldfish Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Tuba Toothpaste

So I've been thinking....

Recommended Posts

So I've been raising my goldfish fry for 2 weeks now, and it's been the most fun I've had in a long time (I'm lame). I think I'm really getting the hang of it now. And it's got me thinking, if I am able to raise this batch of fry successfully, maybe it would be fun to move onto breeding some really high quality goldfish to sell! I wouldn't be doing it to make a lot of money or anything, just for fun. And then maybe I could enter them into goldfish shows and stuff! I think I'd like to breed ranchus, because they are my favorite. :)

The only problem is, I don't really know much about what makes a show quality goldfish. Where can I buy good quality fish to start out with? Is there a handbook out there that thoroughly explains all the standards of the different breeds?

This is just a theory at the moment so I might not actually go through with it. But I want to learn as much as I can, because it just seems like it could be a lot of fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good idea, just do it! The best job is hobbies job!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good idea, just do it! The best job is hobbies job!

I really think I want to! I just have no idea where to start...like where should I get my ranchus to start with? And what characteristics should I be looking for? o:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In general I think that at first of all you need patient. Find info how aquarium breeders breed fish in home condition, step by step provide equipment for goldfish breeding, find quality Ranchu goldies (they are pritty expensive) and start. By the way around 50-70% of Ranchos fry have body defect, that was shared from friend of mine who breeds Goldfish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

East coast ranchu sells beautiful fish. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In general I think that at first of all you need patient. Find info how aquarium breeders breed fish in home condition, step by step provide equipment for goldfish breeding, find quality Ranchu goldies (they are pritty expensive) and start. By the way around 50-70% of Ranchos fry have body defect, that was shared from friend of mine who breeds Goldfish.

That sounds like a good idea. I'm thinking about going to the Middle Georgia Koi & Goldfish Show next weekend, maybe I can learn more there? o;

East coast ranchu sells beautiful fish. :)

I've been thinking about checking them out, they seem to have a great selection!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a short clip of that friend of mine who breeds Goldfish and other aquarium fish as well.

He is in Bulgaria.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a short clip of that friend of mine who breeds Goldfish and other aquarium fish as well.

He is in Bulgaria.

Omg your friend's ranchus are so beautiful! I hope I can breed ranchus that look that good some day. o;

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

east coast ranchu and dandy orandas :thumb:
i'm considering a similar venture myself, but i want to focus on orandas :P:heart

also, goldfishnet.com often has really nice high-quality goldfish :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

east coast ranchu and dandy orandas :thumb:

i'm considering a similar venture myself, but i want to focus on orandas :P:heart

also, goldfishnet.com often has really nice high-quality goldfish :D

I hadn't heard of goldfish net, I'll have to check them out!

Aww I love orandas too! I love any goldie with a big squishy wen. xP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is goldfish breeding fish room of the same person :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is goldfish breeding fish room of the same person :)

THAT IS SO COOL!!

Look at all those tanks! And all those babies! And that filtration system!!! AHHHHHHHH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a few words of advice and I think they are essential to anyone looking to breed goldfish either as a hobby or on a large scale: (not directed at you solely! Just for anyone reading this since I feel like I've seen a few posts like this recently)

1) Know the breed standards. Don't breed something because you feel it's pretty. If you have the intention to breed and show highquality fish than you need to be aware of what makes a fish 'high quality'. Have a 'ideal' fish in mind when you breed, what will you be selecting for and how will you establish that in your lines down the road? Talk to other breeders, see how they raise their fish and select for culls. Read A LOT. I think Fancy goldfish by Rich Hess is a great starting point as far as reading goes but there are a ton of resources online as well.

2)Do no expect to make any money, in fact, expect to lose money or at best break even. Fish are very expensive and buying broodstock to start lines is often not cheap. The easiest way to get good babies is to have good parents, and that means starting from fish that are higher than pet quality. I'm not going to say exactly how much I spent on my 3 pearlscale that I'm using for my broodstock but it was quite a bit, and even then I wouldn't say they are the highest quality out there. Then factor in electricity bills, water bills, filters, medications, food, tubs and tanks, etc. The list just goes on and on, and it really adds up to a lot of money.

