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njubee

not exactly a pond, but what should i call it? well - it's mine :)

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The behavior you describe is perfectly normal. If you've ever looked into a natural lake or pond you know you look for quite a while before you see fish, since they are normally just hanging in the water with little movement. Pond goldfish do much the same. They alternate between just hanging out (often together), quietly nibbling algae off some surface, and following the leader when a member of the group decides to move to another part of the pond. The more fish in the pond, the more often they "follow the leader." I think the continual back and forth swimming of aquarium fish is the equivalent of the pacing of a zoo animal.

You need a window to observe how they behave when you aren't there, but unless you have one-way glass, they will soon learn to check the window periodically when it gets close to time for you to come out and feed them. If I stand in front of the window for a while, one of them will spot me and begin a "food dance." The others start looking for me and soon they are all looking in the window, sticking their heads out with their mouths open.

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Hi there. Great pond. Looks really cool. One thing i think the fish would appreciae is some hiding places. A great way to do this is with plants that float, like water lettuce and hyacinth. These are cheap and multiply quickly. The exposed roots also do a great job of filtering impurities from the water. Many experts say it is good to have 40% of the pond covered with plants. I think the fish will love it.

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Thank you shakaho. Just what I suspected yes. So they are smart AND lazy! (we'll have to do something about that - a fitness or jogging programme. And not just a little foodparty dancing..)

So far, sadly, i am still not living there (hopefully by the end of september) so I cant check how quickly they will figure out the window :)

And thank you DieselPower. I've been thinking about that coverage yes. Was kindda hopping that the lilly would grow quicker (it always has just three or four live leaves) And one other plant with much smaller leaves, that alsoisnt growing so quickly - next year hopefully. But for hyacint i think its getting too late here probably. They do have some hiding space below the "flowerbeds" , though I was also thinkng if I should put some clay flower pots inthere for a good measure.

Thank you both again for your answers!

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Very nice! I love it! My boyfriend has ponds and takes great care of them. They look very nice and he's obsessive when it comes to making sure that the plants are perfect. xD He has koi and mosquito fish. I think I might put up some pics sometime ... He does do a VERY nice job! lol Anyways, I LOVE your pond and it looks gorgeous. I know that your fish are gonna be happy living in there.

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thank you Kiara! I would love to see some pictures (kois can be incredibly magnificient. (and sometimes even a bit scary with those huuuge and hungry mouth - at least i am (almost) sure, my goldies wont bite my finger off :)

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xD xD Sure will! And lol @ the fingers! My goldies will nibble on my fingers, but it's like they're mouthing me. The koi do the same. It doesn't hurt and they're fun to handfeed. xD

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Really beautiful and stylish. Your architect friend knows his business. You´ve done a lovely job with the planting and fish. More pictures of the whole yard when you get around to it!

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I love it. :clapping: Looks like a pond to me.

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xD xD Sure will! And lol @ the fingers! My goldies will nibble on my fingers, but it's like they're mouthing me. The koi do the same. It doesn't hurt and they're fun to handfeed. xD

hehe, yes- thats exactly what they do - nibble inquisietly. but i've seen some of the pictures of kois mouth - and these can grow huuuuge :o

Really beautiful and stylish. Your architect friend knows his business. You´ve done a lovely job with the planting and fish. More pictures of the whole yard when you get around to it!

Thank you (and i am sure my friend will be happy to hear that aswell :) .. hopefully in a couple of months a whole yard will get some nicer "whole picture" ..

I love it. :clapping: Looks like a pond to me.

Thank you! (it looks a bit like a bathtub to me sometimes :)

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Great work, it looks beautiful, really nice fish too!!!

Just keep an eye on the white spots, any change in color after adding a fish to a new environment is probably not a good thing, but they are probably fine!

Congrats on the pond!

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Thanks :) ... I try to look out for any changes (not just white spots) - but that turned out much harder in a pond than in aquarium .. Whole different perspective ...

...

eeeeh... i did something stupid today. but couldn't help myself .... they felt soooo lonely (and dont blame me, of course, i didn't have any say at it!)

..i only realised how small they were after seeing them near others. they looked so big in aquarium. ...i hope it works out for them - i know its a terrible thing to say, but....

http://s1064.photobucket.com/albums/u380/njubee/newfish/?start=all

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this is one of the nicest setups goldfish ponds i've seen, it just looks so well thought out.

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Thank you Squared! luckily for me most of the thinking out part wasn't done by me) (otherwise i would still be standing knee deep in mud feeling sorry for myself :)

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That is a beautiful pond design. Are the wood on the plant box waterproofed or treated to last long?

