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melindapaolino

ph problems

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I'm having some problems with my ph...

I had low ph, (sorry... dont know about my kh or gh my lfs didn't have any on hand so I'm waiting for it to come in the mail) around 6.0, so the guy at my fish store gave me some rocks for the bottom of my tank that raise ph I put 4 small rocks in there and now the ph is testing bright purple!! 8.4 or 8.8 I'm so upset! lol. I took 2 small rocks out and waiting, but im worried about ph drop is that going to be an issue, or should I take all of them out and get api neutral or whatever?

I'm sorry I'm asking so many questions, I'm kind of a worry wart.

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Did you retest to make sure that it wasn't a false reading? What are the rocks called that they gave you? If it is crushed coral, that shouldn't put your pH up so high so quickly.

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I did retest using the high ph test, the purple seems brighter than the two purple options... but then again i'm not very good at colors :) haha. the low ph test gives me a bright blue that seems too bright for the last blue spot on the card which is light. I have no clue what the rock is called, but I do know its not coral.

its this

http://i1123.photobucket.com/albums/l548/ohbbyxohbby/Photoon10-19-12at1152PM_zpsb17a1a7b.jpg

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Could you get a picture of the test next to the card in bright light? Sometimes the colors look a little off when in certain lighting (: Not sure what that rock is either, but it looks like a brain :rofl

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Whatever those rocks are, I think the biggest problem is that your tap water does not appear to have much ability to stabilize the pH, e.g. the water is low in alkalinity (kH). I think the necessary solution may be that you will want to age/pH adjust your water in a separate container, and then use that water to do water changes. Your tank will also need to be buffered to keep from having pH swings.

This is what I would like for you to do, please:

1. Call your water utility and ask what the water alkalinity is.

2. Take some water and put it in a 5 gallon or so container with an airstone. Check the pH 24 hours later.

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Right now I would suggest doing a 70% water change just to get the ph down.... Can you also ask the LFS what those rocks are. Im quite curious about them :o

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Those rocks look like live rock that they use in marine aquariums.

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Those rocks look like live rock that they use in marine aquariums.

that wouldnt be good :(

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Hello fellow CT resident!

Think I'll chime in with my two cents.

First off, looks like some kind of calcareous rock that they gave you, but it was clearly too much for the tank. How big is the tank? The larger the tank, the more stable. Now while my advice for most beginners is to never add any chemicals, like pH up/down, or driftwood, peat moss, crushed coral to the tank to try to alter the pH, because a stable environment is much better than an environment that is constantly being adjusted and on the brink of collapse. But it sounds like with a pH so slow, you may need to intervene once we find out more information.

dnalex brings up a good suggestion of letting your water age, and naturally stablize. You should definitely try that method. But what I am concerned about is your water hardness. Are you going to get that tested? Because that will be the answer to if your water will be able to keep a stable pH and not have a sudden fluctuation. I have a feeling that your water may be very soft if the pH is so low right out of the tap, but there's no way to tell. So before you want to adjust the pH, you really need to know the water hardness (dH) or your aquarium's carbonate hardness (kH). These are what make up the buffer system of your water, and help maintan a stable pH. Like I said earlier, a stable environment is so much more important than constantly trying to adjust the pH.

Also, just wondering, did they use a liquid test kit? Your best bet is to buy one of your own, they are fairly cheap. I have learned to never rely on what the LFS tells you, and to do your own research and tests; although maybe yours is reputable, and I am just being cynical... :unsure:

But anyway, before adding anything to the tank, obtain a lquid test kit, find out the hardness like suggested, and start letting a bucket of water sit.

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