3)Space. You need a lot of space. Baby fish start out small but imagine having 400+ baby fish, where are they all going to go when they're 3+inches and ready for sale? you do cull many of them but you need a lot of water, filtration, and water changes to keep them all healthy and thriving.

4) This brings us to my next point; culling. Culling involves euthanizing fish who are deformed or do not possess trait you desire. Many less desirable but yet not imperfect fish can still be raised and sold off, but that is a personal decision. You have to be mentally able to cull fish that are deformed or will not thrive.

There are also many other factors to consider before you delve into the wide world of goldfish breeding and I certainly don't mean to discourage you! But raising goldfish and breeding in general is expensive, time consuming, and at times quite hard. Really make sure you know common illnesses and how to treat as well as making sure you preventatively treat all your stock for external parasites. This will help keep your fish healthy and avoid system wide crashes you see happen when these factors are overlooked. For me personally, I bought pearlscale broodstock with the sole intention of making this breed more widely available in the US. Most of the pearlies that are sold in LFS or chain stores are very low quality, and I don't know of anyone who breeds them. So my goal is more or less to get them into the hands of hobbyists and breeders and increase the number of high quality pearlscales overall. With just 3 fish atm though it will definitely be a pretty long journey! :rofl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a few words of advice and I think they are essential to anyone looking to breed goldfish either as a hobby or on a large scale: (not directed at you solely! Just for anyone reading this since I feel like I've seen a few posts like this recently)

1) Know the breed standards. Don't breed something because you feel it's pretty. If you have the intention to breed and show highquality fish than you need to be aware of what makes a fish 'high quality'. Have a 'ideal' fish in mind when you breed, what will you be selecting for and how will you establish that in your lines down the road? Talk to other breeders, see how they raise their fish and select for culls. Read A LOT. I think Fancy goldfish by Rich Hess is a great starting point as far as reading goes but there are a ton of resources online as well.

2)Do no expect to make any money, in fact, expect to lose money or at best break even. Fish are very expensive and buying broodstock to start lines is often not cheap. The easiest way to get good babies is to have good parents, and that means starting from fish that are higher than pet quality. I'm not going to say exactly how much I spent on my 3 pearlscale that I'm using for my broodstock but it was quite a bit, and even then I wouldn't say they are the highest quality out there. Then factor in electricity bills, water bills, filters, medications, food, tubs and tanks, etc. The list just goes on and on, and it really adds up to a lot of money.

3)Space. You need a lot of space. Baby fish start out small but imagine having 400+ baby fish, where are they all going to go when they're 3+inches and ready for sale? you do cull many of them but you need a lot of water, filtration, and water changes to keep them all healthy and thriving.

4) This brings us to my next point; culling. Culling involves euthanizing fish who are deformed or do not possess trait you desire. Many less desirable but yet not imperfect fish can still be raised and sold off, but that is a personal decision. You have to be mentally able to cull fish that are deformed or will not thrive.

There are also many other factors to consider before you delve into the wide world of goldfish breeding and I certainly don't mean to discourage you! But raising goldfish and breeding in general is expensive, time consuming, and at times quite hard. Really make sure you know common illnesses and how to treat as well as making sure you preventatively treat all your stock for external parasites. This will help keep your fish healthy and avoid system wide crashes you see happen when these factors are overlooked. For me personally, I bought pearlscale broodstock with the sole intention of making this breed more widely available in the US. Most of the pearlies that are sold in LFS or chain stores are very low quality, and I don't know of anyone who breeds them. So my goal is more or less to get them into the hands of hobbyists and breeders and increase the number of high quality pearlscales overall. With just 3 fish atm though it will definitely be a pretty long journey! :rofl

:goodjob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a few words of advice and I think they are essential to anyone looking to breed goldfish either as a hobby or on a large scale: (not directed at you solely! Just for anyone reading this since I feel like I've seen a few posts like this recently)

1) Know the breed standards. Don't breed something because you feel it's pretty. If you have the intention to breed and show highquality fish than you need to be aware of what makes a fish 'high quality'. Have a 'ideal' fish in mind when you breed, what will you be selecting for and how will you establish that in your lines down the road? Talk to other breeders, see how they raise their fish and select for culls. Read A LOT. I think Fancy goldfish by Rich Hess is a great starting point as far as reading goes but there are a ton of resources online as well.

