blinky000

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blinky000 last won the day on May 13 2012

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About blinky000

  • Rank
    The crazy rat lady
  • Birthday 06/11/1989

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    amy_weeks@hotmail.co.uk
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Previous Fields

  • Gender
    Female
  • Age
    25
  • Location
    England
  • Referred By
    Google I believe
  • How many Goldfish
    None but 5 tanks of other things is enough for now!

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. Wow, it's been a while since I updated this! The not so little guys are doing really well. Some of them are just about ready to go to their new homes! Here's a few photos for you A few of the medium sized ones: The size difference between the biggest and smallest: There's 13 babies in total, meaning I have 21 axolotls in the house at the moment! Tetralover, have a look at this page on my site for more on how to take care of these guys. I find them much less demanding than goldfish.
  2. That is one sexy looking living room. And the tank looks stunning!
  3. Haha those comic strips are great! How have I never seen them before??
  4. The main bit of advice I missed out on was to avoid pet stores like the plague. If you really want to get rats, get some from a breeder so they've been socialised properly from a young age. Pet store rats still make great pets but it's hard work to begin with and you may miss out on the enjoyment of a few precious months while you trust train them. One of mine was so nervous that we barely saw her for the first few months. She'd dash into a box the second we entered the room. I worked hard with her and you wouldn't know now. I can pretty much pinpoint the day that she realised I wasn't out to hurt her and she's been borderline clingy ever since
  5. I've been wanting to contribute to this topic for ages but I've been so busy starting a new job that I haven't had a moment to go through all my stuff! Ok, I have to stress that my collection used to be a lot bigger but I've moved house so much in the last few years that a lot of it has got lost along the way I had this bought for me a few years ago: And this little guy: An old member of this board (who is now a good friend of mine!) got me this: And this: Mouse mat and coaster: I got these from another member of this board in a gift swap in... gosh, '04? '05? And the various handmade cards from a couple of members of this board I keep every single one. They're far too nice to throw away! And some PFK t-shirts in the loft that say "fit fishkeeper" and "grumpy old fishkeeper" Also, I'm bidding on this at the moment. Oh, and when I get paid, I'm totally buying this!
  6. Aww she's gorgeous. I signed the petition too. Fairground fish is a subject that has been grinding my gears since I was a nipper. It's now illegal in some parts of the country as far as I know, which makes me wonder why fish should have more protection depending on where they are. They're still fish. It just doesn't make any sense to me.
  7. OMG, I want them ALL. Good thing I just got a job haha
  8. We really are a good looking bunch of people, aren't we This is me in Egypt last month. This is the only photo taken of me looking slightly normal. In the rest of them I'm pulling one stupid face or another haha
  9. I started out culturing mosquito larvae, bloodworm and daphnia in buckets in the garden but never really had much success with the daphnia. I eventually put this down to the lack of food that existed in the bucket when they were introduced. The next time, I left the bucket in a sunny part of the garden for a couple of weeks to accumulate some microscopic algae for the daphnia to eat and it worked much better. The easiest way to do it (in my opinion) is to simply take the lid off the waterbutt and put a couple of packets of store bought daphnia in there, provided everyone else in the house is ok with the arrangement! If you're not sure the daphnia are parasite free, try a weak potassium permanganate dip for the them, but don't leave them in the solution for more than about 10 minutes. You need to leave whatever container you use uncovered. The light can then get to the water and create food for the daphnia, and the midges can get access to lay their eggs in there. Nature will do the rest. No food supplements are necessary. After a couple of weeks, you should have a healthy population of daphnia. When it comes to harvesting, netting daphnia and mosquito larvae is usually easiest. The bloodworm (midge larvae) will have cocooned themselves in whatever sludge has built up on the sides (or bottom) of the container. They'll be easy to spot because the area around the little packages will be completely clean. To the left of this rather poorly taken photograph, you can see some small squiggles on the side of the tub surrounded by a lighter coloured area. A dead give away that there is a bloodworm there: You can then encourage them out by nudging the cocoons and then sucking up the bloodworm with a turkey baster, or scrape the cocoon off the container and suck the entire thing up. Hope this helps
  10. Here's a short video of the hunting behaviour I was talking about. It'd go great with some Jaws music I'm always keen to let nature do as much of the hard work for me as possible. As I've mentioned, I culture my own daphnia and bloodworm but I wanted to take it a step further. I've now put one of the baby axolotls actually IN the waterbutt that I've been culturing the food in. The idea is that it's as close to nature as possible and less effort on my part. Win win situation! He's been in there about a week now and doing really well. I think once the daphnia population stabilises, there'll be enough to sustain a whole batch of babies. Maybe down the line Here he is in his little strainer. The holes are big enough for food to get in but not for him to get out
  11. Quick update for you. The remaining babies are doing great. I ended up doing daily 100% water changes to get rid of the parasites in the safest possible way. I currently have one that hasn't been eating in about a week so I don't have high hopes for that one, but it hadn't really grown at all since it hatched. They are now split into 2 groups since some seem significantly larger than the others. They're on a diet of mainly bloodworm, which again I am taking from my own back garden so I know they're parasite free I'll see if I can get a video of them hunting later today. Since their front legs have pretty much completely grown in, they've started stalking their food and actively moving towards it rather than waiting for something to pass by their mouths. And they're at that painfully cute stage where they've realised I'm the one with the food so they get all excited to see me
  12. Just read this PFK article about a new breed of arowana. Just stunning!
  13. Yeah, she could definitely do with some Hikari gold...
  14. How gorgeous is this?! Not something I'd wear on a night out but stunning none the less
  15. I've been avoiding updating this topic for a while but I'll bite the bullet. Just before I went on holiday, leaving the axolotls in the care of my dad, I bought a bag of glassworms since the bigger babies were getting to the size that they needed something a bit more substantial than daphnia. Unfortunately, upon my return, I found that the majority of my babies had died. All, in fact, but the container of small babies and a few in the main nursery tank. Upon sticking some water under my trusty microscope, I found that the glassworms were RIDDLED with trichondia and chilodonella. I was livid. Thankfully, the ones that were only exposed minimally seem to be doing fine and I'm doing 100% daily water changes on the others. The majority are eating ok and look as though they'll pull through but I only have a small handful left. In fact, about 10 leucistics and 2 wildtypes. The last albino died over the weekend. Of course, this incident has been deeply disappointing since they were all doing so well up until that rouge bag of glassworms but to every cloud, a silver lining. My home daphnia culture is thriving, so when I get the courage together to try breeding again, I need never buy from an untrustworthy source. You never realise just how unhealthy store bought daphnia looks until you culture your own. Instead of being slow and peach coloured, they're too fast for me to catch with a net and dark brown, full of eggs! I'll get some photos of the remaining babies (and a daphnia comparison) later on