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erictruong

Recommended air pump for 75 gallon aquarium?

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I'm looking for a strong enough air pump for my 75 gallon goldfish tank to push out bubbles from a bubble wall. I have a bubble wall in my 20 gallon tank but my pump that is specified for a 20 gallon tank does not have enough strength to force bubbles out of all the holes. I need one that will distribute the air in the wall evenly. Anyone have suggestions? :o

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I used a "10 gallon" air pump for my 55 for a long time... and it worked fine! I used a tetra whisper pump.

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I also used an underrated AC pump for my 55, and I had a bubble wand. It worked fine.

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The problem could be either a broken pump diaphram, a clogged wand, the air simply taking the path of least resistance... Or some other possibility with unintentional innuendo. Lol. Maybe it's as you say- just a weak pump... Bazinga!!

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Or maybe its because my tubing is too long and it has to travel a longer distance to get to the wand therefore not enough power. I'll try cutting down the length of it and see if it helps and

@ Call & river, does it affect your aeration of water in anyway? I mean how do i know my air pump is creating enough oxygen for my fish?

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I have read many times that its all about surface agitation. That gas exchange occurs at the surface of the water- and is less dependent on how many bubbles you pump through. In this way a strong output from a filter that splashes or disturbs the surface tension should do most of what you are after.

Think about it- the water will only hold so much oxygen. So pumping more bubbles through the water isnt the issue so much as helping it "pass" or "exchange".

Maybe the best way to ensure more complete voiding of co2 is by setting up your air stone wherever the water tends to move slowest in your tank.

Also, warm water (which expands) allows for less oxygen. So other factors notwithstanding, shoot for the coolest temp you can run. Live plants will also help by both absorbing CO2 and producing O2.

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I have one Walmart Aquatech airpump, the largest one, for half of my 180. I love it! And it was super cheap.

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You should also be running check valves on your air pumps to keep water from filling up and possibly leaking out of your pump in the event of a power outage.

However ive noticed that different check valves have different resistances. They arent rated so the easy test is to get a couple and blow through them. Ive also seen them deform from heat if mounted too close to the air pump (1-2" from the pump outlet)

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As for your question regarding how much air is enough- if they are gasping at the surface you need to either increase your gas exchange rates (doubtful with even no aeration so long as your filter output is good enough to circulate the water particularly near the surface) or cut back on feeding or sell some fish or do a water change. The gasping is symptomatic of decreased O2 levels in the tank due to too much ammonia or its byproduct nitrite.

In other words, you dont need a better air pump unless you want one for the visual effect. I have noticed that my fish seem more jumpy when its on. I wondered at first if it indicated more robust health, but the more consistantly sedate fish whom remained calm with or without the air pump on, showed no difference in gill respiratory movements. In fact, with it on, i noticed most fish seemed to be gill pumping more rapidly which i took as further sign of excitation.

However some fish enjoy swimming through or hanging out in the bubbles. Plecos are known for this behavior on occasion, and they actually get their air in one or two big gasps above the surface as opposed to from "breathing" the water.

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I was just wondering about using an under-rated air pump and if I even needed one since I have 2 filters running 325gph on my 20g tank. Doesn't look like I need one but I will hold on to my whisper 20 instead of returning it in case I need it when I upgrade the tank size. Thanks

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Or maybe its because my tubing is too long and it has to travel a longer distance to get to the wand therefore not enough power. I'll try cutting down the length of it and see if it helps and

@ Call & river, does it affect your aeration of water in anyway? I mean how do i know my air pump is creating enough oxygen for my fish?

It's not something I measure, but everything seems fine. I had a nice stream of bubbles constantly, and the surface was disturbed. I also use the bubbles to help move the water, and I definitely had enough bubble for that. When I used that pump in my 36, I was able to get two good streams from it.

I just got a new air pump because I wanted one with a double outlet for my new 77. Based on the performance of the other pumps, I got one rated for a 55. It's working great.

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When I had my 80 gallon tank, I had a bubble wand running along the length of the tank wall. The only air pump I found to run it was the Tetra Deep Air pumps. It was pretty darn strong :)

http://www.petco.com/product/116152/Tetra-Whisper-Deep-Water-Air-Pump.aspx

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@ Call & river, does it affect your aeration of water in anyway? I mean how do i know my air pump is creating enough oxygen for my fish?

I'm sure all the bubbles help with aeration because my filter doesn't disturb the water that much since I added a baffle to reduce the current. The air pump broke down (it was a 10 year old pump) so the fish haven't had bubbles in the tank for a few months, but they seem fine. It's been in the mid 90s for a few weeks now and they never gasp at the surface or show signs of distress. In fact, they seem a lot more active than in the winter when it's in the low 60s. That said I do have a lot of plants (and algae, unfortunately) in the tank to oxygenate the water

I have read many times that its all about surface agitation. That gas exchange occurs at the surface of the water- and is less dependent on how many bubbles you pump through. In this way a strong output from a filter that splashes or disturbs the surface tension should do most of what you are after.

By surface agitation, it doesn't mean the top of the water but the surface of where air and water meet. The surface of a bubble counts. A fine mist of bubbles will be most effective in aerating the water since the smaller the volume of each bubble, the greater the ratio of surface area. The effectiveness of bubbles in diffusing gas is like the alveoli in the lungs- instead of a flat surface, many small "bubbles" are used to increase surface area for gas exchange between the atmosphere and bloodstream.

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Good point- and analogy. Thank you:)

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Okay so I purchased an air pump rated for a 40 gallon tank. Surprisingly it was really cheap only around 16$ Hope it will work out well haha Thanks everyone! Now i gotta post another topic about my filter @__@

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