2)Do no expect to make any money, in fact, expect to lose money or at best break even. Fish are very expensive and buying broodstock to start lines is often not cheap. The easiest way to get good babies is to have good parents, and that means starting from fish that are higher than pet quality. I'm not going to say exactly how much I spent on my 3 pearlscale that I'm using for my broodstock but it was quite a bit, and even then I wouldn't say they are the highest quality out there. Then factor in electricity bills, water bills, filters, medications, food, tubs and tanks, etc. The list just goes on and on, and it really adds up to a lot of money.

3)Space. You need a lot of space. Baby fish start out small but imagine having 400+ baby fish, where are they all going to go when they're 3+inches and ready for sale? you do cull many of them but you need a lot of water, filtration, and water changes to keep them all healthy and thriving.

4) This brings us to my next point; culling. Culling involves euthanizing fish who are deformed or do not possess trait you desire. Many less desirable but yet not imperfect fish can still be raised and sold off, but that is a personal decision. You have to be mentally able to cull fish that are deformed or will not thrive.

There are also many other factors to consider before you delve into the wide world of goldfish breeding and I certainly don't mean to discourage you! But raising goldfish and breeding in general is expensive, time consuming, and at times quite hard. Really make sure you know common illnesses and how to treat as well as making sure you preventatively treat all your stock for external parasites. This will help keep your fish healthy and avoid system wide crashes you see happen when these factors are overlooked. For me personally, I bought pearlscale broodstock with the sole intention of making this breed more widely available in the US. Most of the pearlies that are sold in LFS or chain stores are very low quality, and I don't know of anyone who breeds them. So my goal is more or less to get them into the hands of hobbyists and breeders and increase the number of high quality pearlscales overall. With just 3 fish atm though it will definitely be a pretty long journey! :rofl

Thank you for the detailed response! This was really helpful! :D

Do you have any advice on how I can learn more about breed standards? That is what I feel the most ignorant about. Are there very many books on the subject? I've been able to find a little bit of vague info on the internet on breed characteristics, but nothing in depth. Hopefully if I go to the goldfish show next weekend I'll be able to talk to some breeders there.

I think the best way for me to start is gathering the materials I'm going to need gradually, like filters and medications and tanks and whatnot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there is a book called 'Spike's goldfish guide',
it outlines the physical standards for nearly every goldfish type :)
it used to be available on goldfish connection, although i don't think it is anymore.

Edited by Elisa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there is a book called 'Spike's goldfish guide',

it outlines the physical standards for nearly every goldfish type :)

Thanks! I'll check it out. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

East coast ranchu sells beautiful fish. :)

Yes they do!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With ranchu there are different standards for the 2 different types. There are SVR side view ranchu (this is what I breed) and there are TVR top view ranchu. I would also suggest sticking to breeding one specific color. Don't just grab a bunch of pretty fish, have a goal in mind of the shape and color you are aiming for. There are even different shapes of wen to consider.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With ranchu there are different standards for the 2 different types. There are SVR side view ranchu (this is what I breed) and there are TVR top view ranchu. I would also suggest sticking to breeding one specific color. Don't just grab a bunch of pretty fish, have a goal in mind of the shape and color you are aiming for. There are even different shapes of wen to consider.

