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Drowsy

1.0 Ammonia in tap water.

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I just did a test of my houses tap water, and I was aghast to see it come out at 1.0ppm just straight from the tap. I actually can't tell if it's close to 2.0 or not.

I used the API drop test kit to test it.

Holygod.

Are there any water conditioners to pour into it to get rid of this? I used Aquasafe right now when I do water changes and it doesn't remove the ammonia as far as I can tell.

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No water conditioner removes ammonia. However, there are a few that detoxify ammonia by temporarily converting it into a non-toxic form that is still consumable by cycle bacteria. These products include Seachem Prime & Kordon Amquel+. There are several members here who have ammonia in the tap, and double dosing or triple dosing with Prime carries them over the next several days after WC. Eventually, your cycle bacteria should grow bigger and be able to accommodate the tap ammonia. It shouldn't take long. In the mean, time, you just use Prime as needed until everything settles :)

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Terta offers a product called "Ammonia safe" and it can be found at most petstores. The only thing about it is the chemicals in these products alter the ammonia and in large doses can lower oxygen levels in the tank so you need to make sure you have decent aeration if you're planning on using it long term.

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No water conditioner removes ammonia. However, there are a few that detoxify ammonia by temporarily converting it into a non-toxic form that is still consumable by cycle bacteria. These products include Seachem Prime & Kordon Amquel+. There are several members here who have ammonia in the tap, and double dosing or triple dosing with Prime carries them over the next several days after WC. Eventually, your cycle bacteria should grow bigger and be able to accommodate the tap ammonia. It shouldn't take long. In the mean, time, you just use Prime as needed until everything settles :)

Ah, good!

The bacteria in my QT tank does not seem strong enough to consume the ammonia right now. I'm going to the pet store tomorrow to look at what products they have. I am, unfortunately, going to have to put FiFi into an unsalted tank until then because I saw her gasping at the surface even with the filter and a bubble wand going. The 100% changes just bring in too much ammonia I think.

Blah, what a setback.

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Terta offers a product called "Ammonia safe" and it can be found at most petstores. The only thing about it is the chemicals in these products alter the ammonia and in large doses can lower oxygen levels in the tank so you need to make sure you have decent aeration if you're planning on using it long term.

This works on similar principles as Prime and Amquel+. I don't have much experience with AmmoniaSafe, but tons of people have had experience with Prime and Amquel+. The benefits of Prime is that it also removes chlorine and chloramine, as well as detoxifying nitrite and nitrates. It's also ridiculously cheap compared to other products. So, I would definitely recommend Prime over most other products, if not all :)

I've also mentioned before that ALL water conditioners that remove chlorines and chloramines, as well as remove ammonia etc. are reducers, and as such they remove oxygen from the water. Hence, usage of any of these products should be within recommended guidelines. For Prime, that's up to 5X in emergencies, and 1/2X when water temps are in the 80s or higher. As PSP indicated, having well-aerated water will help.

Drowsy, as for Fifi, what we can do is to give her a salt dip (use ammonia free water), and then place her back in unsalted water. What is your tap pH, btw?

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^Yea I've never used ammoniasafe before but I've never had to haha, I use aquasafe+ as a waterconditioner and I've had no problems. Also I was posting as you posted and didn't see you had :x

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Terta offers a product called "Ammonia safe" and it can be found at most petstores. The only thing about it is the chemicals in these products alter the ammonia and in large doses can lower oxygen levels in the tank so you need to make sure you have decent aeration if you're planning on using it long term.

This works on similar principles as Prime and Amquel+. I don't have much experience with AmmoniaSafe, but tons of people have had experience with Prime and Amquel+. The benefits of Prime is that it also removes chlorine and chloramine, as well as detoxifying nitrite and nitrates. It's also ridiculously cheap compared to other products. So, I would definitely recommend Prime over most other products, if not all :)

I've also mentioned before that ALL water conditioners that remove chlorines and chloramines, as well as remove ammonia etc. are reducers, and as such they remove oxygen from the water. Hence, usage of any of these products should be within recommended guidelines. For Prime, that's up to 5X in emergencies, and 1/2X when water temps are in the 80s or higher. As PSP indicated, having well-aerated water will help.

Drowsy, as for Fifi, what we can do is to give her a salt dip (use ammonia free water), and then place her back in unsalted water. What is your tap pH, btw?

Tap pH is 7.5. It stays steady like that from the tap and in my tanks from what I see.

Tell me more about salt dips?

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I have 1ppm Ammonia in my tap water, and my cycle does take care of it in less than a day. The Prime will detoxify the ammonia in your tank for 24 hours, so if you're doing large daily water changes, just treat the water with Prime and and you should be good. So I second the recommendation for Prime. It's saved my butt from my horrible tap water on more than one occasion. :)

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Tap pH is 7.5. It stays steady like that from the tap and in my tanks from what I see.

Tell me more about salt dips?

That pH is fantastic, and is a huge saving grace in this situation. As you may know, ammonia can either exist as free (toxic) ammonia, or as bound (non-toxic ammonium). Two factors that influence the balance between these two are temperature and pH. At pH 7.5, most (more than 99% I believe) of the ammonia is in the non-toxic ammonium form, so your fish is largely affected from the acute effects of ammonia poisoning. However, Prime should still be used, because the little bit of toxicity leftover is still bad and can contribute to chronic issues.

