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To many troubles

Ok so Bows and Ru are males. And they are chasing Luna so thats why her tail is split. So she is in the pond with the tadpols before they make her crazy. That means I now have four males out of 8. Guess she stays in the pond till they are feeling less male. lol

Hidr

Hidr

 

Think the water was bad

Now I am having some issues in the 75 gallon. The 150 and 75 were the ones that got large water changes Friday. Problem with 150 started the next day. Now there is a problem in the 75 gallon. So thinking the water was contaminated with something when I did water change Friday. Something that I can't test for with my test kit. 150 is fine now. Well keep testing. I am doing a 90 percent water change on the 75 now and believe it well be fine when that is done but well keep checking. I also have my UV filter in the 150. I hope I wont need one for the 75. Or the 60.

Hidr

Hidr

 

LARGE water change on 150

Test today showed really high nitrates. So doing a 90 percent water change and cleaning filters. I also am adding my UV light until whatever this is with Buttons and Luna is gone. Other then blood showing in their fins they are all still very active and eating. Might be adding my long planter back in with plants to help get this tank cycled again. Got to go to pet store tomorrow for more prime tomorrow. Shimmer and Blinky are in the rubber maid tub and doing well.

Hidr

Hidr

 

More Room for Swimmin'

Got a 15 gallon bowfront set up for the Noodles (our balloon molly fry) last night and moved them over this morning from the two smaller grow-out tanks they'd been in since birth. They look practically microscopic in their luxurious new digs, but it won't be long before I'll be needing yet another tank for them if they keep growing at such an astonishing rate. I'm so glad I remembered to get a sponge cover for the filter intake. They'd been in unfiltered tanks previously, with large daily water changes, so it's time for them to learn to swim with some current in the water. But I don't want any of them getting accidentally sucked in, yikes! The fry were three weeks old a few days ago. They eat like little piglets (baby brine shrimp daily, and NLS fry powder) and are pooping machines. Have only lost one, a tiny runt, about a week ago, leaving us with 21 babies. Watching them grow and change is downright addictive!

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Notes on 150 for myself.

Luna now has blood on her tail and it is split. What ever it most likely were in there with the oscars. They were just imune to it from being in the tank so long. I took Buttons out and added him back. I tested the water once again it is fine. (since this is not D&D I wont post them.) They are within range. So I am thinking either something was in the tank or the stress of the move gave them infections, Did a 30 percent water change anyways. Have them all on metro meds and going to do 30% water change daily. The only thing is it takes a long time for fins to clear up so not sure how I well know if they are better or not. Maybe do 10 day metro meds. So cleaned out qt tub and have it reset up for the Shimmer and Blinky. They well go there till I am sure this thing is gone in the big tank. Fish are active and eating very well.

Hidr

Hidr

 

Buttons looks bloody

His tail fin is really bloody looking. Possible some red on his sides too. He is in QT with melafix and metro meds. All others in the tank look great. But did a water change even though I just did one Friday.

Hidr

Hidr

 

Icky Icky Ich!

A light outbreak of ich in the main balloon molly tank, and it's all my fault. I didn't quarantine our newest acquisition long enough. I think I've gotten so used to the mollies being generally healthier and less troublesome than goldfish, so I felt fairly confident about doing an abbreviated QT based on, honestly, nothing at all. Now we have ich. It's not bad, just a few specks on everyone's tail fins. I'm glad because I caught it in the very earliest stages. Have added salt to .2% and upped the heat to 83 (they were at 80-ish previously). Last round of salt going in tomorrow, and then we'll hold tight and hope this blows over quickly. Fingers and fins crossed! Meanwhile, in the fry tanks, The Noodles continue to thrive. We haven't lost one yet, which is awesome and baffling at the same time. Still standing strong at 22. They're growing like little weeds and now know that my hands mean food. No more skittery behavior when I need to do something in one of the tanks. Random pic, just 'cause I love my molly girls. This is Creamy, who's a lovely pale shade of yellow on top and bright white beneath, with see-through pectoral fins. Two of the 22 fry I currently have are from Creamy.

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Swimmin' Space

Divided the Noodles (our 22 balloon molly fry) into two tanks tonight, 11 in each, to give them maximum room to grow. They've already doubled, possibly tripled, in size in just over a week. They eat voraciously, and get both crushed/powdered tropical flakes and thawed baby brine shrimp each day. I'm going to have to keep an eye on Craigslist for a decent sized tank or tanks for them. Two 20 gallons would be about right, but I don't know where I'd put them. I'll figure it out though; maybe I can find one with a stand. I'm not entirely sure I want to turn my bedroom into a balloon molly breeding factory, so I'm not certain I'll do the fry thing again on a large scale like this. But this first time is really fun, and there's no telling what the future will bring.

