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ema0140

7 foot tank upkeep?

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hello guys im new here :peeka its taken me ages to figure out how to post on here lol, i would really like some advice.

i am buying a used tank about 7 feet in length (soooo excited) and was wondering how i go about keeping a tank of that size clean?, will i need to changed half of the water weekly as i do now in my smaller tanks? (3ft and 2ft). any ideas or suggestions much appreciated x

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How much water you change depends on your stocking levels

Are you having substrate ? Barebottom ? Planted tank ?

Also you really should invest in a phython or something of that nature will make things a ton easier !

Here's a phython if yo don't know what they are

This is an aqueon but they do the same thing

http://www.amazon.co.uk/AQUEON-6089-Water-Changer-25ft/dp/B000YAJKL6/ref=sr_1_1?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1361304261&sr=1-1

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Bionitratex is a great product. Small bags you keep in your filter that allow the growth of very large number of nitrate eating bacteria that are not normally present in such numbers. Plus what is your water nitrate level?

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  1. What are the tank's dimensions?
  2. How many fish are you planning on keeping?
  3. What is your substrate of choice? (barebottom, sand, gravel, etc.)
  4. How heavily if at all do you plan on planting this tank?
  5. What filtration will you be using?
  6. Will you be starting fresh or do you have a current tank that is cycled you will pull media from?

Edited by ChelseaM

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Bionitratex is a great product. Small bags you keep in your filter that allow the growth of very large number of nitrate eating bacteria that are not normally present in such numbers. Plus what is your water nitrate level?

The only problem with this is that nitrate eating bacteria often do their things (nitrate eating) in conditions of fermentation and without oxygen. Most freshwater tanks usually are not accommodating to these bacteria.

Having said that, I'm going to look these up. It looks like something interesting to learn about, at the very least. :)

Ema, what is the gallonage of your tank? How many fish are you planning to have in it? It is always a good thing to change at least some amount of water weekly. This amount most of the time should be 50% or more, but it may be less, depending on your set up :)

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ok, the tank is approx 7ft x 2ftx2ft, and i plan on keeping it barebottom my idea was to add the water from the 3ft tank that is already cycled and then top it up with fresh water i also have a couple of large ornaments from the 3ft tank that i will put in too. the tank i am buying has an external filter with it but i have never used one of these before, so i know nothing about them really. the goldies that i want to put in this tank are 2 comets (5 inch and 3 inch) and three commons at about 3 inches each, i will probably add some more at a later date when tank fully cycled etc the tank i estimate to be about 200 US gallons or 700litres (i think)

Edited by ema0140

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Old water does not keep the cycle. The beneficial bacteria are in your filters. You can fill it with new water and conditioner and move your old filters over :)

If this tank is used, I work be sure to sanitize it well first and let it stand with water in it for at least a day to be sure its sturdy if it looks older. You don't want that bursting on you!

Edited by GreenTea

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ok, the tank is approx 7ft x 2ftx2ft,

This works out to be 209 gallons :)

and i plan on keeping it barebottom

Very nice!

my idea was to add the water from the 3ft tank that is already cycled and then top it up with fresh water i also have a couple of large ornaments from the 3ft tank that i will put in too. the tank i am buying has an external filter with it but i have never used one of these before, so i know nothing about them really.

You could add the old water to the tank, but it really doesn't transfer the cycle over when you do that, since beneficial bacteria are substrate bound. You will need to transfer the filter media from the old tank over, in addition to filtration that you have for your new tank.

the goldies that i want to put in this tank are 2 comets (5 inch and 3 inch) and three commons at about 3 inches each, i will probably add some more at a later date when tank fully cycled etc the tank i estimate to be about 200 US gallons or 700litres (i think)

With the current planned stocking, I think you could easily go with 25-50% WCs weekly, although as you add more, you will want to adjust this. :)

We would love to see the tank, and your fish. :)

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thanks for your help guys! :-) I'll have to figure out how to add pics lol

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How many gallons is the tank and how many fish? For a properly stocked tank (15 gallons / 60 liter per fish) tank with 10x filtration changing 50% of the water weekly is recommended.

If your tank would provide twice the amount of water for each fish (as example) you will probably be fine with changing only 25% of the water weekly. Maybe doing one full 90% water change every 6-8 weeks wouldn't hurt though, just in case.

To keep the glass clean, if your stocking level allows I would keep 1 to 3 bristlenose plecos or rubberlip (also know as rubber mouth or bulldog) pleco in the tank. They do a great job at keeping the glass spotless!

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Please pics! Most people upload to photobucket and then copy the link into the body of their message. It's so easy even I figured it out !

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How many gallons is the tank and how many fish? For a properly stocked tank (15 gallons / 60 liter per fish) tank with 10x filtration changing 50% of the water weekly is recommended.

If your tank would provide twice the amount of water for each fish (as example) you will probably be fine with changing only 25% of the water weekly. Maybe doing one full 90% water change every 6-8 weeks wouldn't hurt though, just in case.

