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amoore658

Goldfish and Insects

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Hello everyone

I have common goldfish, and I try to feed them as balanced a diet as possible...

Monday & Wednesday: Koi/pond sticks

Tuesday: Bloodworms (frozen)

Thursday: Waxworms (they LOVE waxworms)

Friday & Saturday: Flakes

Sunday: no food (to prevent over feeding etc)

However, I read on an old post on this forum tonight about feeding goldfish live crickets - you know, the ones you get at the pet store? I was thinking of phasing out the wax worms and replacing them with crickets - if my goldfish would like/eat them?

Does anyone have any experience with this - or other live food for goldies?

Sometimes, particularly in hot weather when I leave the window to the room my goldfish are kept in ajar, "blue bottle" flies will sometimes fly in, and land in their aquarium... And its literally gobbled up within 5 seconds!

I love my goldfish alot, so want to research the idea of crickets etc as I don't want my g/fish to get harmed :)

Thanks!

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I think that their diet is a little too protein rich; I feed frozen bloodworms only one day a week, and I'm still getting good growth.

That said, I did give them a cricket that they enjoyed, though I found it in my yard and not the pet store. If you're going to feed them that, I'd pull the legs off; cruel I know, but it'll prevent them from choking on them or them forming a blockage that might lead to constipation. I've also given them a big caterpillar that they made a mess of.

So, if you like you can give it a try, but it might be more work intensive than your waxworms. You could also try mealworms or superworms.

But! I still say cut back on the meaty foods and offer more veggies. Just my opinion.

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I actually do not think that the protein content is that rich. It's about right, to me, and can possibly do with even more protein/animal, if you want more growth.

If you look at this paper,

http://www.bio.u-szeged.hu/ecology/tiscia/t22/t_22_9.pdf

where they analyze the diet of Prussian carp in the wild, you see that these fish are indeed carnivores. However, when you compare bio-mass of the various components of the carp diet, it is overwhelming coming from animal source and higher in protein.

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Hey, I've had lots of experience with feeder insects for reptiles, invertebrates and fish.

If you are using crickets, I would suggest using only small "bite sized" ones. Your goldfish should have no problem eating them whole. If they are larger, you should remove the back legs as they have small spines on them. To do this, just pinch the "thigh" and the leg should pop right off.

Be sure to "gut load" the crickets before feeding them to your fish. "Gut Loading" crickets simply means to feed them nutritious foods before you offer them to your fish. You can use various fruits and veggies, grains or even fish food! If you can find the prekilled canned crickets sold for reptiles, you will not have to worry about taking care of live crickets.

As for wax worms, they have high fat and are suggested to be fed as a treat even for reptiles. I would not suggest feeding them as often as you are doing.

Other inverts I have fed to fish include: meal worms, roach nymphs (babies) of various species, silk worms (caterpillars), earth worms, river shrimp, snails and I am sure a few others I cant currently think of. You can find many of these canned, sold for reptiles and fish from companies like Zoo Med, Exo Terra, Fluker and JurassiPet. Zoo Med also sells dried flies as "anole food" that fish enjoy.

Last of all, try feeding peas to your fish too, they love them and peas are good for them!

Good Luck!

Edited by Acro
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Goldfish aren't Prussian carp though, they're Gibel carp.

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roach nymphs?! Eeeeeeewwww!! And I bet your fish loved them!

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Goldfish aren't Prussian carp though, they're Gibel carp.

I didn't say that they were. I was pointing out diets of wild carp, and imagine Gibels to be somewhat similar.

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Interesting paper, Alex. Feral goldfish in the Vasse River in Australia http://researchrepos...Vasse_River.pdf showed a different primary food -- cyanobacteria, although they also ate all of the other things the Russian fish ate.. I found this information rather surprising. I expected big goldfish would be eating bigger food, but of course, cyanobacteria can grow in large masses.

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Interesting paper, Alex. Feral goldfish in the Vasse River in Australia http://researchrepos...Vasse_River.pdf showed a different primary food -- cyanobacteria, although they also ate all of the other things the Russian fish ate.. I found this information rather surprising. I expected big goldfish would be eating bigger food, but of course, cyanobacteria can grow in large masses.

Thanks for that paper, Shakaho. :)

I think that as (mostly) bottom feeders, there is no need for the larger goldfish to abandon a successful feeding strategy/method. It's the same with blue whales and other baleens. There's no need to hunt for other things when there is plenty of plankton :)

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I forgot to add canned foods made by NutriDiet. They have shrimp, fish eggs, Fly Larvae and a few other things. I use the fly larvae and the fish love them!

Yes fantailfan1, I used roach nymphs as food. I used to breed several species of exotic roaches (you would never believe that web sites like Koko's exisits for insect keepers). I would keep some as pets and sell the rest online. Some species brought in big money too. But now and then, I would throw a roach baby to the fish and they would chew it up. Yum yum yum.

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The prussian carp and the feral goldfish of australia are kept in 2 different climates. It makes sense that a fish in colder conditions would eat a more protein based diet than that of one who was competing with the natural fish and therefore ate the most abundant thing available (CBA). Also that a fish natural to the environment would get more choice in food than an introduction to the ecosystem.

I also couldn't find the latin name for Prussian Carp, it came up the same as the Gibel Carp. Are they in fact the same?

When out in the pond my fish would eat primarily bugs, mosquito and larvae, beetles, worms, are the visible ones... oh yeah, spiders, flies and moths I guess are visible too. (even seen them eat a dragonfly once). This is opposed to the plants and algae that are also available in the pond setting.

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Yes fantailfan1, I used roach nymphs as food. I used to breed several species of exotic roaches (you would never believe that web sites like Koko's exisits for insect keepers). I would keep some as pets and sell the rest online. Some species brought in big money too. But now and then, I would throw a roach baby to the fish and they would chew it up. Yum yum yum.

My friends think it's crazy that I'm a member of a GF forum. I wonder what they'd think if I told them I was now breeding roaches and joined a forum of insect keepers! :o

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There are forums specific for roaches, mantids, beetles, arachnids and then a few general "bug" forums. They are not subdivisions of one website but websites all their own. And I am known as "Acro" on all of them. :D

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I'm convinced. If it exists, there is a forum for it . . . :)

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You're welcome, Alex. The papers this group is producing are really good. They have the best growth curve for goldfish that I have seen.

Bodoba, yes, the Prussian carp is another name for the Gibel carp. Goldfish are true omnivores and eat what is handy, so it's likely to be different from place to place.

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I learn more every day here.

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