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

They grow so FAST!

It's now five days since our gazillion (well, actually 20, but they look like 10 times that) balloon molly fry were born, and we still haven't lost a single one. Knock wood, etc. As soon as Gem, the mommy molly to all these fry, is finished with her QT and moved to the main aquarium, I'm going to transfer half the fry to that tank, and will have two fry tanks going simultaneously. I want them to have maximum room to grow -- not that they're having any trouble in that regard. I swear they've already doubled in size in just 5 days. I'm feeding them powdered flake food several times a day, and they also get defrosted baby brine shrimp once daily. I didn't realize how absolutely microscopic those baby brine shrimp are! It's just a pretty orange cloud in the water, and you can hardly make them out. But the fry go nuts when I feed them shrimp, and end up with beautifully round tummies about 15 minutes later. The babies are extremely varied in their coloration, and I'm super-curious to find out how that changes as they grow. But whatever color they are, they all kind of look like sardines right now. Here's a side view of one of them: Could those eyes BE any bigger?

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Oodles of Noodles!

The niecelets and I hit a new-to-me LFS this weekend that I hadn't realized was only 15 minutes from my house. It was huge, with lots of really beautiful fish. We were hoping to find a new balloon molly (of course), after the unexpected loss of one last week. No luck, but we stopped at one of our regular LFSs afterward, and lo and behold, they had an absolute stunner, an almost all-black beauty with white speckles and highlights that the 6-year-old niecelet promptly named Gem. Gem. Isn't she a beauty? Got the QT tank set up for Gem at home, added water, heater and ridiculous decor the girls insisted on (I'm a sucker, what can I say?), and gently placed Gem in her temporary new home. Seconds later, the 9-year-old niece screams, "A baby just came out!" Yep. Gem had dropped an adorable little fry. Because we'd seen how eagerly the other mollies consume their offspring, there was much chaos as we netted the new baby and transferred it to the fry tank with the existing 3 babies. But baby oh baby, Gem was not done! We had a tense 5 minutes or so when a half-in, half-out fry, being born tail first, appeared to be stuck. He was HUGE when Gem finally got him out. After that, babies were coming fast and furious. We would give Gem a break for 10 minutes or so, and leave her alone in the dimly lit room, only to come back to 5 ... 6 ... even 7 more fry at a time. One of our many fry. She had TWENTY BABIES altogether! The fry tank is positively swarming now, and they've been nicknamed The Noodles. Our very first fry, Cutiepie (born about 8 weeks ago, gender still unknown), was promoted to the big tank, lest he consume his new pseudo-siblings, and has settled in happily. The remaining 22 are all, miraculously, alive and well. There's a real variety of color in this batch. Several dark ones, some white ones, some striped ones, and the one and only all-black fry, the little whale who got stuck during birth (he's now known as "Shaft"). They gobble powdered flake food, and tonight had their very first meal of defrosted frozen baby brine shrimp. Many adorably round tummies! Another one. They're all the colors of the rainbow. I had expected a little die-off at the start, but 48 hours in, all appear healthy. I already have a routine going, using a turkey baster to siphon uneaten food from the bottom of the tank, then draining and replacing a little over 75% of the water daily. Once Gem has completed her QT, I plan to use her vacated tank for half the fry, to give them all maximum room to grow and to maintain good water quality. Poor little thing was exhausted after delivering all those babies, and refused food for 24 hours. Now she's eating like crazy and zooming all over the QT tank, being a typical little balloon molly. If she doesn't break with ich or anything else funky in the next week or so, she's going to join her new girlfriends in the big tank. I asked for it, and I got it! We have oodles of Noodles and couldn't be happier! Back shot!