To keep the glass clean, if your stocking level allows I would keep 1 to 3 bristlenose plecos or rubberlip (also know as rubber mouth or bulldog) pleco in the tank. They do a great job at keeping the glass spotless!

is it ok to put pleco with goldfish? i thought they would suck the slime coating off? im sure i heard that somewhere :unsure: , would be great if you could, seems like a lot of glass to clean :clapping:

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Common plecos are generally discouraged, because of exactly the problem you mentioned.

However, bristlenose plecos, rubber lips, as well as some other small and docile pleco species can do very well in a goldfish tank, provided that you give them plenty of (hiding) space, and food. Access to food with goldfish around can be a serious problem.

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Bionitratex is a great product. Small bags you keep in your filter that allow the growth of very large number of nitrate eating bacteria that are not normally present in such numbers. Plus what is your water nitrate level?

The only problem with this is that nitrate eating bacteria often do their things (nitrate eating) in conditions of fermentation and without oxygen. Most freshwater tanks usually are not accommodating to these bacteria.

Having said that, I'm going to look these up. It looks like something interesting to learn about, at the very least. :)

Ema, what is the gallonage of your tank? How many fish are you planning to have in it? It is always a good thing to change at least some amount of water weekly. This amount most of the time should be 50% or more, but it may be less, depending on your set up :)

They are a very fine pourous bag with beads in, it creates a low oxygen enviroment and the bag also contains food for the bacteria. 4 bags is enough for 200 litres at normal stocking levels. Keeps my nitrate at 0- 5ppm at all times. I packed my filter too full once and my nitrate shot up to 40ppm within a week. So I packed it less tight and gave the bags more space, my water changes took Nitrate down to 10-20ppm and within 2 days the nitrate in the tank had dropped again to 5ppm.

The bags do fill with some gas and when you squeeze it smells eggy and not pleasant at all.

I have found it an extremely good way to keep nitrate as low as possible coupled with weekly water changes.

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The large ones like common plecos are a problem because these large fish need plenty of food, more than your goldfish. But since they are much more shy than goldfish (and nocturnal) they often do not get enough nutrition when kept with goldfish, which leaves the pleco with only one food source - which is the goldfish's slime coat.

Small growing plecos are normally fine. The only time they would ever go for a goldfish is if the goldfish is very ill - but in that case that fish should be quarantined anyway because the other goldfish too may pose a threat. :)

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I had a 15" common plec kill an 8" tinfoil barb once. Found the barb stripped of scales and close to death. Could have been the barb was sick. They had been in same tank for 8 years.

And a mate at work had a massive tank with some large oscars and a 20" common plec, again one day he found two of his oscars stripped of scales.

Once they get to a certain size they can get very aggresive by all account. And the problem with the smaller plecs is reversed.

Goldfish should be kept with goldfish imho.

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Great_kahn, thank you for the additional info. It doesn't look like we have it here in the US, but I will continue to search.

We have something like this, which should work pretty well

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?pcatid=4567

But it is a tad expensive.

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Great_kahn, thank you for the additional info. It doesn't look like we have it here in the US, but I will continue to search.

We have something like this, which should work pretty well

http://www.drsfoster...cfm?pcatid=4567

But it is a tad expensive.

I did quite a product reasearch and that bionitratex was the only cheap method (£20) that was non chemical for reducing nitrates that I could find, amazed it is not more popular. Only other options are the reactors like the one you posted, or some sort of plant based filter system. Our tap water comes out at 20-30ppm, so I filter that using another cheap product http://www.shirleyaquatics.co.uk/aquarium-supplies/aquaworld-nitrate-remover/AWNR.

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what about some sort of snail then? ive heard they can do well with goldfish,(if the right type) not sure which ones though

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I'm planning on getting a newtank of about that size in a year ore so, so I'm loving this tread.

Love those little albino plecos (no idea whether those were rubbernose ore bristlenose though)

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You could do snails a lot of people here use nerite snails

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Many people here have nerites because they clean the algae. I have a purple striped apple snail simply because he/she is pretty.

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With snails, in a 7 foot tank you will need a lot of them if you want them to help keep the glass clean. I still think that the addition of one or two small growing plecos would be the best choice. They work on the algae much faster than snails, and are peaceful. :)

Miki, the albino ones you are talking about are more than likely bristlenoses. I haven't heard of albino rubberlips yet :)

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Agree that you'd need a lot of snails to keep up with your tank. 3 could only just keep on top of my 54L! Based on that i'd say about 45 snails would just keep track of your tank. Of course with larger varieties, it'd be less but not by much.

I'm inclined to agree with plecos being your best option for algae control. They're peaceful as long as they have their fair share of food. :-)

Edited by MummyDJ

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the tank I have bought comes with 2x internal and one external filters, would it be best to put the sponge from the two internals in the smaller tank I have for a week to grow bacteria before setting up new tank with filters that have no bacteria present? I'm so excited about this tank, but v nervous about cycling it, it's only the third time I've done this and this time on a much bigger scale, the first time I cycled a tank one of my fave fishies died :-(

Edited by ema0140

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