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dnalex

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Everything posted by dnalex

  1. I know that the forum has a wealth of information of great foods for goldfish, including gel foods. However, I would like to collate some of the info, specifically on gel food that has been tested and verified to work for confirmed floaters. Please share your recipes here I'll start. This is my latest recipe, and I am 100% pleased with it. I've had other recipes that work, but this one by far is the best, simply because I think it gives good nutrition, awesome food consistency, and not even a hint of floatiness, at least for my fish Alex's No-Float Yummy Agar Gel Recipe: - 6 oz canned or bagged tuna (low sodium is best). Substitute: steamed fresh fish (weigh before steaming). - 2 jars (8 oz) Gerbers baby food. I've used peas, carrots, and mixed vegetables. Substitute: 4 oz veggies cooked and then puree with 1/2 cup spring or distilled water. (Do not use broccoli [gas] or spinach [interferes with calcium absorption in same food]) - boil two eggs and use only the egg whites - blend this together until you get a nice thick pur?e consistency. - 4 teaspoons of highly quality food like Pro-Gold - 1 multivitamin - 1 probiotic tablet - 1/2 teaspoon garlic - 1/2 teaspoon koi clay - crush pellets etc. to a powder, and mix together. - in a pot with lid, add 2-3 tablespoons of agar to 1.5 cups distilled spring/distilled water and turn heat on high - add the fish eggs mixture and stir slowly but well - cover with lid and let mixture come to a boil - once boiling, occasionally lift lid to stir mixture, and let boil for about 3 minutes. - remove from heat - in about 5-10 minutes, when mixture has not yet congealed and is warm but touchable, add powder mixture and stir slowly but well Pour into baking pan. Leave at room temp for 1 hour. By this time you should see a very well gelled product. Cover with Saran wrap and refrigerate for 3-4 hours. Then, cut into 1 inch cubes and freeze. Thaw before using. Thaw enough to feed only for 2-3 days max. For maintenance, feed 1% body weight daily once or several times a day. For growth, 2% - 3% divided into 3-6 meals/day. Note on agar: I use 3 teaspoons for my recipe. The texture is relatively hard and the fish will have to chew a bit more. I do this intentionally so that the hogs don't inhale everything. To make it softer, use 2 tablespoons. You must make sure to cook the agar as shown above to ensure melting of agar and binding of the mixture Click here to view the article
  2. Greetings fellow Kokonuts, Recently, I noticed that there has been a lot of arguing in the D&D thread, with not much moving forward as the result of such arguments. What DID happen was that we would then get pages to slog through, which can be very frustrating, not to mention unhelpful. I would like to remind everyone of the following: - please respect it when mods/helpers/senior members are helping in the thread. They are helping to coordinate things. Please do NOT make medication recommendations before getting all information, and it's best to wait for someone from the mod team. If help is not coming fast enough, use the report button, and admin will make sure it gets answered ASAP. - once someone has asked for vital information, let's not inundate the OP with the same requests multiple times. It can be annoying at best and very off-putting at worst. Remember that we want to help, not to make everything look so daunting/intimidating that people just give up before they start. - D&D threads are NOT places to argue about things. - D&D threads really should be kept as trim and concise as possible, so that the OP and those helping can actually quickly read through it. Well wishes are of course welcome, and encouraged. Thank you for your help, and attention, to this matter. I hope your summer/winters are all going splendidly!
  3. Waterfaller1 (Carole) had made a request to have a thread where everyone's tanks is in one thread. I thought this is a great idea. So, I'll start. Please add your pics of your tank(s) here so we can show off what a bunch of beautiful and varied tanks forum members have I chose the planted tank section because I think most of us have some live plants. Here are mine. 100g 55g themed tank Old 55g Planted tank
  4. Hello, It's been a really long time since I made a KGW poll, and I thought I would (re)start by making a lighthearted one that also can be really informative about the browsing habits of KGW members. Feel free to comment
  5. Hello everyone! Thank you for the kind words. Bolt is a spoiled brat! Actually, puppies antics aside, he's a very good puppy and learns extremely quickly. And he passed the Dash test, whatever that was. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  6. I'll just put this here and bolt... Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  7. Dog training, what methods/style/rewards do you use?

    I beg and I plea, and then I do it again. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  8. I've never said hello

    Hello, it's me. I was wondering if you'd like to talk. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. This salty story! :)

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/stephaniemcneal/fish-eye?bffbmain&utm_term=4ldqpgp#4ldqpgp Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  10. I'm dating a woman who has this...!