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Ebb and Flow

So out of nowhere, my favorite balloon molly girl died on Saturday. She started swimming erratically, and an hour later she was dead. It's four days later, and all the others are doing well. Water parameters were perfect at the time of her death, and I hadn't introduce new foods or anything unusual. This molly was one of my very favorites, a white-with-black-speckles dalmatian that my nieces had named "Dot." She was hugely pregnant a week or two before she died, but never gave birth that I was aware of (I found no fry, and never observed her doing the about-to-have-babies routine the others have done). So it's possible that she retained the babies and was attempting to reabsorb them, which can be deadly -- and unfortunately, there's no cure. I'm keeping a close eye on everyone else, of course, but haven't seen anything troubling. The three fry continue to grow and thrive, and the smallest of the three, the one born a couple months ago, is almost large enough to introduce to the main tank with the adults. If I get any new fry soon (a couple of the gals are super-preggers), it will be officially time for him/her to make the move. Really enjoying these balloon mollies, in spite of the recent loss of Dot. They're super-engaging little fish, swarming the front of the tank in a little knot every time I look at them. They learned to hand-feed easily (even the tiny little 5-millimeter fry are hand feeding!) and are very very active and tons of fun. This little tropical detour I'm on has proved to be a fun one indeed! Not one of my girls, but they look just like this.

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Population Explosion!

So a few days ago, I noticed one of the balloon molly gals was a bit withdrawn, hanging out in the "birthing tunnel" ornament I put in the tank (it's like a bridge covered with artificial grass, so the birthing mama can hide a bit while she's in labor and the fry can swim up through little holes in the ceiling and hide in the grass). It was Creamy (remember, all fish named by young nieces!), the light yellow female, who had been looking ridiculously pregnant for days. I've read that livebearers tend to have their babies in the wee hours of the morning, and as it happened, I was up extraordinarily late and checked the tank before going to bed. I could barely even register what I was seeing when a teeny-tiny pair of eyes with a tail fin emerged from the fake grass and started swimming upward. The whole sequence took less than one second: Omigod, it's a -- CHOMP. Yeah, one of the other molly gals practically inhaled the baby before my eyes. And then she did it again with another one. I didn't see any others, and Creamy was swimming around like usual and no longer looked ... birthwardly inclined. I went to sleep pretty annoyed with Shiny, the perpetrator. Shiny's the white molly who weeks earlier had given birth to the lone fry in my fry tank. It's hard to be mad at a fish (I mean, she was just doing what nature dictates, you know? If it swims, and it fits in her mouth, it's food). But I was still pretty p.o.'d. I've got fry food, I've got a lovely heated fry tank, I am so freakin' ready to raise up some baby balloon mollies. The next day, my eagle-eyed six-year-old niece spotted a rogue baby hanging out near the surface, and we safely dispatched it to the fry tank. The fry born a month earlier, Cutiepie (remember, she names the fish), looked enormous next to the newbie, but not big enough to gobble it up. This morning, Creamy was doing the hiding-in-the-tunnel routine again, and I found one more baby. So now I have three fry, which sounds kind of pathetic given that mollies are unbelievably prolific, but I'm over the moon. Hoping to find more babies tonight, if I'm lucky.

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Which ingredients are okay to use?

When I started researching what foods to put into my gel food the amount of information was overwhelming. Was I really ready to become some kind of amateur goldfish nutritionist? I had to ask myself "why am I doing this?" and the answer was because I wanted the best food for my fish. I wanted to feed them organic, live plant based foods as a supplement to pellets. I wanted to vary the ingredients occasionally while still ensuring that their nutritional needs were being met. I would see a dozen recipes for gel-food that included spinach and broccoli, then read somewhere else to avoid spinach and broccoli. Giving my fish fruit treats sounded fun for us both, but then I read that they couldn't digest sugar well. It was clear that I would have to educate myself somewhat if I was going to have my own opinions on this apparently confusing and controversial subject. I'm new to making gel-food, and no expert. "I'm only 10 minutes ahead of you", as my IT colleague used to joke when I'd ask him a technical question. Or you might be a biologist in a fish-lab somewhere - and are -ing your way through my goldfish food blog. I'm just posting this as a trail of breadcrumbs marking my path on what I find interesting, confusing or useful. Go back STEP 1

mysterygirl

mysterygirl

 

Baby Boom!

