Jump to content
dnalex

DSLR/Mirrorless Camera Settings for Optimal Fish Photography (Some Point and Shoots Cams as well)

63 posts in this topic

Aah! I really want to get a DSLR camera now! I've been trying to take pictures of my fish with a point & shoot (Just got done doing it, actually), and it seems like I need to take a couple hundred pictures to get any good ones, and they still aren't even nearly as good as that! :(:cry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Rhyan,

Thanks for your input. They are of course very much appreciated! :)

So - yes, the article on Nikon page says the truth, but it does not show all the aspects of fish photography, neither all the options you have.

Certainly. These are guides/road signs. They are meant to point you to the right way, and get you close to where you want to go. The final destination is yours. So, you will always have to mess around with the settings to find what's best for you. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me these are guided sales ways :) Nikon have exellent example of fish flash photography as part of SB700 flash product example guide.

Check it out here - http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals/Speedlights/SB-700samples.pdf

Still - it is always valid for any other camera. You have to be explorer - explore around you and you'll find your way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me these are guided sales ways :) Nikon have exellent example of fish flash photography as part of SB700 flash product example guide.

Check it out here - http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals/Speedlights/SB-700samples.pdf

Still - it is always valid for any other camera. You have to be explorer - explore around you and you'll find your way.

I don't doubt you, but the fact remains that flash can and does work, IF you have the right flash.

I don't use flash, and I have not found the need to. :)

You can argue the point that Nikon puts the article to promote DSLR camera sale, but that doesn't diminish the point in this case.

As for your point earlier, point and shoots can be quite fine for fish pictures. Of course they aren't going to be as crisp, but you will find quite a few amazing point and shoot pics on this forum. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me these are guided sales ways :) Nikon have exellent example of fish flash photography as part of SB700 flash product example guide.

Check it out here - http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals/Speedlights/SB-700samples.pdf

Still - it is always valid for any other camera. You have to be explorer - explore around you and you'll find your way.

I don't doubt you, but the fact remains that flash can and does work, IF you have the right flash.

I don't use flash, and I have not found the need to. :)

You can argue the point that Nikon puts the article to promote DSLR camera sale, but that doesn't diminish the point in this case.

As for your point earlier, point and shoots can be quite fine for fish pictures. Of course they aren't going to be as crisp, but you will find quite a few amazing point and shoot pics on this forum. :)

Hi Alex,

I agree with what you say, it is just that people have really different scale of what they accept as good quality.

Point and shoot are technically limited to be weak performers in low light conditions. They do pretty well when the light is strong, so bringing light into the tank is the key to excellent photos, no matter the camera. DSRL / Mirrorless have more options to work in low light or to bring light inside - either using flash or constant light.

What I am saying is that first people have to bring light inside the tank. Second - they have to stay away from the light in order to avoid reflections. Bringing light inside and keeping it there, not spilling outside will make wanders for any camera.

Still point & shoot will fall behind, and to me the result will be more or less a compromise.

At last - easiest way to do good photos is to invest in some high-power bulbs and use them only when you shoot fish. Bring the light in, and your camera will do wonders, no matter what is it. After all this is what photography means - drawing with light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the article makes the very same points. The professional photographer goes about addressing it in a different way, probably because he has superior equipment and access to a lot more than the average person. :)

I do agree that quality relative, and in this case, most of us are hobbyist and will content ourselves with what is within our budgets. This is also true with fish. Some have $0.20 fish, and some have $500 fish. It's all good. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These pictures really are great! I will have to play with my settings on my Nikon. Thanks for sharing! I hope to get great pix too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hello all

I'm using a dslr canon t3i(600D).

mode manual always.

if only photo of the fish, not necessary big aperture, not need focus in background.

hold camera with hand(my case), time to exposure must be little. to not shake the photo. this little time of exposure cause dark photo, but I compensate* in high ISO.

* ISO 800, for take more detail with light of tank, but take more NOISE too.

after photo usually, I edit(lightroom) .RAW file, remove some noise, and adjust dark background and more.

I use for this photos
exposure time 1/60 seconds
apperture f/5 ~ f/5.6
ISO 800
no flash

kas7r4.jpg

2rzs4yr.jpg

14dkkcg.jpg

quite photo in necessary to select some best.

Edited by PauloE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are very nice pics, Paulo. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks!

This other I made with more shutter speed 1/100 sec. and more ISO to compensate low light. ISO1600.
ISO 1600 = very noise, and very editing to reduce.

ulcw.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wanted to let you know that this post was very helpful!  I am new to goldfish, and photography.  Another member clued me into this post.  Here is a picture I took of my goldfish using the settings and lighting you recommended.  Who knew it was so easy to take gorgeous photos of our fish???

 

1xnPHFH.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

man I wish my canon powershot a590 iS took pictures like that, they always come out blurry. I've tried every setting manual, aperture priority, shutter speed priority, and every setting in between... I think it's just time for a new camera, this one doesn't perform like I need (and want) it to. It actually has all the settings except the AUTO ISO in manual. I can get everything else. It does have AUTO ISO in the Tv and Av modes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×