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That is a beautiful pond design. Are the wood on the plant box waterproofed or treated to last long?

Thanks. No, the wood is completely untreated (or so I understood) - and I just hope that my carpenter was right about that :)

..

Sorry for the bad video. I just couldnt help myself... The little one is so cute, that a part of me doesn't want him to grow. ever! ... AND, even though its getting colder and colder - I think he is in heat! (he is bothering/seducing the big fish - now how manly is that!?)

Hope this link thingie works:

http://s1064.photobucket.com/albums/u380/njubee/videjo/?action=view&current=ecf70f70.mp4

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I hate being negative, but I'm getting increasingly concerned about all the gravel in your pond. Unless there is water actively running through it, gravel accumulates organic material that fills in the spaces between the stones and rots. The gravel bed becomes anaerobic and supports the growth of anaerobic bacteria. Some of these release toxic gases that can kill fish. Even a layer of gravel an inch or two deep on the bottom of a pond can become a source of toxins. Those huge planters full of gravel are a ticking time bomb.

You don't have to panic. It usually takes about two years for gravel bottomed ponds to become toxic. While a big underwater bin of gravel is more dangerous than a layer of gravel in the bottom, your fish are still small, and you don't have a lot of them. Thus the waste accumulation is not that great. Putting plants in a pot of gravel that has water moving around it is safe. The bin of water that has water flowing into it is probably safe, but I'm worried about the others.

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hey shakaho! thank you for your concern! and, though its not popular - i like to hear the negative thoughts.

i was (ok - still am) a bit worried about the gravel at the bottom. thats why only half of bottom is covered - i still haven't decided if i want to go "clean bottomed" or gravelled. I heard/read lots of negative things about that kind of bottom. (of course, after a couple of showels were already in... but jut the other day i saw a video of a pond that has been running for 6 years with gravel in the shelves, and everything looked ok (and the gravel wasnt even that dirty) .. but ... i'll see next year...

as for the underwater-flower-bed ... now you got me concerned about that aswell ... i thought that if it has plants in it that the (ammonia? and other nasty deadly stuff) wouldnt be a problem. hmmmm.... dont know, dont know .... do you think it helps in anyway that the bin is not "waterproof" - its same as the "filter" made of cca 5cm slats with cca 1cm gaps .. (but, of course, water is not actively pushed through it ...

hmhmhmmm . yup. NOW i am worried about that aswell (have to start keeping a list of all the things to worry - otherwise i might forget and stop worrying :)

thanks again for the "headsup"!

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I have done bare bottom and rock bottom and I like bare bottom much better. Believe me when I tell you that although the rocks and stones do no appear very dirty they could still be filthy. I replaced a 225 gallon performed pond a while ago and the rocks were filled with garbage and smelled terrible! The bare bottom would make it much easier to prevent the buildup.

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Thanks for sharing DieselPlower! I love to get some thought from real experience (not just some copy-paste from someone that somewhere once wrote (or probably copypasted from somewhere else)) .... I am strongly inclining to clean up the bottom in the spring (although i dont know how long it will stay rock-free .. my goldies love sucking on smaller gravel, playing with it and throwing it around. But never clean up after the playtime is over - i think i'll have discipline them more!

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Gravel that they take in their mouths can get stuck, which is not pleasant at all. You should limit gravel available to the fish to pieces too large for them to take in their mouths or small enough to swallow easily.

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Really shakaho? Auch :( ... Does that happen often? Or is it more in the "it can in some crazy circumstances" happen category? I never thought of that - thinking, hey, its rock, fish know they are not suppose to swallow that... :( ... I was mainly afraid of the birch seeds (well, not the seeds exactly, I don't kow what they are - they are like threesided stars with sharp points) that are constantly falling in the pond from neighbours birch and they love taking that in the mouth (and spiting it out as its inedible) ...

EH! So i'll have to tend this gravel problem fast... whew - it seems nothing good ever comes from gravel! (i wish i would have gone with pillow padded "insane asylum" pond)

Thanks shakaho for the warning!

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EH! So i'll have to tend this gravel problem fast... whew - it seems nothing good ever comes from gravel! (i wish i would have gone with pillow padded "insane asylum" pond)

I'm sorry that your having troubles, but that is friggin funny. :lol Good luck with everything. :)

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Really shakaho? Auch :( ... Does that happen often? Or is it more in the "it can in some crazy circumstances" happen category?

It's not uncommon. In fact, it's one of the major reasons people who hated bare bottom tanks decide to take out their gravel. Usually the gravel can be dislodged without serious damage to the fish, but it's not a fun process. The problem is that fish grow, so the safe size of gravel keeps changing. The fish normally pick up stones, roll them around in their mouths to get off the algae and then spit them out. But sometimes it doesn't work.