Oh ok! So by specific color do you mean I should pick a single solid color, or just a specific color combination?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A solid color would be best to start with if you don't want to cull for color like some breeders do. It also gives you time to focus and learn about the body requirements and let you train your eye to it vs, being tempted to keep fish not up to standard just because of pretty or unique coloring, which is fun! But its not great if your doing a breeding program and have limited space. I also want to add that you may want to get more fish experience and reading materials before you take on this project. I have learned SOOOOOO much just over the last 2 years. I don't know your fish keeping experience, but I can say that for myself over the time I have been a member here on kokos I have really learned a lot. I felt like an expert by the time I had 500 posts and now looking back I was a novice still :rolleyes: LOL I probably will look back again someday and think wow I knew nothing at 2000 posts :teehee Just know it is an expensive learning experience but if you love it, it is rewarding and fun. Making a profit is something the experienced get to do; I'm not even there yet. Stock up on meds, tanks/stock tubs, air pumps, various foods, jugs of prime, tons of prazi, and you will most of all need some extra time and money to dedicate to the hobby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A solid color would be best to start with if you don't want to cull for color like some breeders do. It also gives you time to focus and learn about the body requirements and let you train your eye to it vs, being tempted to keep fish not up to standard just because of pretty or unique coloring, which is fun! But its not great if your doing a breeding program and have limited space. I also want to add that you may want to get more fish experience and reading materials before you take on this project. I have learned SOOOOOO much just over the last 2 years. I don't know your fish keeping experience, but I can say that for myself over the time I have been a member here on kokos I have really learned a lot. I felt like an expert by the time I had 500 posts and now looking back I was a novice still :rolleyes: LOL I probably will look back again someday and think wow I knew nothing at 2000 posts :teehee Just know it is an expensive learning experience but if you love it, it is rewarding and fun. Making a profit is something the experienced get to do; I'm not even there yet. Stock up on meds, tanks/stock tubs, air pumps, various foods, jugs of prime, tons of prazi, and you will most of all need some extra time and money to dedicate to the hobby.

Thank you for the advice! I definitely won't be starting anytime soon anyway, so in the meantime I can do a bunch of research and troll Craigslist for fish supplies. xD

I'm still relatively new at this, so I've got a lot if learning to do!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A solid color would be best to start with if you don't want to cull for color like some breeders do. It also gives you time to focus and learn about the body requirements and let you train your eye to it vs, being tempted to keep fish not up to standard just because of pretty or unique coloring, which is fun! But its not great if your doing a breeding program and have limited space. I also want to add that you may want to get more fish experience and reading materials before you take on this project. I have learned SOOOOOO much just over the last 2 years. I don't know your fish keeping experience, but I can say that for myself over the time I have been a member here on kokos I have really learned a lot. I felt like an expert by the time I had 500 posts and now looking back I was a novice still :rolleyes: LOL I probably will look back again someday and think wow I knew nothing at 2000 posts :teehee Just know it is an expensive learning experience but if you love it, it is rewarding and fun. Making a profit is something the experienced get to do; I'm not even there yet. Stock up on meds, tanks/stock tubs, air pumps, various foods, jugs of prime, tons of prazi, and you will most of all need some extra time and money to dedicate to the hobby.

I think we'll all feel like novices the rest of our time in the hobby. I think that when you feel like an expert, that is when you need to step back and say "What else can I do to learn?"

The only thing I have to disagree with in MK's post is that "You shouldn't just breed what you think is pretty."

I understand the desire to keep certain types of fish alive with good lines. But I also would like to point out that we have seen many new goldfish in the US like the 'Telescope Eyed Ranchu' that Ken is importing quite a few of and Steve Hopkins' 'Pua'a.' Fish like this were probably at one point considered 'deformities' in the goldfish world that could pollute the lines of fish we have, but have since turned into favored 'oddball' goldfish and could in the future be recognized as actual types of goldfish.

I think it could better be worded as "Be prepared to take into consideration what you are looking for, especially with established types." Or something similar. Just my :twocents

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

Photo of the week winner!


Pic of the week poll #18


×
  • Create New...