    They don't know what to do with all that space. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  11. MIA again...... But for a different reason

    Gorgeous! I don't know how you handle two puppies at one time. I have one currently, and he is a handful lol Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  12. Panda Oranda Hybrid

    It's a gorgeous fish, but a hybrid of what? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  13. http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160621/12dc5c51e67a8b0b868610a332fd940b.jpg Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  14. Dash has RBF Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  15. Thank you everyone, and thank you, Daniel, for the punnilicious words lol Here's a pic of the terrible two! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  16. I. Introduction Breeding tubercles are small whitish nodular structures often found on male goldfish, and many other types of fish, spanning across at least 15 different families, and 4 orders. While some of these nodules are a constant presence on male goldfish, others appear preceding spawning, and disappear shortly after. Breeding tubercles, sometimes also called breeding stars, are found mainly on male goldfish, although in some rare instances can be found on females. Because breeding stars are usually found predominantly on males, these structures are fairly reliable markers for gender identification. There are two places where breeding tubercles are frequently found. First, they can be found on the front rays of the pectoral fins. Once the pectoral fins have developed (prior to sexual maturity), these structures remain in place for the duration of the fish's life. Pectoral stars can diminish in size after spawning, but will grow even larger during the next season. Breeding stars/tubercles on the pectoral fins of male goldfish Breeding stars are also often found on the gill opercula/covers of goldfish. Unlike the pectoral tubercles, these stars usually disappear after a season's spawning, and reappear in the next season. Breeding stars/tubercles on the gill plates of male goldfish Breeding stars/tubercles on both gill plates and pectoral fins of male goldfish In some instances, breeding tubercles can be found distributed throughout the entire body of the goldfish. II. Regulation & Function of Breeding Tubercles Breeding tubercles are essentially overgrown skin cells covered by a cap of keratin. These structures are formed in response to hormones such as testosterone from the gonads and other hormones from the pituitary glands. Stimulated cells begin to divide much faster than normal. These epidermal cells are also somehow reprogrammed to switch from mucus production to that of keratin, resulting in the keratin cap. Vascular networks are also induced and put in place, to support the long term survival of these structures (see figure below). Experimental studies have shown that injection of testosterone in both male and female fish are sufficient to induce the formation of breeding stars, although the process is much more easily done in males than in females, demonstrating that there are other male hormones/factors at work to enhance the process. These studies also suggest a way whereby sometimes female goldfish might acquire breeding tubercles, such as the overproduction of a particular hormone. (figure taken from Wiley & Collette) So, do these tubercles have any functions? While not much definitive work have been shown, a number of functions have been inferred, or suggested: - sexual display - to differentiate between male and females. - tactile stimulation of females during spawning - defense of territories and nests. It's been suggested that these hardened structures could be brandished as weapons of sorts. - dominance display among males - indicator of health (males free from parasitism will display more stars, while disease ridden ones may have few or none) It's important to note that in different species of tubercle bearing fish, the function(s) may vary. In goldfish, it's not clear what roles the breeding stars play in the spawning process, although territorial defense and usage as weapons are not likely. III. Conclusions While not much is known about the function of breeding tubercles, these contact organs are very useful in sex determination in goldfish, as they predominantly appear in males. IV. References 1. Wiley, ML & Collette, BB. 1970. Breeding tubercles and contact organs in fishes: their occurrence, structure, and significance. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 143:147. 2. Kortet, R. et al. 2004. Breeding tubercles, papillomatosis and dominance behaviour of male roach (Rutilus rutilus) during the spawning period. Ethology 110:591. 3. Ghadially, FN & Whiteley, HJ. 1952. Hormonally induced epithelial hyperplasia in the goldfish (Carrasius auratus). Br J Cancer 6:246. Click here to view the article
  17. I. Introduction Breeding tubercles are small whitish nodular structures often found on male goldfish, and many other types of fish, spanning across at least 15 different families, and 4 orders. While some of these nodules are a constant presence on male goldfish, others appear preceding spawning, and disappear shortly after. Breeding tubercles, sometimes also called breeding stars, are found mainly on male goldfish, although in some rare instances can be found on females. Because breeding stars are usually found predominantly on males, these structures are fairly reliable markers for gender identification. There are two places where breeding tubercles are frequently found. First, they can be found on the front rays of the pectoral fins. Once the pectoral fins have developed (prior to sexual maturity), these structures remain in place for the duration of the fish's life. Pectoral stars can diminish in size after spawning, but will grow even larger during the next season. Breeding stars/tubercles on the pectoral fins of male goldfish Breeding stars are also often found on the gill opercula/covers of goldfish. Unlike the pectoral tubercles, these stars usually disappear after a season's spawning, and reappear in the next season. Breeding stars/tubercles on the gill plates of male goldfish Breeding stars/tubercles on both gill plates and pectoral fins of male goldfish In some instances, breeding tubercles can be found distributed throughout the entire body of the goldfish. II. Regulation & Function of Breeding Tubercles Breeding tubercles are essentially overgrown skin cells covered by a cap of keratin. These structures are formed in response to hormones such as testosterone from the gonads and other hormones from the pituitary glands. Stimulated cells begin to divide much faster than normal. These epidermal cells are also somehow reprogrammed to switch from mucus production to that of keratin, resulting in the keratin cap. Vascular networks are also induced and put in place, to support the long term survival of these structures (see figure below). Experimental studies have shown that injection of testosterone in both male and female fish are sufficient to induce the formation of breeding stars, although the process is much more easily done in males than in females, demonstrating that there are other male hormones/factors at work to enhance the process. These studies also suggest a way whereby sometimes female goldfish might acquire breeding tubercles, such as the overproduction of a particular hormone. (figure taken from Wiley & Collette) So, do these tubercles have any functions? While not much definitive work have been shown, a number of functions have been inferred, or suggested: - sexual display - to differentiate between male and females. - tactile stimulation of females during spawning - defense of territories and nests. It's been suggested that these hardened structures could be brandished as weapons of sorts. - dominance display among males - indicator of health (males free from parasitism will display more stars, while disease ridden ones may have few or none) It's important to note that in different species of tubercle bearing fish, the function(s) may vary. In goldfish, it's not clear what roles the breeding stars play in the spawning process, although territorial defense and usage as weapons are not likely. III. Conclusions While not much is known about the function of breeding tubercles, these contact organs are very useful in sex determination in goldfish, as they predominantly appear in males. IV. References 1. Wiley, ML & Collette, BB. 1970. Breeding tubercles and contact organs in fishes: their occurrence, structure, and significance. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 143:147. 2. Kortet, R. et al. 2004. Breeding tubercles, papillomatosis and dominance behaviour of male roach (Rutilus rutilus) during the spawning period. Ethology 110:591. 3. Ghadially, FN & Whiteley, HJ. 1952. Hormonally induced epithelial hyperplasia in the goldfish (Carrasius auratus). Br J Cancer 6:246.
  18. I'm sure one of the helpful people will be around soon, but: I would stop any more medicating. I think you've tried the lot. I also would cease with the freeze dried food. Until help arrives, hang tight and good luck! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  19. It's Tapatalk's fault! When I switched to the web view, I could see it. I fully endorse using Epsom-laced feed as a way to treat intestinal parasites. I never cared for the amount we used in the water anyway. It's way too low to be effective. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  20. Sharon, It looks like you have to be a member to view the thread from that forum... Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  21. I'm dating a woman who has this...!