I use pea gravel in pots in the pond, but I cover the top with a layer of large stones so the fishies don't even know the lovely gravel is in there.

Here's what I would do with your pond. You have already said you realize you will need more filtration. I suggest you build a bog filter along the fence. A bog filter is a lined pond with a surface area about 20% of the pond, 33-40 cm deep, and at least 15 cm higher than the water level of the pond. You pump water from the pond to a "holey pipe" going across the bottom of the bog. The bog is filled with ---- gravel!! You have plants growing in the top of the bog. (They grow much better there than in pots in the water.) The water from the pond percolates up through the gravel which provides both mechanical and bio filtration. The plants soak up nitrates and other nutrients. Then the clean water spills back into the pond.

Here is the best source on bog filters. While they describe building a partition bog, what you want is a raised bog. Here is the bog filter I built. If I were doing it over again, I would make the bog about 10cm higher than it is (It's only about 5 cm higher than the pond water) and make a spillway that produced a waterfall. The guy who made the pond could certainly create a matching frame for the bog.

The bog filter not only provides superior filtration and a beautiful garden, it also puts all that gravel to good use. You could still use one of those in-pond plant stands for water lilies. If the one you have is on the bottom, that may be why it's not doing so well.

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Gorgeous! Keep us posted on your population. I'd love to have a big enough tank for sarasas. I love their coloring!

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I'm sorry that your having troubles, but that is friggin funny. :lol Good luck with everything. :)

Thanks for the goodluck - it seems i'll need it :) ... So far -knockonwood- luck has mostly been with me (and most gravel problem only theoretical (hope they stay that way) :)

It's not uncommon. In fact, it's one of the major reasons people who hated bare bottom tanks decide to take out their gravel. Usually the gravel can be dislodged without serious damage to the fish, but it's not a fun process. The problem is that fish grow, so the safe size of gravel keeps changing. The fish normally pick up stones, roll them around in their mouths to get off the algae and then spit them out. But sometimes it doesn't work.

I use pea gravel in pots in the pond, but I cover the top with a layer of large stones so the fishies don't even know the lovely gravel is in there.

Here's what I would do with your pond. You have already said you realize you will need more filtration. I suggest you build a bog filter along the fence. A bog filter is a lined pond with a surface area about 20% of the pond, 33-40 cm deep, and at least 15 cm higher than the water level of the pond. You pump water from the pond to a "holey pipe" going across the bottom of the bog. The bog is filled with ---- gravel!! You have plants growing in the top of the bog. (They grow much better there than in pots in the water.) The water from the pond percolates up through the gravel which provides both mechanical and bio filtration. The plants soak up nitrates and other nutrients. Then the clean water spills back into the pond.

Here is the best source on bog filters. While they describe building a partition bog, what you want is a raised bog. Here is the bog filter I built. If I were doing it over again, I would make the bog about 10cm higher than it is (It's only about 5 cm higher than the pond water) and make a spillway that produced a waterfall. The guy who made the pond could certainly create a matching frame for the bog.

The bog filter not only provides superior filtration and a beautiful garden, it also puts all that gravel to good use. You could still use one of those in-pond plant stands for water lilies. If the one you have is on the bottom, that may be why it's not doing so well.

I was thinking of a bog filter like that aswell, if this existing experimental filter wouldnt work. So probably that will also be a next year project. I think it could quite easily be integrated in the existing "design" and - even more plants to hide that awful fence :)

At first I only wanted to go with large 4cm and bigger river gravel - but then I thought that plants wouldnt grow through that kind of gravel - so i put a finer gravel around the plants.. ehwell..

(why do you think that the lily is having problems because of the depth? (i am thinking it maybe doesnt have enough nutritions. (or that its gravel is to big :)

WAU - beautiful filter and pond work you have there! (i remember already looking at it before i signed up to kokos and remember thinking, well -exactly that- WAU! ... I wish I were that handy (so - how much for flying you over to do my filter? I promise i will stay out of the way :)

So winter will be for thinking and planing aswell ... I already hate that the autumn is coming and I wont be able to feed them ...

Thanks again for your insight and help!!

Gorgeous! Keep us posted on your population. I'd love to have a big enough tank for sarasas. I love their coloring!

Thank you! I love sarasas aswell - but are kindda hard to get here (maybe will be easyer in springtime), and the one that i got disappeared :( and a calico fantail that i got together with sarasa also. (i like to think that they eloped and got married secretly and are now travelling the world..)

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