So in my last entry, I wrote about the completely unresearched, unscientific way that I found myself walking out of the LFS with a bag of five female balloon mollies. Totally out of character for me to get a fish without learning as much as I can ahead of time. But I really wasn't thinking straight after senselessly losing multiple groups of baby pearlscales in an effort to establish my first-ever all-tiku tank, so I rolled with my impulses and found myself standing in front of my empty-but-thoroughly-sterilized aquarium, floating my bag o' mollies and wondering what to do next. At some point in all the general fishkeeping reading I've done over the years, I had learned to differentiate between male and female mollies (which is super easy to do, as they have some very distinctly different physical characteristics). I also knew that males can be territorial and persnickety with one another. So I'd selected only female mollies, figuring maybe one or two would already be pregnant, but assuming that that would end quickly with a few fry, and we'd put the baby-birthing behind us. Within days, two of the already-round balloon girls became even rounder, and kept ... well, ballooning, until I thought that one of them, the all-white fish (named "Shiny" by my young niece) would quite literally burst. I was feeding the whole gaggle of them one morning when, to my surprise, a tiny little speck with huge eyes darted out from the mouth of the tiki statue and gobbled at a passing flake of food. Fast little bugger. He was dispatched via turkey baster to a small "fry tank" I quickly set up. A second baby, who had buried itself in the gravel to avoid being eaten by the always-hungry mature fish, only lasted a few days after transfer. Okay, one pregnancy done, maybe one more to go, right? Imagine my shock when I learned that from a single breeding, female mollies can store sperm for as long as SIX MONTHS, and can basically get pregnant whenever they feel like it (and do so, on average, once a month). So with five females, all showing varying degrees of roundness, I could conceivably be looking at 25 or more births. All without any additional fish-sex taking place, mind you. There are miracles of (literally) biblical proportions occurring in my aquarium. When the Three Wise Fish come riding up on seahorses, I won't be a bit surprised. But since that first birth, zilch. Three out of the five molly girls look ridiculously pregnant, but they either won't drop their fry, or are somehow releasing them in the dead of night, eating the evidence, and strangely remaining bloated. I've been trying everything. Increased the temp a couple of degrees, which is supposed to encourage labor. Been feeding these mostly plant-based eaters a higher protein diet, with thawed frozen bloodworms and brine shrimp, which is supposed to be good for the babies' development and (surprise) encourage labor. Added a large "fry tunnel" ornament that's covered with bushy artificial grass, which would give any babies a place to hide, the moms a place to give birth, and should relax them enough to (you guessed it) encourage labor. Nope. One very fat fry in the grow-out tank, with no buddies to speak of. He/she is growing so rapidly that I don't think I could add newborn fry to that tank anyway, as he might actually be large enough to EAT them at this point. I should print and paste this to the aquarium's side, to inspire them to get busy already! Baby fish look mostly the same, but they're all pretty cute. This waiting game is getting old really fast. Gimme babies!

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

I want my fish to be big

But then again with five maybe I should be happy with just a little bigger for the little ones and the larger ones stay the size they are. lol Fortantly so far both my fantails are way under the average but Bows is still young. However now that Buttons is growing fins he may be pretty much as big as he well get body wise. Luna too since she seems to have halted and at much smaller then average size. Only LFS fish I remember ever getting big was my fantail Sunrise and Mongo that was big when I got him.. All the rest stayed smallish. Only other big fish were ones I ordered online and none of those lived more then a year. Sunrise. He was moved to a pond. Gone now. But never forgotten. Mongo only had him about year or so. So miss this fish. He was the closest I ever come to my dream fish. The page I borrowed this from is gone now. So if it needs to be removed I understand. Just being melancholy.

Hidr

Hidr

 

