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JACKHAGGETT

Help this newby!

9 posts in this topic

Hello!

So I'm relatively new to fish keeping. Because of REALLY bad circumstances, I have ended up with two single tailed fish in a 10 gallon tank with a 29 gallon tank that I'm planning to move them into eventually. What I want to know is, how can I cycle my 29 fast and safely? Should I leave the fish in the 10 and do a fishless cycle on the 29, and then add them once it's cycled? Or should I just add the fish and cycle the tank with them in it? I have a 400 gph hang on back filter with filter floss and ceramic media.

Thanks! :hi

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Welcome to Kokos!

Just put your filter on the new tank. It's an instant cycle since it is already built up in your 400 GPH, correct?

Edited by Mikey

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No. I didn't get a chance to cycle it in the 10. I'm freakin out because I don't want the ammonia levels to get too high :(

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Welcome to the forum. :)

Do you have test kits for ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and PH? If you move the cycled media and filter over to the twenty nine and do water changes daily, you should be ok. You want to make sure that the PH from your tap and that of your tank are pretty close, so that you don't have PH swings. Then you can monitor the other readings until the bacteria from the smaller filter seed the bigger one.

Edited by Mr.B

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hello, welcome to kokos.

if your filter is not cycled, then the more water these fish can have, the better.

yes, toxins will rise, but they will rise slower in more space and you will be able to manage them better. get yourself a testing kit, (we prefer the accuracy of the API freshwater liquid drops test kit) and Seachem Prime or Amquel Plus. these two instantly detoxify Ammonia and other harmful water params.

if you are able to go larger than a 29 gallon, say a 50 gallon food safe tub, which can even be placed on a sturdy floor, that would be one step better again. wether it be a 10, 29 or 50 gallon, you will still have to go through the same routine to establish a cycle, but at least you know that you have some room for forgiveness where it concerns toxicity.

here are the steps to cycling your tank with fish and without fish http://www.kokosgoldfish.com/cycle.html

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Thank you for your help! Definitely I will get them in the 29 asap. I wish I could do a fishless cycle, but it's probably better for them since I already have them to cycle the tank with them in it :) worrying over.

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although you are making positive steps towards the health of your fish (which is the main priority), please do remember that an uncycled environment is very dangerous for your goldies, internally and externally. so, it is really important that you do get that Ammonia test and if you can afford it, one step better is the API freshwater master kit which will give you all the basic test kits. following Ammonia, the next most harmful toxin is Nitrites. short term exposure to either high Ammonia or high Nitrites can cause severe health issues to your fish.. if they don't die from that, they can remain permanently affected or take a very long time to recover from their exposure, which during this time, can leave them vulnerable to other issues that would normally be easy for them to deal with.

I guess what I am saying is this, although I have advised you a solution to your immediate problem of dealing with fish in an uncycled environment. it is very important that for the next 4-6 weeks or however long it takes for your filter to establish a cycle, that you keep checking those water params daily and either Prime or Amquel Plus will be your best friend during this time.

PH is also important. 7.2 is borderline safe, 7 is relatively low, below 7 is really not ideal at all. goldfish prefer 7.4 to low 8's in PH.. so please keep an eye on that. buffering is easy and PH can be well managed quite easily should your water be too soft. having said that, what is most important is to maintain a stable PH at all times.

good luck and feel welcome to post back with any questions or updates as often as you like :)

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How are things going?

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Hello and Welcome to the Forum.

I hope your fish are doing okay and that you were able to purchase that API Test kit and some prime.

I would like to share something that happened to me earlier this year. I had lost my beneficial bacteria (bb) in my 55g tank and 34g tank. I had rinsed my media a little too well. :( Getting both tanks cycled with keeping my fish healthy was a lot of work. I was testing my param in the beginning twice/three times a day and doing huge water changes daily. I remember doing water changes sometimes twice a day depending on the results of my ammonia and nitrates. Having my api test kit, prime, and water changer, became my best friends. It can be done. I wish you the best and hopefully the cycling process will go by real fast. You can even post updates on your cycle if it helps you out. This way if you have any concerns or worries someone is always here. :)

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