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LoriF

blue orandas

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How do blue orandas develope as far as their color is concerned? I have read that many don't keep their color but I have seen some pretty big guys that are still that dark steele blue. Does anyone have any practicable experience with this that would wish to share?

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Blue and chocolate are dilute variations of black. Black is the most unstable of colours since we don't know of any type of foods that enrich this colour. Blue orandas that are already silvering or yellowing on the belly are most likely going to fade as the silver or yellow colour take over. There are fish with a pattern underneath a blue overtone, where the blue almost acts as a guanine cover to the scales.

Example: Bruce

nov272012005.jpg

This fish will eventually lose it's blue and that below pattern will become more evident. I presume in the pond where the algae rich/natural sunlight life will make the red/orange and yellow colours more intense on the fish.

When looking for an oranda that will keep it's overall colour you are looking for an almost matte look to the fish with deep colour saturation. The more blue on the belly the better likely the colour will stay.

Why do colours fade? Fish have tetraploidal dna meaning colour degration is on a fraction of 8. Some fish will have 1/8th of a colour and lose it fast while others will have 7/8th of a colour and keep it their whole lives. There are also envrionmental and diet reason why colours fade but when it comes to black and the dilute brown and blue, I've found that genetics play the biggest part :)

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Thanks for the information. I figured blue was a dilute of black but I didn't know that chocolate was also. My blue is silvery on the belly His back, wen and fins are more matte. The bottom of his chubby cheeks are clear. He's about 31/2 inches from nose to tail base. I guess I'll just have to wait and see. It would be nice if he kept his color because I really like it but he's really neat even if he does change color.

Edited by LoriF

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I read a very long time ago that chocolate can be determined from fry color if it lasts past two years of age. After this stage they're more likely to hold the color for longer (although how long is dependent on the individual fish's genetics as Una said) My chocolate pearlscale I've had for 4years, and was around a year when I purchased her, and still has a nice brown color to the majority of her body. She seems to be pale yellow or white underneath with no orange peeking though that I can see. Fish coloration genetics are really a mixed bag!

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Bodoba, Bruce is so handsome! I love how he's metallic silver rather than white. What interesting coloration!

The other two posters above explained this much better than I could have. :) I think color changes are fun to watch, and you'll probably get to enjoy your blue dude's blueness for a while before he changes.

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The another one that I have has a yellow wen and used to have a crispy white body. Kind of like a red cap but now he is yellowing on his fins more and a little bit on his body. It's a pretty lemon yellow. It will be fun to see the changes. My mission is to see all of these guys live to at least 20 yrs. old

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my blackmoors change colour to dark brown or a rich chocolate brown if the overhead lights are left off for 3 consecutive days. once i turn the lights back on, by the end of the day, they're pitch black again. i wonder if this is the same for the blues? although, the only difference on the exterior i notice is that the moors are velvety and not metalic scaled, this could also make a difference.

well, don't know if this info helped any, but i felt like sharing :)

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Actually it did help. I've been noticing that the telescope types seem to have more stable of black and they also seem to be that velvety black rather than metallic. I wonder if there is any correlation there as far as genetics go.

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The velvety (matte) black fish I've had have always stayed black for me. The metallics always seem to bronze out and then go orange.

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my blackmoors change colour to dark brown or a rich chocolate brown if the overhead lights are left off for 3 consecutive days. once i turn the lights back on, by the end of the day, they're pitch black again. i wonder if this is the same for the blues? although, the only difference on the exterior i notice is that the moors are velvety and not metalic scaled, this could also make a difference.

well, don't know if this info helped any, but i felt like sharing :)

Thanks for sharing!! :) I noticed the same thing with the black on my calico ryukins. Leaving the aquarium lights off for several days resulted in the black being a lighter black with a tinge of brown. The first time I thought maybe something was wrong with them but water parameters tested ok. And yup, once the light was back on the next morning their black spots were back to being a dark black. This was also matte coloring I believe.

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I read a very long time ago that chocolate can be determined from fry color if it lasts past two years of age. After this stage they're more likely to hold the color for longer (although how long is dependent on the individual fish's genetics as Una said) My chocolate pearlscale I've had for 4years, and was around a year when I purchased her, and still has a nice brown color to the majority of her body. She seems to be pale yellow or white underneath with no orange peeking though that I can see. Fish coloration genetics are really a mixed bag!

That's really interesting and cool.

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