Up Up and Away with my Beautiful Balloons

So I completely lost it when the baby tikus mentioned in my last blog entry arrived with 2 of them DOA and the rest looking sketchy. Total loss within 48 hours. It was awful. The seller very kindly sent replacements at no charge, all of which were DOA. It was ridiculous. They couldn't even make it into my tank before going belly-up. My theory is that both the online seller and the LFS were getting their baby pearlscales from the same wholesaler. Both the online seller and the store are in California, so it's likely that the same importer was supplying their fish (and clearly this was a very bad batch of pearlscales!). I was beyond depressed at that point, and it was made even worse once I scoured and disinfected every last inch of the aquarium and got everything reassembled and running again. I was being taunted by that shiny fresh tank, just sitting there bubbling away, fish-less. Every time I walked past, it was mocking me. I kept cruising the four or so local fish stores near me that have a decent selection of goldfish, but nothing was screaming "Take me home!" I had had my heart set on pearlscales, and the others just left me feeling kind of meh. I even saw some really sweet young ranchus in some of my favorite color combos, but they just weren't doing it for me. And even though I'm really fairly certain that the Great Pearlscale Massacre of 2015 wasn't my fault in the slightest, losing so many fish in such a short period of time had really left me shaken, and I was questioning my abilities as a fishkeeper. When you're scooping two or three dead fish from your aquarium on a daily basis, you have to wonder what you're doing wrong. It's just natural. So I was shuffling through my favorite LFS, scanning through the tanks of goldfish I'd looked at just a few days before, wondering halfheartedly if I should just get those red and white orandas already, or maybe that nice white butterfly telescope, and call it done, when I drifted further to the right -- and saw a tank filled with these unbelievably wiggly fish that made my heart leap. You see, they kind of resembled my dear departed tiku pearlscales. Round, globe-like bodies and tiny little heads. But unlike the pearlies I'd been watching perish in rapid succession, these fish were astonishingly energetic. They were positively swarming through the tank and as I leaned in for a closer look, the whole mass of them just converged in front of my face, paddling frantically and vying for attention. What WERE these little fishy gremlins? Two words: Balloon mollies. Huh? Mollies? But those were TROPICAL fish. And aside from puffers, I'd never kept a tropical fish in my life. I'm a goldfish girl through and through, baby. Goldfish are challenging. They're unique. They're ever so much more complex than the aquarium world gives them credit for. And mollies are just ... mollies. I mean, doesn't everybody and his cousin have some black mollies in a tank with, like, minnows and some moss and tadpoles from the creek? I mean, mollies? Please. But I just couldn't tear myself away from that tank. If I moved to the right or left, the whole gaggle of fish followed me. They were ridiculously lopsided and, well, balloon-y. And I realized I was smiling. I mean, come on. So I did something that I never ever do when it comes to keeping pets. I am the Queen of Research, the Goddess of Learning All You Can Before You Buy, Little Miss Scolds-You-If-You-Don't-Know-What-You're-Getting-Into. And yet I grabbed the nearest LFS employee, pointed out my favorite five balloon mollies, and I was out the door and in my car before I even knew what happened. Coming soon: Salve for my battered fishkeeper's soul, how balloon mollies are a lot like goldfish, and omigod-what's-that-speck-oh-CRAP-is-that-a-baby?

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Please Mr. Postman

Found an online seller of baby ping pong pearlies and ordered some to ship this week. I'm not particular about color with this variety of goldie, as long as they're nice and round, which I've been assured they are. They typically only come in orange, orange/white and calico anyway, and like I said, I'm not fussy. Just want them roly-poly and ... healthy. For freak's sake, let them be healthy. So I have their tank disinfected from the others and ready to go. Picking up another wad of cycled media from my friend today (she's hosting the Superbowl party I'm going to), and will feed the BBs with fish food the next few days until the fish arrive. Please be gentle, mail carrier. Precious cargo. I'm giving the tiku thing another chance, so help me.

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Oh, the carnage

So all 4 of the new tikus perished within the first 48 hours. Am I surprised? Not really, because that's pretty much par for the course for me with this variety of goldfish. And I wasn't the least bit surprised when I returned to the LFS to find that the rest of their batch of tikus (about 10 or so) had died on them, too. Right now I have the tank running with an extra-heavy level of salt, to kill off the ich that these little boogers brought in (which naturally bloomed on them and became visible AFTER I had bought them). I'm still debating what to do, fish-wise. Maybe it's time for a goldfish break. I could get a little posse of dwarf puffers, which is always fun (they're really interesting and interactive fish!). The only drawback to DPs is their size; they are seriously tiny and you have to stand right in front of the tank to appreciate them. I have my aquarium light on a timer that turns the light out about half an hour after I go to bed; it's awesome to lie there and watch the fish before I fall asleep. Can't really do that with the puffs, because they're too small. Another option would be a pair of red eye puffers; they're easily sourced online right now. But with those, you have to worry about feeding them crunchy foods to keep their teeth filed down, which means snails, and I'm not in the mood for breeding snails at the moment. Too much work. So those are out. SIGH. I guess I'll just wait until something aquatic smacks me upside the head and says "ME! I'M THE ONE!" Most likely a goldfish, preferably some pearlscales, but we'll see... A passel of baby bubble eyes would be awfully fun too.

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Alive and Swimmin'...