For salt dips, you make a solution of aquarium salt that is 3%, or about sea concentration of salt, and add fish to the water. The maximum the fish can stay in there is 5 minutes, and if before that, he starts to tilt to the side and cannot get back up, you remove him/her right away. The benefit of the salt dip is that it strips the slime coat of the fish, taking with it on that was on there. Salt at this concentration also is antimicrobial, basically by dehydrating the bacterial cells etc.

To make 3% salt solution, you dissolve 30 teaspoons salt per gallon of water. Make sure that the salt is dissolved and the temp and pH of the dip match that of the main tank. Make sure that the water does not contain ammonia, so don't use tap, and do use dechlorinator. :)

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Tap pH is 7.5. It stays steady like that from the tap and in my tanks from what I see.

Tell me more about salt dips?

That pH is fantastic, and is a huge saving grace in this situation. As you may know, ammonia can either exist as free (toxic) ammonia, or as bound (non-toxic ammonium). Two factors that influence the balance between these two are temperature and pH. At pH 7.5, most (more than 99% I believe) of the ammonia is in the non-toxic ammonium form, so your fish is largely affected from the acute effects of ammonia poisoning. However, Prime should still be used, because the little bit of toxicity leftover is still bad and can contribute to chronic issues.

For salt dips, you make a solution of aquarium salt that is 3%, or about sea concentration of salt, and add fish to the water. The maximum the fish can stay in there is 5 minutes, and if before that, he starts to tilt to the side and cannot get back up, you remove him/her right away. The benefit of the salt dip is that it strips the slime coat of the fish, taking with it on that was on there. Salt at this concentration also is antimicrobial, basically by dehydrating the bacterial cells etc.

To make 3% salt solution, you dissolve 30 teaspoons salt per gallon of water. Make sure that the salt is dissolved and the temp and pH of the dip match that of the main tank. Make sure that the water does not contain ammonia, so don't use tap, and do use dechlorinator. :)

Yay, my tap water is good for at least one thing! lol

Okay. How do I go about obtaining water with the same pH but no ammonia. hm.

When I do, how many dips should I do with her?

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Try to look for some spring or distilled water. Be careful though because some will contain ammonia.

Try one dip first. If need be, you can dip her again twice more, with a day rest between each dip.

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Okay. I will swing by the store in the morning after the pet store.

Thanks so much, yet again! c:

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Try to look for some spring or distilled water. Be careful though because some will contain ammonia.

Try one dip first. If need be, you can dip her again twice more, with a day rest between each dip.

I know you said not to leave her in the water for more than five minutes. What is the ideal amount of time for her to be in there?

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I know you said not to leave her in the water for more than five minutes. What is the ideal amount of time for her to be in there?

Five minutes :)

She is to be taken out before that if she shows signs that she can't cope being in there, which is when she starts to tip over and cannot right herself back up.

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I know you said not to leave her in the water for more than five minutes. What is the ideal amount of time for her to be in there?

Five minutes :)

She is to be taken out before that if she shows signs that she can't cope being in there, which is when she starts to tip over and cannot right herself back up.

Okay, thanks!

So, so nervous.

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The alternative is to do a salt dip, but at only 1%, so that you can be more comfortable with the method. At this concentration, she should be fine for the entire duration of the 5 minutes, and it will still have some therapeutic efficacy, although diminished compared to at 3%. Would you like to do that?

1% is 10 level teaspoons per gallon, or 37.9 grams per gallon :)

Then, we can reassess the situation in 2 days to see if we need to step up to 3%.

I totally understand that it can be nervous doing this for the first time.

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I did a dip at 3%.

She only managed two minutes before she started side tipping and I had to pull her out. Is that long enough?

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Two minutes is a decent amount if time, although of course 5 is better. Was she wobbly and not able to get up, or was she wobbly and then you were concerned so you removed her? They can (and sometimes do) tip over but will right themselves pretty much right away. You can also nudge them to see if they will right up.

In any case, good job! Let's see if the white patches begin to disappear. You may need to dip her again in two days and then once more after that. I'm not sure yet.

How is she doing?

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Two minutes is a decent amount if time, although of course 5 is better. Was she wobbly and not able to get up, or was she wobbly and then you were concerned so you removed her? They can (and sometimes do) tip over but will right themselves pretty much right away. You can also nudge them to see if they will right up.

In any case, good job! Let's see if the white patches begin to disappear. You may need to dip her again in two days and then once more after that. I'm not sure yet.

I resisted pulling her out when she first started. It was only when she tipped and couldn't right herself that I finally pulled her out.

Now she seems fine, aside from the general freaked out because that was stressful things. But no fin clamping or bottom sitting, she's just darty.

I'll keep a close eye on her. And hope for the best! I hope this takes care of it, but if not I have two more gallons of distilled water ready.

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I have 1ppm Ammonia in my tap water, and my cycle does take care of it in less than a day. The Prime will detoxify the ammonia in your tank for 24 hours, so if you're doing large daily water changes, just treat the water with Prime and and you should be good. So I second the recommendation for Prime. It's saved my butt from my horrible tap water on more than one occasion. :)

All this, word for word! Don't be discouraged.

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