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Coburnn2

Tap Water Ammonia

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Hi Everyone,

I'm new to posting on Koko's, this is my second thread. My first being an emergency as my goldfish got caught in the intake tube :(

Anyway I wanted to check my water change prep with you guys .I recently moved to a new house and I now have 0.5 ppm ammonia in my tap water. (I know its a nightmare) I checked with both a test kit and I *finally* got through to the utility people, I was previously thought it was 0.25ppm so this leads me to my water question.

I use Seachem prime as my water conditioner. I would normally use 3.5ml to treat 126L of water but now as my water contains 0.5 ppm anyway I should double this dose every time I do a water change right?

Also Seachem do state that it is 5ml per 200L of 'new water' but I have always added enough Prime to treat my whole tank, do you do the same or do you just treat your new water for your water change?

Also has there ever been reports of fish having any problems relating to overdosing with Prime?

Other tap parameters just in case:

pH: 7.8

Nitrite: 0 ppm

Nitrate:0 ppm

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Prime will detoxify up to 1 ppm of ammonia so no need to double dose, unless you're still cycling. That's another story. :teehee

I treat my whole tank as I use a water changer and add the water directly to the tank. If you're using buckets you can treat each individual bucket, but treating the whole tank is easier (and probably preferred for you because of the ammonia in your tap).

You can safely double dose Prime. Personally I wouldn't go above that. If I was having water quality issues that required more than that, I would just up my water changes. :D

Hope that helps. I certainly wouldn't lose any sleep over the 0.5 ppm ammonia in your tap. A fully cycled tank will process that ammonia within 24 hours and your Prime will detoxify for that long. If you're concerned, check your ammonia level 24 hours after your next water change.

Edited by fantailfan1

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Thanks fantail1 sometimes you just need someone to confirm your thoughts or bounce ideas off :) I like to keep my ammonia levels as low as possible as my 5yr old goldfish can not tolerate ammonia at all and shows burns at even the smallest amounts. (due to previous owners housing)

Luckily my dad use to build his own aquarium tanks for showing tropical fish, unfortunately I have not learned as much from him as I should have but I do have access to old tanks when needed for QT which is good because I currently have a cycle bump in my big tank which is another reason why I wanted to check.

I do daily checks on my ammonia levels, every morning. I set them up before my shower and they are done when I get out :)

Edited by Coburnn2

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If it really worries you, set up a container (doesn't have to be a tank) big enough to hold at least the amount of water you typically change, put a filter on it with just biomedia in it (ideally with some cycled medium or gravel from your fish tank for seed). Then put your tap water in this container -- call it the aging tank-- and let it filter until the next water change. Use the water from the aging tank for your water change and refill the aging tank with tap water.

The filter in the aging tank will cycle until it is able to clean out all of the ammonia from the tap water. When you start to get nitrates in the aging tank, you can add some floating plants to use that up. One nice side effect of this is that if you ever need cycled medium that hasn't been exposed to fish (perhaps for a quarantine tank) you have it in your aging tank filter.

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Are you having ammonia in the tap, or chloramine?

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Here in Toronto, the municipal water people put ammonia into the water as the last step in the water treatment process. They have even documented this on their web site, both in text and a graphic.

I made the mistake of dosing for only chlorine using API Tap Water Conditioner, after searching for chloramine usage on the city water site, and not finding any. Sure enough the City of Toronto does not add chloramines to their water. My fish died. Going back over their site I noticed that they add both chlorine and ammonia, which combined creates chloramine. I then started dosing for chlorine and chloramine using Prime and this has helped immensely.

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Shakaho: Believe it or not that is just what my OH suggested last night. Since we bought a new external we have a spare ehiem pick up filter which could be used in our old starter tank (50L). It would mean consistently doing small water changes but it would stop me worrying about it.

Dnalex: Its chloroamine. I have been very lucky that I used Prime before I moved here.

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good idea to keep testing tap water. my ammonia in tap fluctuates. today it is 2.0ppm. last fall it was to highest reading which is 8.0 ppm. I think I will start an aging tank as suggested !!!!

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