Seems like life gets in the way of my Koko's enjoyment at times -- it has really been a while since I've browsed around here! It's always weird when I come back from a Koko's break to see how many new folks have joined and become very active voices on the forum. Don't get me wrong, it's a great thing, but I'm like, Who ARE you people? Well, welcome one and all! Sadly, I lost Astro, my beautiful calico butterfly, just last week. I got to enjoy him for two years, but it's never enough, is it? Hula, my bubble eye, fell victim to the overfeeding of a pet sitter while I was on vacation last spring. I had portioned the food for the goldies into individual baggies, and instructed her to only feed ONE bag per day, but I came home to this: "They were so hungry that I fed them four bags, one after the other, and they ate it ALL." So I'm pretty sure the resulting ammonia spike was what did in my delicate little bubble boy. Needless to say, I have a new pet sitter. So, finding myself fishless, I stopped by my favorite LFS this morning on a whim, just to see what they had. Lo and behold -- a tank full of tikus! (For those who aren't into pearlscales, tikus are the super-round ones without headgrowth that are also known as "ping pong" or "golf ball" pearlies.) Tikus are an old favorite of mine, although I have never EVER had luck at keeping one alive for more than a year (and for many, it was a matter of mere weeks or, if I was on a hot streak, months). Ping pong pearlies are notorious for being delicate and difficult to keep alive (although I realize the same can be said about most fancy goldfish, but just trust me, these guys are challenging for even an experienced keeper). After ogling the pearlies for at least 15 minutes, grinning from ear to ear, I selected my favorite four, had them transferred to a tank holding baby black ranchus, paid, and watched them hang the "THESE PING PONGS SOLD!" receipt on the glass. I'll be picking them up tomorrow -- have to get my tank up and running and stop by my friend's house to mooch some of her great BB-laden filter media so I can have an insta-cycled aquarium ready to go. Let's just hope past history doesn't repeat itself. It's been years since I've had tikus. Wish me luck, will you?

RanchuDressing

RanchuDressing

 

Needed a change so moved fish around

Moved the oscars and parrot fish to the 75 gallon. Will still have to do a really huge water change once a week but doing that anyways. Moved the goldfish (and the new ones) to the 150. Will still get to do 30 to 50 gallons a week. Nothing changes for me but big changes for the fish. Pictures on the forum when stuff settles down.

Hidr

Hidr

 

This darn fry tank....

Pre-history: This tank had a betta and three tetras. Was planted with moss from Haley and Anubias. I moved the tank, lost the betta and one tetra. Two tetras lived undisturbed until June when one fry went in named Lulu. It was a hot summer and the cats drank out of the tank so everyday I filled up 10-25% of the water. The params were normal even though the plant and algae were building up. Those three fish went into the pond. Current Occupants: 3 little fry, Clarabelle, Isabelle, and Sweetiebelle. I added them without changing the tank which is my snafoo #1. So I tested the params a few days later and holy bean curds! The nitrates were off the charts! I tested my tap pH and it was vastly different than the tank . (7.4 tap and 8.2 tank) So everyday I have been doing 50% water changes and trying to get the detritus and algae away. The fish are getting more active, the nitrates are slowly going down, the pH is levelled at 8 at the moment and as soon as the params are where I want them I will start prazi and salt on them. What changed was the cats stopped drinking so much so it wasn't getting the fresh water change daily, that and the detritus caused the nitrates to spike up. I have matrix which has controlled nitrates in the past for me, I could have added that to the tank but I think the detritus should be almost absent before I add materials that absorb. What to do now: Get these fry happy and growing and take pics!

bodoba

bodoba

 

Update 2014

It's been a long time but I just need a place to review this year's fish care and make plans for next year. The 270 gal pond is not going up again next year. The 600 gal pond now houses all my fish currently. The 8 gal tank has three little fry from the draining of the 270. Have yet to be prazi'd or salted but as soon as I find the products I will get them started. The 60 gal is empty and will remain empty in case the three fry outgrow the 8 gal in the winter months. I have 25 plus fish as of the last count. This year is cull year. I cull every three years. This year I'll aim for 30% reduction (7-8 fish.) I've picked about 5 so far. It has been an incredibly raining/flood season this summer so we have over fifteen frogs living in our pond. I suspect there will be no fry from the fall drain of the 600 gal. At the end of September the 600 will be drained, the fish will be prazi'd and salted as they normally are at the end of pond season and are being stored in an insulated garage with an o-ring to keep the filter turning. This will by far be the coldest I have ever kept the fish in the winter. I hope it goes well cause this is the winter situation for the next few years until we build our own garage. Hopes: my boyfriend wants a koi. He thinks he can sort out a 3000gal pond in the surrounding area of the current 600 gal. Personally we have quite the list of renovations to do before we do that so it is a long term project unless I can find a way to get it done under $5 k. I would like to reduce my stocking to an isolated set of traits, there is too much floating in the gene pool right now that my fry are quite sporadic. I would also like to be on the lookout in May to qt a few better selections for the ponds which means I need to start monthly searches in around Dec. I will update after the fish are drained from the pond.

bodoba

bodoba

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