    Dog with goggle... Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  22. I'm dating a woman who has this...!

    I'm not that concerned about the acclimating. Consider the current situation them being in shipping water. If there is a change, acclimate as per current acclimation protocol for receiving new fish. Btw, my suggestion of temporarily doing nothing is predicated on the supposition that the good woman will make a decision regarding the fish in the next couple of days haha Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  23. I'm dating a woman who has this...!

    And now here comes the potentially very controversial suggestion If it were me, I would hold off on doing anything just yet. It seems to me that things are at an equilibrium. The tank has a lot of the nitrogen products, but the pH is also pretty low, which protects them from damage. Functionally, it seems to be the case. I have not of observations of darting fish or ammonia burns, etc. I would see what she decides about the fish. If she does make a commitment to keeping them, then implement the changes. I say this because they are currently in a state of equilibrium. If you start tinkering with it, you will want to bring it to a satisfactory end, whatever that may be. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  24. I'm dating a woman who has this...!

    Taryl, RO water is not buffered, so it will not be able to affect the pH. That is why Sharon suggested it. In any scheme where you want to disturb the pH the least, change slowly, and use RO, because then you are influencing the pH changes the least. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  25. I'm dating a woman who has this...!

    Jason, I think you are going about it absolutely the right way. And I am totally happy that you are dating someone who sounds overall pretty excellent. Good luck with everything, and keep us updated. ______________ Myra, being a part of any community doesn't mean that we agree with everything everyone says or does. I am sure admin appreciates having you here, as does everyone. On the other hand, my mortal enemies are Jared and Lisa S. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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